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Sun Feb 10, 2019, 12:55 PM

What Fiction are you reading this week, February 10, 2019?



I have The Flood, Ian Rankin's first novel from 1986. It's not a mystery like his Inspector Rebus books but it does have some rather mysterious things going on. And it exhibits his wonderful gift for writing. "The Flood is both a coming-of-age novel and an amazing portrait of a time and place. Dark, atmospheric and powerful, it is a remarkable debut from a remarkable author."

My copy is a reissue from 2012. Evidently the ones from the first printing are now worth a whole lot of money. You might want to check your bookshelves. This later copy has an Introduction written by Ian where he talks about his past and his writing. It's quite a nice addition.

In looking for the original publishing date I came across some fascinating information about Mr. Rankin. For instance, he's in a rock band called Best Picture. They have a couple of videos on YouTube. Also, there was a British TV show called Rebus that ran for four seasons. I will be looking to find that. Plus, I discovered an amazing tale about some mysterious paper sculptures that involves him. Too long to put here so I made a separate post about it.

Listening to Before the Fall by Noah Hawley. A private jet plunges into the ocean with eleven people on board and only two survive. Was it merely some dumb chance that so many influential people perished? Or was something far more sinister at work? Events soon threaten to spiral out of control in an escalating storm of media outrage and accusations. Quite suspenseful.

Thanks for the hearts. I think they must be from people here since you are the only ones who know I exist. I wish I could buy hearts back for all you good folks who post here but alas, I am not able to. So, instead, here. From me to you.

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Reply What Fiction are you reading this week, February 10, 2019? (Original post)
hermetic Feb 10 OP
dameatball Feb 10 #1
hermetic Feb 10 #3
dameatball Feb 10 #9
dameatball Feb 10 #40
MontanaMama Feb 10 #2
hermetic Feb 10 #4
Hestia Wednesday #97
MontanaMama Wednesday #98
Soxfan58 Feb 10 #5
PoindexterOglethorpe Feb 10 #6
hermetic Feb 10 #11
PoindexterOglethorpe Feb 10 #17
Polly Hennessey Feb 10 #7
hermetic Feb 10 #12
Princess Turandot Feb 10 #8
hermetic Feb 10 #13
shenmue Feb 10 #10
hermetic Feb 10 #14
shenmue Feb 10 #18
rzemanfl Feb 11 #52
Ohiogal Feb 10 #15
hermetic Feb 10 #16
TexasProgresive Feb 10 #19
hermetic Feb 10 #20
SeattleVet Feb 10 #21
hermetic Feb 10 #23
MLAA Feb 10 #27
SeattleVet Feb 10 #36
Ohiya Feb 11 #45
dameatball Feb 10 #41
jls4561 Feb 11 #58
Wawannabe Tuesday #68
murielm99 Feb 10 #22
hermetic Feb 10 #24
Number9Dream Feb 10 #25
hermetic Feb 10 #26
northoftheborder Feb 10 #31
MLAA Feb 10 #28
hermetic Feb 10 #34
MLAA Feb 10 #44
yellowdogintexas Tuesday #65
MLAA Tuesday #74
Srkdqltr Feb 10 #29
hermetic Feb 10 #35
Srkdqltr Feb 10 #37
hermetic Feb 10 #38
Squinch Feb 10 #30
hermetic Feb 10 #32
Squinch Feb 10 #33
pscot Feb 10 #39
hermetic Feb 11 #47
dhol82 Feb 10 #42
hermetic Feb 11 #48
dhol82 Feb 11 #50
Cuthbert Allgood Feb 10 #43
hermetic Feb 11 #49
Cuthbert Allgood Wednesday #100
The King of Prussia Feb 11 #46
hermetic Feb 11 #53
Ohiya Tuesday #71
Thomas Hurt Feb 11 #51
hermetic Feb 11 #56
The Blue Flower Feb 11 #54
jls4561 Feb 11 #59
hermetic Feb 11 #60
marigold20 Feb 11 #61
Ohiya Tuesday #72
saidsimplesimon Feb 11 #55
hermetic Feb 11 #63
BHDem53 Feb 11 #57
alfredo Feb 11 #62
sfwriter Feb 11 #64
Ohiya Tuesday #70
yellowdogintexas Tuesday #66
radical noodle Tuesday #67
hermetic Tuesday #77
radical noodle Tuesday #94
Wawannabe Tuesday #69
hermetic Tuesday #81
Puppyjive Tuesday #73
snpsmom Tuesday #78
TeapotInATempest Tuesday #75
hermetic Tuesday #80
Squinch Tuesday #84
TeapotInATempest Tuesday #86
radical noodle Tuesday #95
snpsmom Tuesday #76
hermetic Tuesday #79
snpsmom Tuesday #85
matt819 Tuesday #82
hermetic Tuesday #83
TeapotInATempest Tuesday #89
TeapotInATempest Tuesday #88
dlk Tuesday #87
TeapotInATempest Tuesday #90
BarbD Tuesday #91
Beowulf42 Tuesday #92
hermetic Wednesday #106
Cuthbert Allgood Wednesday #107
hostalover Tuesday #93
hermetic Wednesday #102
happybird Wednesday #96
hermetic Wednesday #103
Cuthbert Allgood Wednesday #108
happybird Wednesday #109
Chalco Wednesday #99
hermetic Wednesday #104
northoftheborder Wednesday #101
hermetic Wednesday #105
MuseRider Wednesday #110

Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 12:59 PM

1. "Cemetary Dance"by Preston & Child. Another in the Agent Pendergast series.

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Response to dameatball (Reply #1)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 01:08 PM

3. Lots of 5 Star reviews

Pendergast-the world's most enigmatic FBI Special Agent-returns to New York City to investigate a murderous cult.

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Response to hermetic (Reply #3)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 01:22 PM

9. I think it is one of the more fun reads so far in the series, although they are all good.

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Response to dameatball (Reply #1)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 06:41 PM

40. A good reason to read the Pendergast series in chronological order is that a fairly important

character from previous stories dies off in this book. Not saying who.....

Even though this is a so-called "stand alone" story, the fates of the characters is not. Still a very entertaining read.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 01:04 PM

2. The Shadow Of Night

The second book in the All Soul’s Trilogy by Deborah Harkness. It’s total fantasy about witches, vampires and demons and their battles amongst each other. Witches fear vampires and vampires hate witches...demons are troublemakers for all concerned. I’m not usually drawn to fantasy but I feel the need to escape our current reality and these are fun reads.

Hiya hermetic! How is winter treating you? We are in a mess on blowing snow and very cold temps here in western MT.

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Response to MontanaMama (Reply #2)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 01:12 PM

4. Hey you!

Delighted to see you. We seem to finally be getting our winter here. It's been in the 40s for a good while but now 20s and it even snowed about an inch last night. I know you guys are getting your usual. Think of you often.

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Response to MontanaMama (Reply #2)

Wed Feb 13, 2019, 09:33 AM

97. If you like the Deborah Harness series, read "Witches of New York" by Ami McKay

It is not a paranormal book, per se, but more a history of New York in the early-1880's It is not a reimagined history, either, as so many books are these days, but actual bit and pieces of history of the NYC area. A tea room (Fifth Avenue Hotel) is one of the few places that women can go to eat and meet other women, which is where the witches meet their clientele.

Interesting was the delivery of "Cleopatra's Needle" at the same time one of the major characters is moving to NYC from Stony Point.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cleopatra%27s_Needle_(New_York_City)

It's mate is in London, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cleopatra%27s_Needle,_London

Very well written and engaging characters. I like the quotes from the aunt who follows the suffragette writers of the time -

"Fortune favors the prepared mind."

"Beauty seeks attention. Intelligence commands it."

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Response to Hestia (Reply #97)

Wed Feb 13, 2019, 10:14 AM

98. Thank you!

I put Witches of NY on my want list.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 01:14 PM

5. trump's state of the union

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 01:16 PM

6. DRY by Neal Shusterman and Jarrod Shusterman.

One morning there is no water coming out of the taps at all. Needless to say, things quickly get dicey. It's YA, as I think all of Shusterman's books are.

Before the Fall is very good.

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Response to PoindexterOglethorpe (Reply #6)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 01:31 PM

11. Seems like a story EVERYONE needs to read

I am glad to see it written for YAs, since they will be the ones dealing with this reality.

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Response to hermetic (Reply #11)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 02:02 PM

17. There is a lot of excellent YA out there.

Shusterman has written a bunch and I've liked every one of his books that I've read.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 01:19 PM

7. The Marriage Lie

by Kimberly Belle. Great mystery for a cloudy, gray day. A heart for you. I look forward to you and all the other “lovers of books”. I have had many great suggestions from all of you.

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Response to Polly Hennessey (Reply #7)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 01:32 PM

12. Aww, thanks

We do get some good recs here, that's for sure. Yours there sounds like another...

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 01:21 PM

8. Sleeping in the Ground by Peter Robinson..

#24 in his Inspector Banks series.

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Response to Princess Turandot (Reply #8)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 01:37 PM

13. Sounds like another

winner from Mr. Robinson.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 01:24 PM

10. Surrender, New York by Caleb Carr

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Response to shenmue (Reply #10)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 01:45 PM

14. From the author of The Alienist

another roller coaster ride of ideas and emotions. Surrender, New York brings to life the grim underbelly of a prosperous nation - and those most vulnerable to its failings.

Sounds intense.

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Response to hermetic (Reply #14)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 02:09 PM

18. It is!

It's a little slow to start, but maybe that's because I'm on cold medicine.

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Response to shenmue (Reply #10)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 04:42 PM

52. Carr's "The Alienist" is what I am reading this week. n/t

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 01:48 PM

15. The Shell Game by Sara Paretsky

I have read every one of her V.I. Warshawski books. I am enjoying this one, too, so far.

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Response to Ohiogal (Reply #15)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 01:51 PM

16. Right on

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 02:12 PM

19. I finished Michael Connelly's "Nine Dragons"

It was a great read featuring Harry Bosch. I have been a fan of the Bosch series, but I have read them out of order as I get them. This one really explains a lot about why Harry is like he is. Not really spoilers but Connelly named dropped Matthew McConaughey who played Lincoln Lawyer, Mickey Haller, Bosch's half brother. Mickey has a few actual lines in the book. Anyway I really enjoyed it although some parts were really sad.

So I am back to Wheel of Time reading The Dragon Reborn. Hmmm nine dragons and one reborn. The nine dragons are 8 mountains near Hong Kong plus one dragon, the emperor. The dragon reborn is a man not a beast. If my reading of this Robert Jordn book is like the last it will take a couple of weeks.

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Response to TexasProgresive (Reply #19)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 02:32 PM

20. Nine Dragon walls in China

Impressive. Such walls are typically found in imperial Chinese palaces and gardens.


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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 03:36 PM

21. "The stupidest angel: a heartwarming tale of Christmas terror" by Christopher Moore

Just finished one of his other novels, 'Fluke'. Absurdist fiction, with a good deal of very good humor. Decided I liked his style, so I put a few of his other books onto my tablet for the Kindle app.

First sentence: "Christmas crept into Pine Cove like a creeping Christmas thing: dragging garland, ribbon, and sleigh bells, oozing eggnog, reeking of pine, and threatening festive doom like a cold sore under the mistletoe."

OK, I was hooked!

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Response to SeattleVet (Reply #21)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 04:13 PM

23. Oh yeah

That's a great one.

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Response to SeattleVet (Reply #21)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 04:33 PM

27. Sounds good!

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Response to MLAA (Reply #27)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 05:44 PM

36. His style reminds me a lot of Carl Hiassen...

same rapid-fire narrative, and throw-away humor lines.

If you like Hiassen, I'm guessing you'll like Moore.

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Response to SeattleVet (Reply #36)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 07:43 AM

45. A blurb from the Onion calls Moore...

"The thinking man's Dave Barry or the impatient man's Tom Robbins."

I'm reading, Sacre Bleu by Moore, it is so so, not nearly as funny as Noir, but it is interesting and it takes place in Paris, so there's that.

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Response to SeattleVet (Reply #21)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 06:49 PM

41. I wil check that one out. So far my favorite Moore novels are "Lamb" and "Noir.'

always room for Mo(o)re....)

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Response to SeattleVet (Reply #21)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 05:26 PM

58. My favorites are "Fool" and "Lamb"

I am waiting for "Noir" in paperback. I love Moore!

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Response to SeattleVet (Reply #21)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 05:03 AM

68. I absolutely LOVED this book!!!

Roared with laughter. Wacky as hell!
It was an audio and so fun having it read to me. I would like to read it/hear it again. Thanks for the reminder.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 04:11 PM

22. Non-fiction for me this week.

"Escaping the Delta," by Elijah Wald.

This is a white guy trying to rewrite the history of the blues. He is into "myth-busting."

Robert Johnson was not the father of the blues. Early bluesmen (and women) played more than just the blues.

Skip this book, especially if you love the blues.

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Response to murielm99 (Reply #22)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 04:14 PM

24. Okay

Thanks.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 04:17 PM

25. "The First Conspiracy" by Brad Meltzer & Josh Mensch

Though this is non-fiction, this is the thread I always post in. It is about a secret plot to assassinate / kidnap George Washington and how it was foiled. I enjoyed it except that it was written in present tense which was slightly annoying.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/39863169-the-first-conspiracy

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Response to Number9Dream (Reply #25)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 04:26 PM

26. I remember

back when I was a teenager, reading a story about a plot to poison Washington. It was written like a diary by the perp. He had this nightshade plant's fruit he was going to add to some food. Turned out to be a tomato. I've always wondered if that was true. Probably not.

