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Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:18 PM

Religious Symbolism in the Islamic Prayer Rug

Last edited Fri Mar 9, 2018, 11:58 AM - Edit history (1)

Prayer in Islam is an important aspect of faith for Muslims. With the devout praying at five set times daily, Muslims pray, on average, far more often than average followers of other religions. Many Muslims own their own personal prayer rug or mat, which contains a great deal of symbolism knotted into the design of the rug.

Here's an interesting page from Britannica.com, on Prayer Rugs and their symbolism. You can visit it to learn more about this unique aid to prayer in the Islamic faith:

https://www.britannica.com/topic/prayer-rug

My Personal History with Rugs

Many years ago, a friend gave me an antique, hand-knotted prayer rug from the Caucasus region. I began to learn about rugs, so I could be more knowledgeable about the gift. As I learned how they were made, with each strand of yarn hand-knotted into the pile on its loom, I decided that the best way to learn more would be to weave my own rug. So, I did. I designed a simple 12" square rug with a relatively simple pattern, with 100 knots to the square inch. That's pretty coarse, but... I build a primitive loom of sticks from a cedar tree in my yard, and assembled the loom and all of its components after seeing many photos of people creating such rugs. Then, working from my pattern, I began knotting the pile on the weft on the crude loom. As I worked on it, I reflected on the people who wove and knotted much larger, more complex and finer rugs. Rug weavers are mostly children and women and the process, even for a small rug like a prayer rug, can take hundreds of hours. My 1-square foot rug took me about a week of spare time work. But, it took many hours and gave me a lot of time to think about everything that goes into the process. Here's a photo of that little project:



At the time, I was writing how-to articles for several magazines, so I photographed the process as I went. Once it was completed, I sold an article on the project to the now-defunct Better Homes and Gardens Crafts magazine, which published it later that year. That's what I did back then. Everything I did became a how-to article. That little rug, still on its primitive loom, now hangs on the inside of the entry door at our home. It's a conversation piece which lets me talk about rug weaving occasionally. Later, I started a larger rug on a larger loom. It was to be a rug of the typical size of a prayer rug. I created a pattern for it, built a sturdy loom like the ones used by nomadic rug weavers, and began working on it. I never finished it. I got it about 1/3 complete and then got busy with work and other activities, and just never came back to it. The loom sat in my living room for years, mocking me silently for its incompletion. Occasionally, I'd take a couple of hours and knot another row, but that happened less and less often as the years passed. But every time I worked on it, I once again contemplated the workers and the religious use of rugs like the one I was weaving. Here's that project, still on the loom:



Eventually. my wife and I moved from California to Minnesota. That 4' X 6' simple loom was not a high priority to travel with us. The rug was only about 1/3 finished. I wove a plain section above the pattern to match the section below it. Then, I cut the weaving from the loom, and knotted the fringe carefully, and rolled it up for our move. In our new home the 3' x 2' unfinished weaving sits on an end table most of the time. I look at it now and then. I no longer regret not finishing the project. Every Christmas, it is used on the floor under our holiday tree. I cannot look at my partially finished rug, though, without considering all of the people who have spent much of their lives creating such rugs. I understand rugs better for having participated in weaving one small one and part of larger one. I have other hand-woven, hand-knotted rugs in my home that I have accumulated over the years. I walk on them. The dogs sleep on them. They are part of my life. I appreciate rugs more each time I look at the two I've worked on.

This little essay on rugs was inspired by recent events. I hope you found it interesting.

