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Fri Dec 4, 2020, 04:41 PM

Physicists recorded the flowing sound of a 'perfect' fluid for the first time

By Michelle Starr - ScienceAlert 6 hours ago

For the first time, physicists have recorded sound waves moving through a perfect fluid with the lowest possible viscosity, as permitted by the laws of quantum mechanics, an ascending glissando of the frequencies at which the fluid resonates.

This research can help us to understand some of the most extreme conditions in the Universe - the interiors of ultradense neutron stars, and the quark-gluon plasma 'soup' that filled the Universe in the years just after the Big Bang.

"It's quite difficult to listen to a neutron star," said physicist Martin Zwierlein of MIT.

"But now you could mimic it in a lab using atoms, shake that atomic soup and listen to it, and know how a neutron star would sound."
(You can listen to the recording here. https://soundcloud.com/mitnewsoffice/sound-of-a-perfect-fluid/s-kj8qGQBf8rP )

Fluids encompass a range of matter states. Most people probably think of them as liquids, but a fluid is any substance that is incompressible and conforms to the shape of its container: Gases and plasmas are also fluids.

More:
https://www.livescience.com/sound-of-perfect-fluid-recorded.html?utm_source=notification

13 replies, 722 views

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Reply Physicists recorded the flowing sound of a 'perfect' fluid for the first time (Original post)
Judi Lynn Dec 2020 OP
Arne Dec 2020 #1
soothsayer Dec 2020 #2
Duppers Dec 2020 #3
Judi Lynn Dec 2020 #5
NNadir Dec 2020 #8
Arne Dec 2020 #9
NNadir Dec 2020 #10
Arne Dec 2020 #11
NNadir Dec 2020 #12
Arne Dec 2020 #13
Duppers Dec 2020 #4
Judi Lynn Dec 2020 #6
Duppers Dec 2020 #7

Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Fri Dec 4, 2020, 04:44 PM

1. Glass is also a fluid.

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Response to Arne (Reply #1)

Fri Dec 4, 2020, 06:42 PM

2. And asphalt

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Response to Arne (Reply #1)

Sat Dec 5, 2020, 04:24 AM

3. Cats too. 😉😁

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Response to Duppers (Reply #3)

Sat Dec 5, 2020, 06:47 AM

5. What a wonderful link! Thank you, Duppers. Wild suprise! Great photos.

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Response to Arne (Reply #1)

Sun Dec 6, 2020, 01:31 PM

8. This is a widely believed but essentially untrue statement.

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Response to NNadir (Reply #8)

Sun Dec 6, 2020, 01:42 PM

9. Link?

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Response to Arne (Reply #9)

Sun Dec 6, 2020, 02:24 PM

10. Google scholar is your friend.

My son is a materials science engineer taking a graduate class in, um, "glass." He deigns to discuss science with his father.

One has actual freedom to educate one's self and need not be spoon fed. My statement is true.

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Response to NNadir (Reply #10)

Sun Dec 6, 2020, 02:37 PM

11. I use Duck Duck Go, haven't trusted Google in years.

amorphous solid, or supercooled liquid, it's debatable.

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Response to Arne (Reply #11)

Sun Dec 6, 2020, 02:43 PM

12. The issue of the states of matter is determinable by thermodynamic quantities.

The issue of "glass transitions" is a well understood phenomenon in fields as diverse as genetic engineering, proteomics, polymer science, and metallurgy.

This is why "God invented" the differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), to measure transitions.

Use whatever search engine you'd like. Glass is not a fluid. In general polymers are not fluids at all. Some melt, and the transitions are clear and measurable.

The ability to deform over a period of time is a property of almost every solid, including metals. Neither titanium nor tungsten are fluids.

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Response to NNadir (Reply #12)

Sun Dec 6, 2020, 02:50 PM

13. You are correct and I concede.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sat Dec 5, 2020, 04:25 AM

4. Thanks for posting this.

Sharing with dh.

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Response to Duppers (Reply #4)

Sat Dec 5, 2020, 06:49 AM

6. Thanks for reading it. 👋

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Response to Judi Lynn (Reply #6)

Sun Dec 6, 2020, 01:13 PM

7. My pleasure. 👋


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