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Tue Sep 8, 2020, 02:55 PM

THIS IS THE SMALLEST BIRD IN THE WORLD





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BY KAREN CORDAY/SEPT. 8, 2020 1:32 PM EDT

According to Guinness World Records, the world's smallest bird is the bee hummingbird, also known by its Latin name, Mellisuga helenae. Bee hummingbirds are exclusively found in Cuba and are so tiny that they are often mistaken for insects. Male bee hummingbirds measure an average of 57 millimeters (2.24 inches) in length and weigh about 1.6 grams (0.056 ounces), which is less than a dime; female birds are a bit larger. Reports One Kind Planet, these tiny birds build nests just 2.5 centimeters wide (less than an inch) out of lichen, bark, and cobwebs, in which they lay two eggs the size of green peas. 

Their breeding season takes place between March and June and male hummingbirds form groups called leks in which they "sing and perform competitive mating displays to attract females." Hummingbirds are polygamous, so one male might mate with many females during this season. The eggs incubate over a period of just three weeks and while the babies hatch blind with no feathers, they leave the nest as soon as their wing feathers grow in, which takes less than a month. 

TINY. VERY TINY



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Because the bee hummingbird is so small, it competes with insects for resources, as opposed to other birds. Per One Kind Planet, bee hummingbirds eat flower nectar and occasional insects, consuming up to half their body weight per day while helping pollinate over 1,500 flowers in the process. According to Wired, they can beat their little wings up to 200 times per second and often slip into a state of "torpor," or deep sleep, to conserve the enormous amounts of energy it takes to be so small and move so fast. 

 How and why did bee hummingbirds evolve to be so dramatically tiny? Ecologist Bo Dalsgaard told Wired that the Caribbean islands as a whole are known for hosting different sizes of hummingbirds. In Cuba, the larger native species is the emerald hummingbird, which grows to be twice the size of the bee hummingbird. Dalsgaard explained that the emerald hummingbird probably came to Cuba first and established itself as the alpha species; bee hummingbirds then evolved to be smaller in order to compete with insects for food, instead of their larger counterparts, and carved out their niche within Cuba's ecosystem. 

Read More: https://www.grunge.com/244373/this-is-the-smallest-bird-in-the-world/?utm_campaign=clip



















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Reply THIS IS THE SMALLEST BIRD IN THE WORLD (Original post)
Judi Lynn Sep 2020 OP
SheltieLover Sep 2020 #1
Judi Lynn Sep 2020 #20
SheltieLover Sep 2020 #34
Dave in VA Sep 2020 #2
Judi Lynn Sep 2020 #21
The Velveteen Ocelot Sep 2020 #3
Judi Lynn Sep 2020 #36
hlthe2b Sep 2020 #4
Judi Lynn Sep 2020 #35
MuseRider Sep 2020 #5
Judi Lynn Sep 2020 #22
2naSalit Sep 2020 #6
Judi Lynn Sep 2020 #23
Bayard Sep 2020 #7
Judi Lynn Sep 2020 #24
shenmue Sep 2020 #8
Judi Lynn Sep 2020 #25
scipan Sep 2020 #9
Judi Lynn Sep 2020 #33
Evolve Dammit Sep 2020 #10
Judi Lynn Sep 2020 #26
softydog88 Sep 2020 #11
Judi Lynn Sep 2020 #27
burrowowl Sep 2020 #12
iluvtennis Sep 2020 #14
Judi Lynn Sep 2020 #37
Judi Lynn Sep 2020 #28
RestoreAmerica2020 Sep 2020 #13
Judi Lynn Sep 2020 #29
niyad Sep 2020 #15
Judi Lynn Sep 2020 #30
Tanuki Sep 2020 #16
TexasBushwhacker Sep 2020 #18
Judi Lynn Sep 2020 #31
Judi Lynn Sep 2020 #19
cojoel Sep 2020 #17
Judi Lynn Sep 2020 #32
CatLady78 Oct 2020 #38

Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Sep 8, 2020, 03:01 PM

1. Gorgeous!

TY, Judi Lynn!

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Response to SheltieLover (Reply #1)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 04:51 PM

20. Thank you, Sheltie Lover. ❤️️

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Response to Judi Lynn (Reply #20)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 05:49 PM

34. Yw!

Ty for sharing!

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Sep 8, 2020, 03:02 PM

2. Thanks for sharing

nature is amazing!