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Arrow 56 replies Author Time Post
Reply Religious Symbolism in the Islamic Prayer Rug (Original post)
MineralMan Mar 2018 OP
Heddi Mar 2018 #1
MineralMan Mar 2018 #3
Heddi Mar 2018 #12
MineralMan Mar 2018 #14
Heddi Mar 2018 #17
MineralMan Mar 2018 #18
NeoGreen Mar 2018 #5
Heddi Mar 2018 #13
MineralMan Mar 2018 #16
Heddi Mar 2018 #19
MineralMan Mar 2018 #20
Heddi Mar 2018 #21
Act_of_Reparation Mar 2018 #9
MineralMan Mar 2018 #22
Act_of_Reparation Mar 2018 #23
MineralMan Mar 2018 #24
Act_of_Reparation Mar 2018 #25
Lordquinton Mar 2018 #34
Mariana Mar 2018 #36
NeoGreen Mar 2018 #37
Act_of_Reparation Mar 2018 #2
MineralMan Mar 2018 #4
Act_of_Reparation Mar 2018 #6
MineralMan Mar 2018 #8
Act_of_Reparation Mar 2018 #10
MineralMan Mar 2018 #11
Act_of_Reparation Mar 2018 #15
NeoGreen Mar 2018 #7
nil desperandum Mar 2018 #26
MineralMan Mar 2018 #27
nil desperandum Mar 2018 #31
MineralMan Mar 2018 #35
Binkie The Clown Mar 2018 #28
MineralMan Mar 2018 #29
Binkie The Clown Mar 2018 #30
Voltaire2 Mar 2018 #32
Iggo Mar 2018 #33
aka-chmeee Mar 2018 #38
MineralMan Mar 2018 #39
Nitram Mar 2018 #40
MineralMan Mar 2018 #41
Nitram Mar 2018 #42
MineralMan Mar 2018 #43
MineralMan Mar 2018 #44
Nitram Mar 2018 #45
MineralMan Mar 2018 #46
Bretton Garcia Mar 2018 #47
MineralMan Mar 2018 #48
Bretton Garcia Mar 2018 #49
MineralMan Mar 2018 #50
Bretton Garcia Mar 2018 #51
Mariana Mar 2018 #52
MineralMan Mar 2018 #53
Mariana Mar 2018 #55
MineralMan Mar 2018 #54
Voltaire2 Mar 2018 #56

Response to MineralMan (Original post)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:24 PM

1. I find the topics of rugs fascinating

thanks for bringing this up, MM.

Some people think that all rugs do is just basically lie, I guess. Like on the floor. Just lie on the floor. I guess that's where the phrase "lie like a rug" comes from. Interesting phrase.

Rugs also are a colloquial term that refers to a toupče, which many men use to cover up their baldness. Some people find the use of a toupče to be deceptive, that someone who uses a "rug," if you will, is hiding something, covering up something...basically "lying" to others about their baldness. I don't know that I'm in that camp per se.

I do find it interesting how the use of words can mean so many different things. Look at the simple term "rug" and how two generic (but different) uses of it both have meanings that imply deceptiveness.

So fascinating.

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Response to Heddi (Reply #1)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:26 PM

3. Thanks. I was glad to share my experience of weaving rugs.

It was decades ago, but was an interesting period of my life, as most periods have been. We don't think about rugs much, most of the time. Perhaps we should consider them more often. We all have to deal with them.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #3)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:45 PM

12. I was glad to read about your experience, and I've been thinking about them a lot, too

Another thought I had seemed to pop to me today. JUST IN time, I guess you could say, as I was reading what could have been a replay of a series of arguments that I swear were already argued in this group years ago. I had to check the user names because I could have sworn I was seeing ghosts!

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Response to Heddi (Reply #12)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:46 PM

14. So, it's not just me, then?

I'm relieved, I have to tell you.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #14)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:49 PM

17. No, not just you

I think the only people who feel they're fooling anyone are the fools themselves.

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Response to Heddi (Reply #17)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:49 PM

18. That is so often the case, it seems.

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Response to Heddi (Reply #1)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:29 PM

5. On an unrelated note...

...I, for one, hope you are having a very good day.

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Response to NeoGreen (Reply #5)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:46 PM

13. I am having a very nice day, thank you!

I'm painting the master bedroom a light sage green. We had painted it when we first bought the house a kind of....light denim? ecch. Totally not what the room needed. Sigh....

it's a very large room

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Response to Heddi (Reply #13)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:48 PM

16. Aw, Geez. I really have to think about interior painting

soon. Our house, after 14 years of our residence, is crying out for new paint. Hmph! Maybe I'll hang a rug on one of the offending walls. I have a couple of very decorative ones.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #16)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:51 PM

19. I'm bad at picking art but I like these kinds of things

They're wall stickers. or decals. I'm thinking of having some of these (not those trite wordy ones...) in my home office.

https://www.wayfair.com/decor-pillows/sb0/wall-decals-c504340.html

Instead of rugs (which can get heavy) you can always try tapestries. Then you'd be like a hippie. Don't forget the patchouli incense.

