HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Topics » Science » Science (Group) » Newly Released Rare Video...

Wed May 20, 2020, 12:09 AM

Newly Released Rare Video Is The Last Known Footage of a Tasmanian Tiger




CARLY CASSELLA20 MAY 2020

In 1936, Benjamin, the last known thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus), died from exposure in an Australian zoo.

Only the year before, he was filmed for the long-forgotten travelogue Tasmania the Wonderland by the prolific Brisbane-based filmmaker Sidney Cook.

Today, just a few scenes of the film survive: a double-decker tram system, Hobart's Sandy Bay beach, the long gone Beaumaris Zoo, and one of Australia's most famous extinct predators, the species widely known as Tasmanian tigers.

Benjamin the Tasmanian tiger's moment of fame lasts for only 21 seconds, but in the grand scheme of things that's practically a gold mine. Before this discovery, humans had little more than three minutes of silent black-and-white footage of thylacines.

More:
https://www.sciencealert.com/precious-21-second-clip-is-the-last-known-footage-of-a-tasmanian-tiger

5 replies, 703 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 5 replies Author Time Post
Reply Newly Released Rare Video Is The Last Known Footage of a Tasmanian Tiger (Original post)
Judi Lynn May 2020 OP
Judi Lynn May 2020 #1
Judi Lynn May 2020 #2
Duppers May 2020 #5
brush May 2020 #3
Judi Lynn May 2020 #4

Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Wed May 20, 2020, 12:15 AM

1. Newly-released film offers final glimpse of now-extinct Tasmanian tiger

Twenty-one seconds of film has been released in what is the last-known glimpse of Australia's most famous extinct predator.

Sharon Marris
News reporter @JournoKiwi

Wednesday 20 May 2020 04:09, UK

- video at link -

The 1935 clip is more than 12 months later than the previously last confirmed footage of a thylacine, from 1933.

Footage has been released of what is thought to be the last images of the now-extinct Tasmanian tiger.

The 21-second film was released by the National Film And Sound Archive Of Australia and is part of a forgotten travelogue Tasmania The Wonderland, made in 1935.

It shows a tiger named Benjamin pacing around his enclosure at Beaumaris Zoo in the Tasmanian city of Hobart.

The zookeeper rattles the tiger's cage seeking a reaction and the narrator says: "[The Tasmanian Tiger] is now very rare, being forced out of its natural habitat by the march of civilisation".

More:
https://news.sky.com/story/newly-released-film-offers-final-glimpse-of-now-extinct-tasmanian-tiger-11991327

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Wed May 20, 2020, 12:29 AM

2. Long-lost video of extinct Tasmanian tiger found in film archive

By Michael Irving
May 19, 2020



A "new" video of the extinct Tasmanian tiger, or thylacine, has been discovered in a film archivePhotosVac/Depositphotos
VIEW 1 IMAGES

The Tasmanian tiger may be gone, but itís not forgotten. New footage of the extinct marsupial has emerged from the vault of the National Film and Sound Archive of Australia (NFSA), showing the last known member of the species in a dingy cage.

Clocking in at just 21 seconds, the new video shows a thylacine pacing around its cage in Beaumaris Zoo in Hobart, Tasmania. Two men can be seen rattling the cage on the right.

Itís believed that this clip is the last ever filmed of Benjamin, the last surviving Tasmanian tiger. The existing famous video of him was shot in December 1933, while the newly discovered clip dates to 1935. That places it just a year or so before poor Benjaminís death in September 1936.




New" footage of extinct Tasmanian Tiger

The clip was taken from a travelogue titled Tasmania The Wonderland, which outlined some of the attractions of the island state for visitors. As the narrator makes clear, Benjamin was the only thylacine in captivity at the time, and the species was considered rare in the wild, but they likely didnít realize that they had the very last one on their hands.

More:
https://newatlas.com/science/tasmanian-tiger-video/

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Judi Lynn (Reply #2)

Fri May 22, 2020, 02:42 AM

5. Bookmarking

For later.

TY!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Wed May 20, 2020, 12:44 AM

3. It looks more canine than feline.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to brush (Reply #3)

Wed May 20, 2020, 06:06 PM

4. It really does, doesn't it? Long, pointed muzzle.... I'm baffled. n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread