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Tue Aug 6, 2019, 11:12 PM

Monster species of jellyfish invade South Korea coast

UPI
By United Press International - August 6, 2019

South Korea’s maritime ministry has issued an alert as a rising number of Nomura’s Jellyfish are being located near the coasts of major cities, including Busan and Ulsan.

Nomura’s Jellyfish, a giant species that can grow up to nearly 7 feet in diameter and resides primarily in waters between China and Japan, are invading the South Korean coast as extreme summer heat continues to affect the region. Climate change has been cited as a possible reason for the population increase in Nomura’s Jellyfish.

...South Korea’s national fisheries research and development institute confirmed on Aug. 1 the jellyfish, which can sometimes cause death by envenomation, was expanding rapidly near Busan, South Korea’s second-largest city.

https://gephardtdaily.com/national-international/monster-species-of-jellyfish-invade-south-korea-coast/

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Reply Monster species of jellyfish invade South Korea coast (Original post)
bronxiteforever Aug 6 OP
Ilsa Aug 6 #1
msongs Aug 7 #2
Ilsa Aug 7 #3

Response to bronxiteforever (Original post)

Tue Aug 6, 2019, 11:36 PM

1. Giant jellyfish and feral hogs are plagues caused by climate change. nt

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Response to Ilsa (Reply #1)

Wed Aug 7, 2019, 12:18 AM

2. feral hogs have been around for thousands of years or more nt

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Response to msongs (Reply #2)

Wed Aug 7, 2019, 06:19 AM

3. Yes, and their population in the south has increased

Dramatically over the last couple of decades, in part, due to climate change. It is thought that warmer winters permit greater numbers to survive.

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