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Response to Heddi (Reply #19)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:53 PM

20. What a great idea. Words on walls.

I could not be more like a hippie than I already am, I'm afraid. However, I do detest the scent of patchouli. Feh!

Peace!

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #20)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:54 PM

21. Peace to you as well

Time to get that second coat of light green sage on the wall.....

ohm.....

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Response to Heddi (Reply #1)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:33 PM

9. "Rug" is also slang for overgrown pubic hair.

Which I bring up for no particular reason except to further expound upon the versatility of the word "rug".

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Response to Act_of_Reparation (Reply #9)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:56 PM

22. And then there is the word "Merkin,"

which is a sort of false rug for those regions of the body. They're pretty much out of favor, these days, I understand. In fact...well...I won't go there. This is the Religion Group after all.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #22)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 04:29 PM

23. In Ancient Egypt, the priests were completely bereft of body hair.

It would seem the gods of that region found rugs... unappealing, and so all holy men were expected to shave theirs off every other day.

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Response to Act_of_Reparation (Reply #23)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 04:30 PM

24. Well, it seems like a lot of millennials are "walking like Egyptians"

these days, if I'm understanding the trends.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #24)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 04:36 PM

25. Whatever floats your boat, I guess.

Me, I don't have the time or the patience to landscape this nordic taiga the good Lord saw fit to put everywhere except the top of my head. I happily embrace my rug.

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Response to Act_of_Reparation (Reply #25)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 06:55 PM

34. Please don't say boats...

That would be just our luck.

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Response to Lordquinton (Reply #34)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 09:57 PM

36. !!!

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Response to Lordquinton (Reply #34)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 10:01 PM

37. OMG...

...not that

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Response to MineralMan (Original post)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:26 PM

2. I had a rug once.

It really tied the room together.

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Response to Act_of_Reparation (Reply #2)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:27 PM

4. Dude!

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #4)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:30 PM

6. El Duderino, if you're not into the brevity thing.

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Response to Act_of_Reparation (Reply #6)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:32 PM

8. Our somewhat overweight Beagle/Basset dog is named Dude.

With good reason, too. He is the Dude! He once peed on the rug, too. We forgave him.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #8)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:37 PM

10. I have cats.

But I have no rugs. They occasionally piss on my carpet though, which is like a rug but with fewer edges.

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Response to Act_of_Reparation (Reply #10)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:39 PM

11. It seems that our pets have little respect for rugs in general

We also have cats, who routinely choose our nicest rug upon which to deposit their hair balls. Hmm...little criminals, they are.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #11)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:48 PM

15. I can only imagine what my little critters would do to a rug.

Every piece of furniture in the house is a potential scratch post. Whatever they're near when they happen to get happy tends to get shredded.

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Response to Act_of_Reparation (Reply #2)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 03:30 PM

7. Yeah, but don't you hate it when...

...some jerk comes along and...but I digress.

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Response to MineralMan (Original post)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 04:42 PM

26. What a fascinating rug discussion...

it seems more than just rugs can be learned from this essay though...a little about life as well perhaps?

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Response to nil desperandum (Reply #26)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 04:44 PM

27. Life is a ubiquitous classroom, it seems.

Everywhere you go, there's a lesson to be learned.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #27)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 04:57 PM

31. Indeed it is

everyone should experience the satisfaction of making something instead of just floating through on the creations of others...whether rugs or not the understanding of what goes into making things is never to be appreciated without experiencing it for oneself.

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Response to nil desperandum (Reply #31)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 09:01 PM

35. Sadly, most people don't get that.

Part of the problem is the difficulty of acquiring sufficient skills to make something of adequate quality. That's why making things needs to become a habit when a person is young. That way, skills are learned early. Then, as an adult skills can be refined to a higher level.