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Response to Number9Dream (Reply #25)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 04:53 PM

31. "Dreams of Glory" is a book about a plot to kill Washington, also.

I don't know for sure if there was a historical plot attempted, but this one is definitely at least partial fiction.

I've listened to a couple of Baldacci books recently: The Innocent, and Total Control. I liked The Innocent better. Baldacci's novels are so good to listen to while doing repetitive boring tasks. Has anyone read "Memory Man" who sustains a brain injury which results in his not being able to forget anything?

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 04:40 PM

28. A Death in China by Carl Hiassen and Bill Montelbano

I am a big Carl Hiassen Fan andthought I had read them all. I love his humor, and having spent my childhood in Florida they were kind of reminiscent for me. I just came across a book this one where Mr Hiassen collaborated with Mr Montelbano. So I got it.

Wow, it is nothing, of Mr. Hiassen’s famous style. Yet it is very good. I also like to read detective/police/crime books especially in other locations than the US (Nordics/Venice/ Barcelona/ Rome/Shanghai). This is, so far a straight up mystery taking place in Beijing and Xian and I am really enjoying it. I lived in Shanghai for a few years and travelled to both Beijing and Xian. But again, there isn’t a trace of Hiassen in it!

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Response to MLAA (Reply #28)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 05:24 PM

34. Interesting

I love Hiassen's humor, too.

Living in Shanghai must have been interesting, as well.

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Response to hermetic (Reply #34)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 09:29 PM

44. It was a wonderful opportunity to live there for 4 years for work.

My husband enjoyed it also. At the end the pollution got really bad, we all joked that while it was an amazing experience it probably cost us a couple of years off our life 😉

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Response to MLAA (Reply #28)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 01:17 AM

65. There are three or four of these collaborations, I think I read Death in China

and one other one

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Response to yellowdogintexas (Reply #65)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 01:37 PM

74. Cool, I will look for them, thanks for mentioning.

I just finished Death in China and really enjoyed it. Total mystery vs numerous exploits f his current style, but very good story line and well written.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 04:44 PM

29. Rereading Just One Thing After Another. Jodi Taylor

Just finished J.D. Robb Connections In Death. Next will be Lee Child Past Tense.

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Response to Srkdqltr (Reply #29)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 05:26 PM

35. Snowed in?

From your avatar, just thought you might be.

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Response to hermetic (Reply #35)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 05:45 PM

37. So far just a dusting of snow.

I'm in the far South East. Between Detroit and Toledo. Hopefully snow will be moderate. If there is a snow day I get the granddaughter tomorrow.

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Response to Srkdqltr (Reply #37)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 06:05 PM

38. Ahh,

that's a great way to spend a day. Believe me, they grow up way too fast.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 04:45 PM

30. Answered Prayers by Truman Capote. His unfinished last book. It is so sad to

see his talent peeping through this nasty, tawdry, vengeful, gossip-column choice of subject matter. What a waste.

I don't think I can finish it.

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Response to Squinch (Reply #30)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 04:56 PM

32. Aww

That is sad. I read it's supposed to be "witty." Maybe not so much?

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Response to hermetic (Reply #32)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 05:01 PM

33. He IS an enormous wit and an enormous talent. I have loved his other work.

The wit is in there, but it is just as mean as could be.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 06:27 PM

39. The World as I Found It by Bruce Duffy

I started this about 10 years ago and got half-way through. This time I mean business. A fictional bio of Ludwig Wittgenstein might seem like a reach, but philosophers have their troubles, like other men and thereby hangs the tale. Duffy assembles a great cast of characters: Bertrand Russell, G.E.Moore, the roving Lady Ottoline Morrell, the Bloomsbury group, Sigmund Freud. I used to be an admirer of Bertrand Russell, not as a philosopher but as a public man. This book takes some of the gloss off Russell the man. I've read a lot in the past 10 years so I come to this with new eyes, so to speak. It's a great novel. We are in fact snowed in.

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Response to pscot (Reply #39)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 04:14 PM

47. Well hell

Sorry to hear that. Hope you have plenty of what you need to get you through. Sounds like you have some serious reading to keep your mind occupied for a while, at least. Looking at my old stomping grounds that are just buried under snow right now makes me grateful I moved when I did to a place where snow is not so much of a nuisance. Stay safe and warm.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 06:51 PM

42. Just finished Warlight by Michael Ordaatje

I was not enchanted. Very convoluted plot.
It had some interesting bits.
It got rave reviews. Not sure why.

