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Sat Aug 17, 2019, 03:53 PM

When it Comes to Gamma Radiation, the Moon is Actually Brighter Than the Sun



AUGUST 17, 2019 BY EVAN GOUGH


The eerie, hellish glow coming from the Moon may seem unreal in this image, since itís invisible to our eyes. But instruments that detect gamma rays tell us itís real. More than just a grainy, red picture, itís a vivid reminder that thereís more going on than meets human eyes.

Itís also a reminder that any humans that visit the Moon need to be protected from this high-energy radiation.

From Cosmic Rays to Gamma Rays
NASAís Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope captured these images of the Moonís gamma rays. In this part of the electromagnetic spectrum, the Moon is actually brighter than the Sun. Thatís because the Sun produces most of its energy in other parts of the spectrum, though it does emit some gamma rays, especially during solar flares.

Most gamma rays in our Solar System come from distant sources like quasars and active galactic nuclei (AGN.) The Moon is an indirect source of gamma radiation, and produces gamma rays through its interaction with cosmic rays.

Cosmic rays are a type of high-energy radiation that for the most part is produced outside our Solar System. Theyíre produced by things like supernovae and active galactic nuclei. When cosmic rays strike matter, like the surface of the Moon in this instance, they create gamma rays.

More:
https://www.universetoday.com/143183/when-it-comes-to-gamma-radiation-the-moon-is-actually-brighter-than-the-sun/

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Reply When it Comes to Gamma Radiation, the Moon is Actually Brighter Than the Sun (Original post)
Judi Lynn Aug 17 OP
Girard442 Aug 17 #1
NNadir Aug 17 #3
NNadir Aug 17 #2

Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sat Aug 17, 2019, 04:40 PM

1. But what about The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds?

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Response to Girard442 (Reply #1)

Sat Aug 17, 2019, 05:20 PM

3. A wonderful play from a time when science was respected.

It would go nowhere today.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sat Aug 17, 2019, 05:18 PM

2. That accounts for Neil Armstrong's death I guess.

I probably should use the sarcasm emoji, but don't actually like emoji's all that much.

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