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Response to MineralMan (Original post)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 04:46 PM

28. When I was a Cub SCout leader, 35 years ago when my son was young...

we built simple weaving frames and made some "Navajo" rugs using twine and yarn scraps donated by parents. Wow, what an amazing variety of colors we had, and not one of them authentic!

It was surprisingly enjoyable.

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Response to Binkie The Clown (Reply #28)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 04:48 PM

29. Crafts are important. They help us learn more about

the things we use daily and what goes into creating them. I've always been encouraging about people trying new craft skills.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #29)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 04:57 PM

30. For sure.

When I was a kid and my mother got into ceramics, I had to try it too. But instead of using store-bought clay I insisted on going down to the creek and collecting my own natural clay. I "processed" it in a bucket with lots of water and made a nice smooth-textured clay.

The results were pretty amazing. The bowl I made fired without any trouble and produced a fine piece of unglazed earthenware that even had that ceramic "ring" to it when you tapped it. I've been interested in "primitive technology" ever since. I haven't knapped any flint or smelted any iron ore yet, but I've watched the videos on YouTube to see how it's done.

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Response to MineralMan (Original post)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 05:29 PM

32. If you tug on a thread in a rug it unravels.

So don’t tug your thread.

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Response to MineralMan (Original post)

Tue Mar 6, 2018, 06:23 PM

33. I got ten advertisements for rugs when I clicked on this post.

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Response to MineralMan (Original post)

Thu Mar 8, 2018, 07:09 AM

38. I think I would find the act of weaving the rug

more satisfying and therapeutic than using it for its named purpose.

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Response to aka-chmeee (Reply #38)

Thu Mar 8, 2018, 10:13 AM

39. There is a good repetitive rhythm in knotting the pile

for an oriental-style rug. As you tie each yarn on the weft, you first have to choose the right color, then perform a nifty maneuver with your fingers to loop the pre-cut length of yarn through the weft to form the knot. Since each row of knots contained over 250 individual knots on the larger rug I started, You soon fall into a rhythm that allows some contemplative thinking during the process. Each row represented 1/10 of an inch of the vertical pattern being woven. Then a thread is woven across the loom above the row of knots, which are then trimmed with scissors to match the pile height before continuing to the next row.

It is an exercise in patience, precision, and habitual, repetitive movements. Satisfaction is earned at the end of each row, I found.

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Response to MineralMan (Original post)

Fri Mar 9, 2018, 10:56 AM

40. Thanks for sharing. You're unfinished worrk of art reminds me of the work that Penelope left

unfinished while putting off suitors until her husband Odysseus could make it back home from his odyssey. The difference being that Penelope almost finished the rug each day and then took it apart again that night.

I grew up with antique rugs in the house, and they have always had a special place in my heart. When my wife and I traveled in Egypt 20 years ago, we visited the weaving town of Saqqara. While young girls did the finest detail, the old man who had taught all the weavers and managed the studio sat down at a loom and demonstrated his technique for us. We ended up buying a large silk rug that hangs on our wall to this day. On the other end of the weaving spectrum, I watched blanket weavers at looms only about six inches wide in villages in the Sahara desert in Mali. The warp was perhaps 30 feet long, and was tied to a large stone. As they wove the stone was pulled closer and closer through the sand. They would weave lengths of about six feet, leave about 6 inches without weft, and then start on another section. Eight to ten of these would be sewn together to make one blanket. I am always drawn to watch weavers at work wherever I happen to be in the world.

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Response to Nitram (Reply #40)

Fri Mar 9, 2018, 11:03 AM

41. You're welcome. The more we learn about things,

the better we understand them and appreciate them.

Here's a photo of the little rug I wove for that magazine article. I realized that I had no photo of it, so I snapped this yesterday evening:

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #41)

Fri Mar 9, 2018, 11:10 AM

42. Nice! Still attached to your hand-made loom this is indeed a work of art.

Can you tell me why the orange and black "frame" appears to be sewed on to the central square? What's going on around that interface? It looks like you've done the same thing around the outside.

