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Mon Oct 28, 2019, 06:35 PM

Uranus Shines at Its Brightest Tonight: Here's How to See It


By Elizabeth Howell an hour ago



Uranus reached opposition on Oct. 28 at 4 a.m. EDT (0800 GMT). On Oct. 27, Uranus was closest to Earth for this year 1.75 billion miles (2.8 billion km). Its minimal distance from Earth will cause it to shine at a peak brightness of magnitude 5.7 and to appear slightly larger in telescopes.

(Image credit: Starry Night)


You can catch Uranus, one of the solar system's most distant planets, at its brightest tonight.

Uranus reached opposition today (Oct. 28) at 4 a.m. EDT (0800 GMT), which means it is almost directly opposite the sun from Earth's perspective. Not only is the planet's face fully illuminated by sunlight, but Uranus is also closer to Earth now than any other time of year.

The planet was at its closest point to Earth, called perigee, on Sunday (Oct. 27), according to the skywatching site EarthSky.org. For the time being, the planet will be visible all night and will rise in the east during sunset, according to EarthSky. Luckily, the moon just reached its new phase on Sunday and won't wash out the faint planet with a bright sky.

Uranus is visible in the constellation Aries between roughly 8 p.m. and 5:30 a.m. local time, according to In-the-Sky.org. You'll be best able to view it with binoculars or a telescope, but under excellent "seeing" conditions (dark sky, little atmospheric disturbance) it may be just visible with the naked eye. Uranus is shining at magnitude 5.7, at the threshold of naked-eye visibility.

More:
https://www.space.com/uranus-at-opposition-2019.html?utm_source=notification





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Reply Uranus Shines at Its Brightest Tonight: Here's How to See It (Original post)
Judi Lynn Oct 28 OP
Beryllinthranox Oct 28 #1
The Velveteen Ocelot Oct 28 #2
ProudMNDemocrat Oct 28 #3
DBoon Oct 28 #4
ThoughtCriminal Oct 28 #5

Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Mon Oct 28, 2019, 06:38 PM

1. Very cool!

I have a nice 4.5" reflector, and a sky full of clouds. Bummer.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Mon Oct 28, 2019, 06:39 PM

2. Maybe that's what's happening here:

https://www.democraticunderground.com/10181275521

(Sorry, I just couldn't help myself.)

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Mon Oct 28, 2019, 06:43 PM

3. Where all farts come from.......

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Mon Oct 28, 2019, 07:31 PM

4. can be seen with the naked eye ...

if you are 12 years old and in Death Valley or some other isolated spot.

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Response to DBoon (Reply #4)

Mon Oct 28, 2019, 07:59 PM

5. Done that

With much younger eyes in dark Arizona skies. Need a good chart to sky hop to the right object (pre-computer era)
I have also observed Neptune and a few of the larger asteroids with mounted binoculars. It's not that they are very interesting visually, I just like to know that I have.

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