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Fri Jul 19, 2013, 03:07 PM

Magnificent Milky Way Glows Over Machu Picchu (Photo)

Magnificent Milky Way Glows Over Machu Picchu (Photo)
by Nina Sen | July 19, 2013 03:00pm ET



The glowing arc of the Milky Way points to the great ruins of the Incan Empire, Machu Picchu, in this vivid night sky image.

Thomas O'Brien took this photo in early July 2013 from the summit of Putucusi Mountain, which is located across the Urubamba River Valley from the historic sanctuary of Machu Picchu, Peru. The UNESCO World Heritage Site is the dark, saddle-shaped area between mountains on the right side of the image where the arc of the Milky Way intersects with the horizon.

The Milky Way, our own galaxy containing the solar system, is a barred spiral galaxy with roughly 400 billion stars. The stars, along with gas and dust, appear like a band of light in the sky from Earth. The galaxy stretches between 100,000 to 120,000 light-years in diameter.

- See more at: http://www.space.com/21961-milky-way-machu-picchu-photo.html#sthash.CcFRxGpx.dpuf

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Arrow 13 replies Author Time Post
Reply Magnificent Milky Way Glows Over Machu Picchu (Photo) (Original post)
Judi Lynn Jul 2013 OP
deutsey Jul 2013 #1
Fantastic Anarchist Jul 2013 #2
doc03 Jul 2013 #3
Cleita Jul 2013 #5
allan01 Jul 2013 #4
BlueToTheBone Jul 2013 #6
Spitfire of ATJ Jul 2013 #7
Fumesucker Jul 2013 #12
AnotherDreamWeaver Jul 2013 #8
obxhead Jul 2013 #9
Heywood J Jul 2013 #10
N_E_1 for Tennis Jul 2013 #11
Overseas Jul 2013 #13

Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Fri Jul 19, 2013, 03:09 PM

1. Wow...can you imagine how that must have blown the Incans' minds?

The picture alone does that for me.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Fri Jul 19, 2013, 03:27 PM

2. Kicking to read later. nt

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Fri Jul 19, 2013, 04:09 PM

3. It is amazing how many stars there are when you get away from the light pollution

of cities. A few years ago I was in Colorado and it was like there were a thousand times more stars.

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Response to doc03 (Reply #3)

Fri Jul 19, 2013, 04:15 PM

5. It isn't just lights but the altitude that enhances it.

I used to live at 9 thousand feet altitude in the Atacama desert on the Tropic of Capricorn. Not only is the Milky Way a stupendous sight, but the stars seem close enough to pick out of the sky.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Fri Jul 19, 2013, 04:10 PM

4. re:Magnificent Milky Way Glows Over Machu Picchu (Photo)

thanks for sharing .

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Fri Jul 19, 2013, 04:15 PM

6. Now we know why they built there. What a way to live!

Totally connected with the universe.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Fri Jul 19, 2013, 04:52 PM

7. I really am hoping someone comes up with a way to look into the sky and see it like this....

 

Someone here said something like "if your eyes were the size of dinner plates".

Something that didn't distort or magnify but simply collected way more light than the eye can alone. And I don't mean a camera or night vision goggles. Just big ass opticals collecting natural light. (Okay, a zoom would be nice too).

You would have to use care as a street light could be too much.

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Response to Spitfire of ATJ (Reply #7)

Sat Jul 20, 2013, 03:12 PM

12. High quality binoculars are about as close as it gets to that

I've spent a considerable amount of time thinking about what you mention and I don't believe it is physically possible.

I have a six inch Newtonian reflector and at low powers (20 X or so) the full Moon will leave spots in front of your eyes for some time after you look at it through the scope, it can be physically painful it's so bright, you can see the beam come out of the eyepiece.

Something like a long Nagler eyepiece on a short focal length refractor gives a "space walk" experience under dark and transparent skies. They look a bit ridiculous since the eyepiece is nearly as big as the objective lens.









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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Fri Jul 19, 2013, 05:58 PM

8. I had the good fortune to be there in 1977, such a long time ago. n/t

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Fri Jul 19, 2013, 06:11 PM

9. Added

 

The bucket list gets 1 line longer.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sat Jul 20, 2013, 09:42 AM

10. This is mind-boggling.

Since the recession, I'm lucky to see a dozen, maybe two dozen stars on a really clear night. Growing up, it was not unusual to never see stars at all - only a luminous purple-orange fog overhead. Constellations were stick figures in a book.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sat Jul 20, 2013, 10:22 AM

11. Thank you

That's my new wallpaper on the pad! Just beautiful.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sun Jul 21, 2013, 12:19 PM

13. So beautiful. I remember seeing the Milky Way outdoors long ago.

Very sad that we can't see it nowadays. It really made me feel like we were part of the cosmos.

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