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Wed Nov 25, 2015, 02:18 AM

 

Einstein's theory of general relativity is turning 100 years old.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/physics/inside-einsteins-mind.html


Einstein's General Theory of Relativity is our best guess at the nature of space and time and it is turning 100 years old today. (To be precise, this is the 100th anniversary of its publication)



The European Space Agency's Faint Object Camera on board NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has provided astronomers with the most detailed image ever taken of the gravitational lens G2237 + 0305 — sometimes referred to as the Einstein Cross. The photograph shows four images of a very distant quasar which has been multiple-imaged by a relatively nearby galaxy acting as a gravitational lens. The angular separation between the upper and lower images is 1.6 arcseconds.

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Reply Einstein's theory of general relativity is turning 100 years old. (Original post)
aidbo Nov 2015 OP
longship Nov 2015 #1
xocet Nov 2015 #2
aidbo Nov 2015 #4
xocet Nov 2015 #6
longship Nov 2015 #5
xocet Nov 2015 #7
longship Nov 2015 #8
xocet Nov 2015 #11
Xipe Totec Nov 2015 #3
aidbo Nov 2015 #10
aidbo Nov 2015 #9
longship Nov 2015 #12

Response to aidbo (Original post)

Wed Nov 25, 2015, 06:05 AM

1. Will watch with great interest.

BTW, he did not develop relativity on his own. Special relativity had underpinnings from Lorentz, and general relativity from mathematicians like Hilbert. However, what Einstein did in 1905 and 1915 was to put together a framework that revolutionized how we see the universe. That was what was important.

Yup! The universe really does work this way.

R&K

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Response to longship (Reply #1)

Wed Nov 25, 2015, 10:53 AM

2. How about Poincaré and Riemann, respectively? n/t

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Response to xocet (Reply #2)

Wed Nov 25, 2015, 11:48 AM

4. Let us also not forget Emmy Noether

 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emmy_Noether

Emmy Noether (German: [ˈnřːtɐ]; official name Amalie Emmy Noether;[1] 23 March 1882 – 14 April 1935) was a German Jewish mathematician known for her landmark contributions to abstract algebra and theoretical physics. She was described by Pavel Alexandrov, Albert Einstein, Jean Dieudonné, Hermann Weyl, and Norbert Wiener as the most important woman in the history of mathematics.[2][3] As one of the leading mathematicians of her time, she developed the theories of rings, fields, and algebras. In physics, Noether's theorem explains the connection between symmetry and conservation laws.[4]

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Response to aidbo (Reply #4)

Wed Nov 25, 2015, 01:42 PM

6. True...

Here is a potentially interesting presentation on Noether's Life and Work:



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Response to xocet (Reply #2)

Wed Nov 25, 2015, 12:40 PM

5. Yup! Them, too.

Shoulders of giants.

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Response to longship (Reply #5)

Wed Nov 25, 2015, 01:46 PM

7. So...are you up for a relevant but bad mathematics joke? If not, don't read below...

Did you know that differential geometers are generally very weight/health conscious?

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Response to xocet (Reply #7)

Wed Nov 25, 2015, 02:11 PM

8. Oh boy.


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Response to longship (Reply #8)

Wed Nov 25, 2015, 07:57 PM

11. They mostly use local coordinates... n/t

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Response to aidbo (Original post)

Wed Nov 25, 2015, 11:34 AM

3. Not a long time, relatively speaking...


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Response to Xipe Totec (Reply #3)

Wed Nov 25, 2015, 03:11 PM

10. You have a warped sense of humor.

 

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Response to aidbo (Original post)

Wed Nov 25, 2015, 02:33 PM

9. a fun video helpful in visualizing space-time warping.

 



but remember, this is just a 2D analogy..

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Response to aidbo (Original post)

Wed Nov 25, 2015, 08:03 PM

12. Two hours of Einstein tonight on PBS Nova.

Beginning at 9:00 PM EST.

Tune in!

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