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Response to Dave in VA (Reply #2)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 04:52 PM

21. Thank you, Dave in Va. You're right! It's beyond mind, for sure. n/t

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Sep 8, 2020, 03:05 PM

3. That might also be the cutest bird in the world!

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Response to The Velveteen Ocelot (Reply #3)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 05:52 PM

36. It would be for me, I'm certain. ❤️️

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Sep 8, 2020, 03:12 PM

4. Beautiful and Adorable!

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Response to hlthe2b (Reply #4)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 05:50 PM

35. It would be a shock to see one flying right by you. Could never be prepared to see one! n/t

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Sep 8, 2020, 03:18 PM

5. Wow! Thank you for posting this!

Amazing little birds. I was just watching the ruby-throated hummingbirds fight at my feeders as they get ready to head to Mexico or farther. Fat little things they are right now.

I had heard about Bee Hummingbirds but knew nothing at all about them. Thank you for the info and those beautiful pictures!

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Response to MuseRider (Reply #5)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 04:59 PM

22. Truly like something from another dimension. No doubt they really appreciate their last drinks

before heading south.

Unbelievable distance for such tiny travelers. . .

So glad you have offered them food during their stay north of the border.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Sep 8, 2020, 03:27 PM

6. Amazing!

I would take a vacation to Cuba just to see one of those!

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Response to 2naSalit (Reply #6)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 05:06 PM

23. They take real pride and interest in their special Cuban critters, which is ideal.

A lot of Canadian and European regular visitors to Cuba have expressed dread for the time US tourists will start pouring into Cuba, as they think it's wonderful as it is now!

Anyone who treats the island and the people with respect has always been deeply appreciated.

A lot of folks simply go to third countries like Canada, Mexico, or other Latin American or Caribbean countries and go from there to Cuba, and return the same way. Cuba doesn't stamp passports for U.S. Americans at the airport, I've heard.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Sep 8, 2020, 05:07 PM

7. Tiny beauties!

Thanks for posting.

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Response to Bayard (Reply #7)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 05:07 PM

24. Thank you, Bayard! ❤️️

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Sep 8, 2020, 05:09 PM

8. BIRB!!!!

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Response to shenmue (Reply #8)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 05:13 PM

25. Birbs, for sure! 🐦 ❤️️

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Sep 8, 2020, 05:21 PM

9. Awwww, so cute! I want one!

Kidding.

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Response to scipan (Reply #9)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 05:47 PM

33. It would be wonderful to see up close, a real experience. 👍

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Sep 8, 2020, 05:22 PM

10. Nice post. Thanks! Nature rules!

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Response to Evolve Dammit (Reply #10)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 05:14 PM

26. Thank you. 👋

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Sep 8, 2020, 05:31 PM

11. Superb photographs! Thanks for sharing.

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Response to softydog88 (Reply #11)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 05:17 PM

27. Thank you.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Sep 8, 2020, 05:33 PM

12. Oh Wow!

Thanks for post!

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Response to burrowowl (Reply #12)

Tue Sep 8, 2020, 05:47 PM

14. + 1. nt

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Response to iluvtennis (Reply #14)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 05:54 PM

37. 👋

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Response to burrowowl (Reply #12)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 05:29 PM

28. Thanks, burrowowl!

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Sep 8, 2020, 05:36 PM

13. Just fascinating tiny birds..put up feeder in back yard for 1st time-- enjoying

..watching them--yet these tiny bee hummingbirds are just stunning. Will read more. Thanks for sharing. Paz

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Response to RestoreAmerica2020 (Reply #13)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 05:31 PM

29. Had never heard of these tiny guys until seeing the article. Congrats on the hummer feeder! 👋

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Sep 8, 2020, 05:49 PM

15. KNR and thank you for sharing these amazing and beautiful little beings..

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Response to niyad (Reply #15)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 05:32 PM

30. I was overwhelmed learning about them. Can't believe birds can be that small! Thank you, niyad.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Sep 8, 2020, 05:49 PM

16. And here are their eggs:

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Response to Tanuki (Reply #16)

Tue Sep 8, 2020, 07:24 PM

18. Tic Tacs!

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Response to TexasBushwhacker (Reply #18)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 05:32 PM

31. That's right!

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Response to Tanuki (Reply #16)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 04:50 PM

19. OMG. That doesn't seem possible! Thanks. ❤️️

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Sep 8, 2020, 05:58 PM

17. What is most amazing

Inside that little bird's head is more brain power than inside of Eric's head. Or Junior's. Or their father's.

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Response to cojoel (Reply #17)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 05:46 PM

32. No doubt about it!

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sat Oct 31, 2020, 04:28 PM

38. Bookmarked.nt

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