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Wed Feb 26, 2020, 05:27 AM

Is Jupiter A Water World? NASA Finds 'Abundance' As New Images Show Giant Planet As A 'Blue Marble'


Jamie Carter Contributor




Long thought to be virtually dry, it turns out that Jupiter has significant water.

New data from NASAís Juno spacecraft, which launched in 2011 and is orbiting the planet right now, suggests that water makes up about 0.25% of the molecules in Jupiterís atmosphere. Thatís about three times more than thought to be at the Sun.

ďJust when we think we have things figured out, Jupiter reminds us how much we still have to learn,Ē said Scott Bolton, Juno principal investigator at the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio.

Since Jupiter was probably the first planet to form in the solar system it contains most of the gas and dust in it that isnít now part of the Sun. As such, how much water is locked-up in Jupiter is essential for astronomers trying to understand how the solar system formed.

More:
https://www.forbes.com/sites/jamiecartereurope/2020/02/25/is-jupiter-a-water-world-nasa-finds-abundance-as-new-images-show-giant-planet-as-a-blue-marble/#6f1b60236bf9

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Arrow 14 replies Author Time Post
Reply Is Jupiter A Water World? NASA Finds 'Abundance' As New Images Show Giant Planet As A 'Blue Marble' (Original post)
Judi Lynn Feb 2020 OP
Silver Gaia Feb 2020 #1
denem Feb 2020 #2
Silver Gaia Feb 2020 #3
AZ8theist Feb 2020 #8
Dem2theMax Feb 2020 #10
trotsky Feb 2020 #4
packman Feb 2020 #5
FiveGoodMen Feb 2020 #6
packman Feb 2020 #7
Karadeniz Feb 2020 #9
lark Feb 2020 #11
BlancheSplanchnik Feb 2020 #12
joho260 Feb 2020 #13
FiveGoodMen Feb 2020 #14

Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Wed Feb 26, 2020, 07:50 AM

1. Wow.

I am so intrigued!

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Wed Feb 26, 2020, 08:26 AM

2. Jupiter is a really ugly planet.

 

I have always thought so, but the high resolution photos are ... yeek.

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Response to denem (Reply #2)

Wed Feb 26, 2020, 08:45 AM

3. Really?

I think this is beautiful.

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Response to Silver Gaia (Reply #3)

Wed Feb 26, 2020, 02:25 PM

8. Agreed. It is a fascinating place....

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Response to Silver Gaia (Reply #3)

Wed Feb 26, 2020, 06:33 PM

10. Me too!

It's stunning.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Wed Feb 26, 2020, 09:23 AM

4. Seems reasonable.

Lots of water in comets, and Jupiter has been known to absorb more than a few of those.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Wed Feb 26, 2020, 12:08 PM

5. Wait - WHAT???

"Thatís about three times more than thought to be at the Sun" Are they saying the sun, that big , hot ball of fusion, has WATER molecules in it?

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Response to packman (Reply #5)

Wed Feb 26, 2020, 12:24 PM

6. Apparently, but only briefly...

The strong magnetic fields affect pushes most of the sun's gas aside, creating a slightly less hot space in the middle of the spot. There, things are just cool enough for the remaining atoms, including oxygen and hydrogen, to momentarily bond.

This doesn't mean that there are liquid oceans on the sun, of course. It's still too hot for that. In fact, it's still so hot that if you could throw a hunk of iron into the center of a sunspot, it would immediately vaporize.

So, no one water molecule lasts for very long. Sunspots do contain trace amounts of H2O in vapor form, and that's still water on the sun!

https://indianapublicmedia.org/amomentofscience/water-on-the-sun.php

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Response to FiveGoodMen (Reply #6)

Wed Feb 26, 2020, 12:30 PM

7. Thanks for the explain - Too much to comprehend on an early morning

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Wed Feb 26, 2020, 03:46 PM

9. More interesting info, as usual...thanks for keeping us in the loop!❤

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Thu Feb 27, 2020, 09:28 AM

11. Awesome, it so so much more beautiful than any decipiction has shown previously.

I have never seen Jupiter depicted with any blue at all, this is fascinating. Thanks for sharing.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Thu Feb 27, 2020, 09:50 AM

12. Pretty!!

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Thu Feb 27, 2020, 11:35 AM

13. Danger!

It's all in the form of Ice Nine; don't bring any crystals back to Earth.

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Response to joho260 (Reply #13)

Thu Feb 27, 2020, 02:00 PM

14. You could still melt that with a fire and it turned back to normal water.

This would be about ICE 9000

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