Years ago, when my wife started weaving, I tried my hand at weaving a few pieces on a tabletop loom. The only part I don't enjoy is setting up the warp at the beginning.

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Response to Nitram (Reply #42)

Fri Mar 9, 2018, 11:12 AM

43. Thanks.

The orange section is just knotted pile, like the rest of the rug. It's surrounded by black pile. Same with the border. I alternated black and white knots to frame those. The irregularity that looks like stitching is just the irregularity of knot placement in the rows. Remember that this was my first attempt, with rather a coarse pile density. 10 knots per inch.

The warp on that primitive loom is cotton cord, simply wrapped on the horizontal frame. I cut notches in the frame sticks to keep the alignment. I copied a very old photo of a rug loom to manage alternating the warp cords. A wooden slat, which is no longer present, was woven through the warp to raise one set of cords when turned. The alternate set of warp cords were raised by a heddle board and string loops, which you can see at the top of the loom. A long flat shuttle of wood carried the weft threads.

It was a slow process, but weft weaving was the least time-consuming part of the work. There is a single weft course woven above each row of pile, beaten down with a coarse hair comb.

The larger loom I build for the second project used the same strategies, but was build of 2 X 4 lumber. I used the same methods for weaving the weft, though. Very primitive, but that was my goal.

I used the Turkish or Ghiordes knot for the pile. It was easier for my clumsy big fingers to tie than the Persian knot:

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Response to Nitram (Reply #42)

Fri Mar 9, 2018, 11:59 AM

44. Here's a photo of the larger rug project

Still on it's loom. If you look, you can see the paper cartoon for the rug behind the warp.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #44)

Fri Mar 9, 2018, 02:03 PM

45. I love the colors and the design. How about if you settled on a limited goal of just finishing

this first block and turning it into a smaller rug?

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Response to Nitram (Reply #45)

Fri Mar 9, 2018, 02:16 PM

46. I already cut it off the loom 15 years ago, after weaving a plain

end to match the other end. As I said in the OP, it's in use as an end table runner, and as the rug under our holiday tree each year. There was really no chance I'd ever finish it, and its unfinished state stimulates questions, so I don't mind.

I guess I learned what I set out to learn about rug-weaving. Life just got busy and other interests got in the way of time to spend knotting pile yarns.

The design included a central lozenge-shaped element, and was symmetrical. I liked the colors, too. The interwoven elements of the pattern interested me, as well. I didn't use any traditional symbolism in it, and decided to make it purely geometric in form.

While I wish I had finished it, there were many other projects that followed, each of which was designed to teach me something. Each pile row took about 1.5 hours to knot. I can't remember how many rows the rug would have taken, but when I did the math, clearly it was a bigger project than I imagined at the beginning.

Even creating the knot-by-knot cartoon took hours to finish. I have enormous respect for rug-weavers. I did have the cartoon attached to the loom for a while, but switched to counting knots for each color not long after I started. It was easier to follow that way. This was all pre-computer. Today, I'd create the pattern in a spreadsheet and print a numerical knot count. I do not know how the traditional rug-weavers managed the patterns, and never found a description of that process. A knot-count method for each row would probably have been the simplest method. But, I did see references to cartoons being used during my research.

One of my antique tribal rugs, though, appears to have been designed during the weaving by the rug-maker. It's not symmetrical and has some almost random elements in it. It's all fascinating.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #46)

Fri Mar 9, 2018, 02:40 PM

47. Links Between Turkish and Navajo Rugs

I Iived in or around both nations, and was struck by similarities. Somebody should write a book on it.

Likely Navajos are related to high Altaic peoples in Asia.

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Response to Bretton Garcia (Reply #47)

Fri Mar 9, 2018, 03:04 PM

48. Yes. I've compared them as well.

Geometric patterns are common to both, and are pretty much automatic, given the grid-like limitations of woven fabrics. Religious and other symbolism are also aspects of both. However, one thing about weaving a rug, whether flat or pile, is that the limitations that exist, due to the physical structure of the weaving, restrict choices to some degree.

