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Mon Dec 14, 2020, 12:51 AM

Atom-thin transistor uses half the voltage of common semiconductors, boosts current density


The two-dimensional structure could by key for quantum computing, extending Moore's Law
Date:
December 10, 2020
Source:
University at Buffalo
Summary:
Researchers report a new, two-dimensional transistor made of graphene and molybdenum disulfide that needs less voltage and can handle more current than today's semiconductors.


University at Buffalo researchers are reporting a new, two-dimensional transistor made of graphene and the compound molybdenum disulfide that could help usher in a new era of computing.

As described in a paper accepted at the 2020 IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting, which is taking place virtually next week, the transistor requires half the voltage of current semiconductors. It also has a current density greater than similar transistors under development.

This ability to operate with less voltage and handle more current is key to meet the demand for new power-hungry nanoelectronic devices, including quantum computers.

"New technologies are needed to extend the performance of electronic systems in terms of power, speed, and density. This next-generation transistor can rapidly switch while consuming low amounts of energy," says the paper's lead author, Huamin Li, Ph.D., assistant professor of electrical engineering in the UB School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).

More:
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/12/201210145735.htm

16 replies, 5052 views

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Reply Atom-thin transistor uses half the voltage of common semiconductors, boosts current density (Original post)
Judi Lynn Dec 2020 OP
Crowman2009 Dec 2020 #1
caraher Dec 2020 #3
SeattleVet Dec 2020 #2
Aussie105 Dec 2020 #4
burrowowl Dec 2020 #6
RVN VET71 Dec 2020 #15
BlancheSplanchnik Dec 2020 #16
Aussie105 Dec 2020 #5
BlueWavePsych Dec 2020 #7
LudwigPastorius Dec 2020 #8
reACTIONary Dec 2020 #9
LudwigPastorius Dec 2020 #11
reACTIONary Dec 2020 #13
NNadir Dec 2020 #10
LudwigPastorius Dec 2020 #12
NNadir Dec 2020 #14

Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Mon Dec 14, 2020, 01:31 PM

1. This could help further miniaturize electronics and...

...make vehicles lighter and fuel/electrically efficient.

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Response to Crowman2009 (Reply #1)

Mon Dec 14, 2020, 10:18 PM

3. I don't think it will do a lot for weight and fuel efficiency

The energy use of automotive electronics is already tiny, as is the collective mass of electronic components compared to the mass of a car.

But the potential miniaturization you mention, which is linked to computing power, is a big deal.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Mon Dec 14, 2020, 09:30 PM

2. That's a bit smaller than the earlier models.

The first transistor (replica, but it was the best photo I found that had a good size reference):




(Just imagine how many buildings the new Apple M1 chip with 16 billion transistors in 0.184 inē a chip would have to be housed in, using those!)

And this is way smaller than that!

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Mon Dec 14, 2020, 10:24 PM

4. Damn!

So my brand new, expensive laptop is out of date ALREADY?

I wants my money back!!

Question: Can chips now be made small enough to include in the vaccine? To set Trump Thinkers brains on the right track only, of course!

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Response to Aussie105 (Reply #4)

Tue Dec 15, 2020, 02:13 AM

6. Complainer!

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Response to Aussie105 (Reply #4)

Fri Dec 18, 2020, 12:05 PM

15. Let me clarify the brain-chip plot to reassure Trumpers

The chips, the ones Fauci-Gates-Soros have developed to be included in the covid19 vaccine, control the actual electrical activity of the brain. They interfere with neurons that are actually firing and, therefore, the thoughts and images that those neurons are generating.

In other words, Trumpers need not worry.

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Response to RVN VET71 (Reply #15)

Sun Dec 20, 2020, 04:41 PM

16. 😆

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Mon Dec 14, 2020, 10:26 PM

5. duplicate deleted.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Dec 15, 2020, 01:02 PM

7. Waay cool!

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)


Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Wed Dec 16, 2020, 08:23 AM

9. "Could by key for quantum computing"....

in the article title is a bit of a stretch from "could ultimately lead to advancements in quantum research and development", which is the actual quote from the article.

I can see this as having an impact on all kinds of research and development. But what does it have to do with quantum computing? Nothing that I can tell.

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Response to reACTIONary (Reply #9)

Wed Dec 16, 2020, 11:34 PM

11. This transistor's experimental TFET design is based on a quantum effect.

https://spectrum.ieee.org/semiconductors/devices/the-tunneling-transistor

As far as I could tell, this may be the first practical, true 2D TFET design.

From a larger perspective, large-scale quantum computers are going to need smaller, more energy efficient transistors if they are ever going to surpass conventional supercomputers for some applications.

Digital computers, of course, would also benefit from this advance.

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Response to LudwigPastorius (Reply #11)

Thu Dec 17, 2020, 07:41 AM

13. Thanks! I'll look into it further! nt.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Wed Dec 16, 2020, 04:53 PM

10. I wish I had a dollar for every "breakthrough" technology in University Press releases that went...

...nowhere, and another dollar for every "breakthrough" announced at a scientific meeting I attended that went nowhere.

Of course, I've also been around unannounced and unheralded scientific work that actually mattered.

Graphene is not yet an industrial scalable materials overall.

We can wait for the published data in a paper format before cheering too wildly.

Many university "breakthrough" announcements are about funding, a necessary evil, but something of an evil all the same.

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Response to NNadir (Reply #10)

Wed Dec 16, 2020, 11:53 PM

12. I don't think these researchers were trying to address production techniques or scalability.

I think the "breakthrough" is the 2D design and their claims to its efficiency.

But, there are people out there working on how to make the the hybrid material this thing is made of.

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.chemmater.0c00503

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Response to LudwigPastorius (Reply #12)

Thu Dec 17, 2020, 08:38 AM

14. Yes I know. I skim this particular journal regularly to point out things to my son.

It's not like I really needs his old man to point stuff out to him about his own field, but he tolerates me, and my need to participate vicariously in his education.

It's a wonderful journal, and I'm sure I've written posts about papers I read there in this space.

The number of graphene papers one can read is huge. At one of the institutions I toured with my son during his decision about which undergraduate school to attend for his materials science engineering bachelor's degree, they introduced a professor who said he was making kilogram scale graphene. I asked myself, "what exactly does a kilogram of graphene mean?" I'm sure it means something, but it immediately suggested, to me at least, graphite rather than graphene.

(My son went to another school, not because of that, but because he had a much better financial offer elsewhere. I'm sure he would have gotten a fine education there, but not quite as good as the one he's actually receiving.)

It is still a long way from commercial application for any graphene based products. My point is that these types of press releases, which often contain conditional words like "could" and "might" may be scientific breakthroughs - and of course scientific breakthroughs are important - but are in general a long way from the practical import that the conditional words want to suggest. I don't really have a tremendous problem with that; to the extent scientists get funding, the better it is for the world in general, not always, but in general.

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