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Sat Sep 28, 2019, 08:33 PM

Regents: Fall 2019 enrollment down at South Dakota public universities

Enrollment at South Dakota's six public universities is slightly down this year, the Board of Regents announced this week.

Total enrollment is down about 3.4 percent, or 1,217 students, compared to last year, according to a Friday release from the South Dakota Board of Regents. Total headcount is at 34,520.

The number of full-time students for fall 2019 was down by about 790 students to a total of about 25,304.

The decline could in part be due to South Dakota's low unemployment rate and strong job market, and the state's need for more financial aid, Paul B. Beran, the South Dakota Board of Regents executive director and CEO, said in the release.

Read more: https://www.argusleader.com/story/news/2019/09/28/south-dakota-universities-fall-enrollment/3803304002/

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Reply Regents: Fall 2019 enrollment down at South Dakota public universities (Original post)
TexasTowelie Sep 28 OP
PoindexterOglethorpe Sep 28 #1
at140 Sep 28 #2
PoindexterOglethorpe Sep 28 #3
at140 Sep 28 #4
PoindexterOglethorpe Sep 28 #6
MyMission Sep 28 #5
tirebiter Sep 28 #7

Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Sat Sep 28, 2019, 08:35 PM

1. Alas, University enrollment is down in at least one other state.

New Mexico, where I live has reported a decline.

I'm not sure if it's because of fewer 18 year olds coming into the system, or if young people are finally understanding that a four year college degree is not the best thing for everyone.

What I want to see is if community college enrollments are up, especially in trade programs and the like.

I've been telling young people for years to look hard at the community colleges and get a degree or certificate that leads to a real job.

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Response to PoindexterOglethorpe (Reply #1)

Sat Sep 28, 2019, 08:54 PM

2. Students are finding out tuition is too high,

student loans are easy to get, and the college degree (usually not in STEM area) does not get them a good job, but then they are saddled with student debt with mounting interest.

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Response to at140 (Reply #2)

Sat Sep 28, 2019, 09:02 PM

3. High tuition is certainly a large factor.

What has been making me crazy for decades is how students will borrow to the max to pay for college without giving any real thought to whether or not the degree they get leads to a job.

It's just fine to major in 17th Century French poetry, if that's what rocks your boat. But you need to think hard and long about a lifetime of waiting tables with that degree.

High school seniors all ought to take a course of some kind about their future. They need to take one of those interest inventory tests which suggest potential career options. And those tests need to be expanded to cover trades like plumbing and welding and auto mechanics and the like. You can always go off and read 17th Century French poetry on your own. Meanwhile, it's nice to have a good job.

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Response to PoindexterOglethorpe (Reply #3)

Sat Sep 28, 2019, 09:12 PM

4. High school students at age below 19, can never

understand what a real world job is like.
What needs to be taught to high school students is that a good paying job is not fun and games.
Higher the wages, harder the job will be, and more boring.

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Response to at140 (Reply #4)

Sat Sep 28, 2019, 09:31 PM

6. So true.

Which is why vocational ed should be a huge part of high school. Even for the kids who are clearly going to do a four year degree and some sort of professional school.

I was an airline ticket agent for ten years at National Airport in Washington DC. Tough job. I learned to hate people. But more to the point, we noticed that people who themselves dealt with the public could empathize with what we were going through on the bad days. Doctors, lawyers, not so much. They expected the world to revolve around them and didn't understand that we had no control over things like weather and maintenance.

I've long thought that every single person should have to spend at least six months in some kind of serious public contact job, like waiting tables or retail.

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Sat Sep 28, 2019, 09:18 PM

5. 61.53% in South Dakota voted for rump

Which I translate to mean many there aren't that smart, and don't see the need for higher education.

No offense to you SD folks here, who are obviously much smarter than most in your state!
I live in the gerrymandered state of NC, where rump won with only 49.83%. But I'm in a red district that also went for him and Meadows by 60%.

FYI. I had a career in higher education, and crunch numbers for fun. After the election I compiled a list of the bad(stupid) states that he won, along with the percentages. I also have a list of the good(smart) states.

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Sat Sep 28, 2019, 10:27 PM

7. College is already at least partially covered without loans

After retirement I reentered college to gather some skills for unmet goals. I saw a thing about F.S.F.A. And started signing up. Having completed it I am getting a California Promise Grant that cuts my fees in half. If I was taking a full load I could get up to $2500.00 and a Pell Grant for another $5300. I am lower middle class. It can be done, people. People seem to just pass it over or think too difficult not going there. It’s a hell of a lot easier than feeling the entire system needs to be changed. Pell’ s are federal if your state doesn’t give grants. They’re there to be had.

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