Colors are another interesting thing to compare. Both the early Navajo rugs and rugs of Asian origin used natural dyes, which are somewhat limited in the available color choices. So, you see similarities there, as well.

Design elements like borders, fields, and floating elements on those fields are also sort of dictated by the medium.

So, I'm not sure there's a cultural connection as much as a commonality out of the limits the medium imposes.

Like you, I've lived both in Turkey and in Arizona, so have been exposed to both, as well.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #48)

Fri Mar 9, 2018, 03:44 PM

49. Yes the "medium is the message" somewhat

Though I think I've seen the corn symbol or the female akimbo, or other figures, in both. As well as standard geometry.

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Response to Bretton Garcia (Reply #49)

Fri Mar 9, 2018, 03:48 PM

50. Yup. Both common natural symbols.

I don't think there's an actual cultural connection, though. Just human nature and recognition. There are a lot of crude animal figures in Caucasian rug designs. Those, too, are similar to Native American design elements.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #50)

Sat Mar 10, 2018, 12:11 AM

51. Sometimes in-common symbols tell us things.

Pictures of corn tell us we have say, a partly agricultural culture, that centers partly around specifically, corn, or maize.

Often we can find similar things, gods, in "different" cultures. Which suggests a link between them.

The fact that we have rugs in two cultures, tells us a bit about their in-common technology, too.

Even the type of threads, knots, can tell us a lot.

If many American Indians are thought to have come from Asia, over the Bering Strait, then any in-common things between American Indians and Asians, could be significant. DNA links could confirm a relationship as well.

By the way? In a few recent posters to DU, I've noticed some interests in common to the new "Alternative Right" movement of Breitbart, and Steve Bannon. Typically, characteristically, the mostly anti-liberal, undemocratic "Alt Right" will borrow some liberal leftist ideas, to try to make their radically conservative Republican ideas, look palatable to Democrats. In DU, we occasionally see a few figures that try to weaken or seduce left-leaning atheist democrats. By noting that normally repressive, authoritarian, evangelical Republican churches, at times favor some liberal issues. Like equal rights.

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Response to MineralMan (Original post)

Sat Mar 10, 2018, 01:45 AM

52. My grandmother braided rugs.

When I was about 20, I asked her to teach me, so I know how to do it, too. I've made some small ones, and I've used the same technique to make chair pads. I'd like to make a large one for my living room. It takes a great deal of fabric to make a room-sized braided rug, so I'll have to find a source to buy it at a reasonable price. Wool fabric is expensive. She used to buy ends and remnants and seconds and such in volume directly from the woolen mills. Most of those mills have closed.

She also hooked rugs with narrow strips of fabric pulled through burlap. This was how she made hallway and stair runners. She didn't make them with any particular design or pattern, but worked them in rows of random colors. She taught me how to make rugs that way, too.

When my grandmother died, I claimed all of her rug-making tools. No one else wanted them.

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Response to Mariana (Reply #52)

Sat Mar 10, 2018, 10:49 AM

53. Check the discount bins at thrift stores for wool items.

Garage sales are also a good bet.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #53)

Sat Mar 10, 2018, 09:53 PM

55. Thank you MineralMan.

I have obtained enough odds and ends that way to make my small projects, but it would take forever to gather enough for a large rug.

I see there are a few woolen mills still open, and some are within reasonable driving distance. I'll contact them and see if they can do anything for me. Some people use other, less expensive fabrics, but if I'm going to put that much work into a project, I'd like it to last a long time. Wool wears better than just about anything else, it looks better, and it feels wonderful under bare feet.

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Response to Mariana (Reply #52)

Sat Mar 10, 2018, 12:17 PM

54. Here's another possible source of wool fabric scraps

https://www.etsy.com/search?q=wool%20fabric%20scraps

Etsy has all sorts of interesting stuff.

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Response to MineralMan (Original post)

Sat Mar 10, 2018, 10:19 PM

56. I think we will probably have this discussion

every couple of months. It has been fascinating, I’ve learned a lot about rugs.

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