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Thu Jan 26, 2012, 09:56 PM

President Obama honors fallen astronauts of Apollo 1, Challenger and Columbia

Last edited Fri Jan 27, 2012, 12:49 AM - Edit history (1)

From the NASA website: President Obama on NASA's Day of Remembrance, Jan 26,2012:

On this solemn day, we join the NASA family and all Americans in honoring the brave men and women who gave their lives in the pursuit of space exploration.

It is important to remember that pushing the boundaries of space requires great courage and has come with a steep price three times in our Nation’s history – for the crews of Apollo 1 and the space shuttles Challenger and Columbia. The loss of these pioneers is felt every day by their family, friends, and colleagues, but we take comfort in the knowledge that their spirit will continue to inspire us to new heights.

Today, our Nation is pursuing an ambitious path that honors these heroes, builds on their sacrifices, and promises to expand the limits of innovation as we venture farther into space than we have ever gone before. The men and women who lost their lives in the name of space exploration helped get us to this day, and it is our duty to honor them the way they would have wanted to be honored – by focusing our sights on the next horizon.


Do you remember?

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Reply President Obama honors fallen astronauts of Apollo 1, Challenger and Columbia (Original post)
LongTomH Jan 2012 OP
applegrove Jan 2012 #1
Swede Jan 2012 #2
fizzgig Jan 2012 #3
limpyhobbler Jan 2012 #4

Response to LongTomH (Original post)

Thu Jan 26, 2012, 10:38 PM

1. I was in college when the craft Chrisine McCallagh was on blew up. We watched

the news all afternoon in my residence. So sorry for her students who were all watching the liftoff. very sad.

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Response to LongTomH (Original post)

Fri Jan 27, 2012, 12:34 AM

2. I must go down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky

Sea Fever


I must go down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky,
And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by,
And the wheel's kick and the wind's song and the white sail's shaking,
And a grey mist on the sea's face, and a grey dawn breaking.

I must down to the seas again, for the call of the running tide
Is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied;
And all I ask is a windy day with the white clouds flying,
And the flung spray and the blown spume, and the sea-gulls crying.

I must down to the seas again, to the vagrant gypsy life,
To the gull's way and the whale's way where the wind's like a whetted knife;
And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover
And quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick's over.

By John Masefield (1878-1967).

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Response to LongTomH (Original post)

Fri Jan 27, 2012, 12:41 AM

3. the challenger is one of my earliest memories

i was five and remember watching the footage replay on the tvs at montgomery wards. i was in college when columbia happened, i had to open up at subway but had to sit in my car and cry for sometime before i could get in to do it.

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Response to LongTomH (Original post)

Fri Jan 27, 2012, 08:45 AM

4. Remembering the 1986 Challenger Disaster

My 6th grade study hall teacher wheeled out a big TV on a cart for us to watch the launch.

The shuttle program was still pretty new and every launch had an excitement about it. I lived in New Hampshire at the time and Christa McAuliffe had become a local star through her participation in the shuttle program. People were very proud of her and excited that a local girl had been chosen as the first civilian to go into space.

We were all very shocked when it happened, the explosion. The teacher awkwardly shut the TV off, and went to check in with his boss I guess, to figure out how to talk to the kids about it. A short while later we were called down to the gym for an assembly. We were sent home for the day. School was canceled the following day as well.

Our nation has been through alot since then. The decade of the nineteen-eighties was a time of great challenges and change in America. It was unpleasant in many ways. But with all the changes and events that have happened since, the nostalgic appeal of that era is becoming more apparent.

Despite everything that divided us in America, despite Reagan, despite racism, despite the nuclear arms race, the shuttle program was one thing that united us, one thing that made us all proud.

As troubled as our nation was in 1986, it resembles an age of innocence and simplicity compared to the challenges facing us now. No news event invokes the memory of that era more than the loss of the Challenger and its crew. So they can never be forgotten.




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