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Sat Dec 30, 2017, 09:07 PM

 

Gas Giants aren't Planets, they're Failed Stars

My opinion; this didn't come from any scientific study or paper. But it's ridiculous to include as planets big orbs of gas the no one will ever stand on, while excluding Pluto and Eris. "But the gas giants have gravity, lots of it!" I hear you exclaim. Yes. So does the Sun, and it is not considered a planet!

IMHO, our solar system has six planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Pluto, Eris. My (admittedly personal and subjective) criteria are that a planet orbits the Sun instead of another planet, and is at least 1,000 miles in diameter.

Sorry for the rant, but I just read another article that triggered me. Usually, I'm Mr Sunshine!

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Reply Gas Giants aren't Planets, they're Failed Stars (Original post)
Soylent Henry Dec 2017 OP
Aristus Dec 2017 #1
exboyfil Dec 2017 #2
PoindexterOglethorpe Dec 2017 #3
Foolacious Dec 2017 #4

Response to Soylent Henry (Original post)

Sat Dec 30, 2017, 09:11 PM

1. It actually has been expressed that way in a number of scientific publications.

'Failed stars'. I read that in a book about astronomy when I was just a kid.

Still, by your own definition, these failed stars are planets, in that they orbit the Sun.

I exclude Eris but include Pluto. Pluto will always be a planet to me.

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Response to Aristus (Reply #1)

Sat Dec 30, 2017, 09:47 PM

2. No reason to include Pluto but exclude Eris out of any definition

Both orbit sun. Both are composed of comparable materials. Eris actually weighs more than Pluto and is within 6% of volume of Pluto. Both have moons.

Planet is an arbitrary designation. Mercury has 10 times the volume of Pluto, and 25 times the mass.

For symmetry we have four rocky planets (Earth, Venus, Mars, and Mercury)

Four gas giants (these are not brown dwarf failed stars since they do not contain sufficiently pure hydrogen) (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune)

Four (probably more over time) Kuiper belt icy planetoids (Pluto, Eris, Hauemea, and Makemake)

We have brown dwarfs larger than active stars.

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Response to Soylent Henry (Original post)

Sat Dec 30, 2017, 10:27 PM

3. Gas giants are not failed stars.

They lack sufficient mass by quite a bit, according to my physicist/astronomer sun.

And actually, I believe that Jupiter and Saturn are gas giants, but Neptune and Uranus are ice giants, if I'm remembering correctly.

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Response to Soylent Henry (Original post)

Sun Dec 31, 2017, 12:17 PM

4. They're not "failed"...

they're "differently ambitioned".

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