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Response to dhol82 (Reply #42)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 04:24 PM

48. Maybe because this...

"Michael Ondaatje is not capable of writing anything other than a five-star novel." So begins a GoodReads review. A good many people agree, but there are plenty who don't.

The premise sounds interesting but I know I had some issues with The English Patient that make me pretty sure I won't give him any more of my time. Just personal preferences, I guess.

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Response to hermetic (Reply #48)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 04:39 PM

50. Yup, no way am I going to give The English Patient a try

I’m sure it will have some interesting bits but meander slowly, slowly around the yard.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2019, 07:11 PM

43. Carry On by Rainbow Rowell

I had zero expectations going in. It was a recommendation by a fellow English teacher and a student. They both know I like Rowell's young adult literature and I hadn't read it yet. I had no idea what it was about. Pleasantly surprised. It's very derivative of Harry Potter, but she is putting a very cool spin on the chosen one trope.

I'll likely finish it early this week and update with the next on the list.

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Response to Cuthbert Allgood (Reply #43)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 04:35 PM

49. Don't you just love

being pleasantly surprised by a book?

Simon Snow is the worst Chosen One who's ever been chosen. Half the time, Simon can't even make his wand work, and the other half, he starts something on fire.

This sounds wonderful and the reviews are just raving about it. I will for sure have to read this.

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Response to Cuthbert Allgood (Reply #43)

Wed Feb 13, 2019, 10:42 AM

100. Moved on to American Pastoral by Roth

Trying to work my way through the Pulitzer Fiction books. Really liking this, but Roth is a god, so...

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 11:56 AM

46. Not been reading this week

so still on "Two-thirds of a ghost". It's very good.
Last week we went to see Steve Forbert play, so next up is "Big City Cat: My Life in Folk-Rock". Non-fiction for a change.

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Response to The King of Prussia (Reply #46)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 04:57 PM

53. Romeo's Tune!

Been a long time since I last heard Forbert. I've always been a big fan of folk music and this recently published book sounds good.

"This insightful and humorous memoir is not simply the tale of a talented survivor, but also a glimpse into a musician's life and the challenges faced—as well as the lessons learned—in a changing industry during the last forty years."

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Response to hermetic (Reply #53)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 08:54 AM

71. Forbert is easy to like,

He's played here a couple of times in the last few years at a small venue. I'm going to place his book on reserve shortly.

I really appreciate the effort you put into these posts. It's like a gold mine!

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 04:41 PM

51. The Driver by Hart Hanson

a thriller. Hason is the creator of the Bones tv series.

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Response to Thomas Hurt (Reply #51)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 05:12 PM

56. Oh neat

Sounds worth looking into. Thanks.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 04:59 PM

54. A Gentleman in Moscow

So far a very entertaining read about life in Soviet Russia from the beginning of the revolution in 1920.

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Response to The Blue Flower (Reply #54)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 05:27 PM

59. Highly recommend this book

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Response to The Blue Flower (Reply #54)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 05:39 PM

60. Many of us

who post here have read that and really liked/loved it. It is special and memorable.

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Response to The Blue Flower (Reply #54)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 05:48 PM

61. One of my favorites!

I've recommended this book to all my relatives. It's just wonderful.

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Response to The Blue Flower (Reply #54)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 09:11 AM

72. This book was a big hit at our book club meeting!

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 05:01 PM

55. Ian Rankin is on my reading list.

This great literary master never envisioned the dark ages of rumpublicans, or did he?

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Response to saidsimplesimon (Reply #55)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 06:41 PM

63. We don't know

But, we could have asked him! Yesterday!! He was in New York City on a book tour but I only just found this out because I also just found out he's on Twitter so I started following him. https://twitter.com/Beathhigh

Dang.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 05:24 PM

57. The Art of the Deal.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 06:12 PM

62. "The Ministry of Utmost Happiness" by Arundhati Roy

I love her writing

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Mon Feb 11, 2019, 09:02 PM

64. Hugo Winners...

I will finish reading the Hugo Winning novels in 5 books. I finish Simak's Way Station tonight. Great stuff ahead, I hope, including Arthur C Clarke's Fountains of Paradise and Rendezvous with Rama, Robert Sawyer's Hominids, Blish's A Case of Conscience, and Zelazny's Lord of Light. I may reread Farmer's To Your Scattered Bodies Go, David Brin's Startide Rising, and Fred Pohl's Gateway. I haven't read those since Reagan was President.

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Response to sfwriter (Reply #64)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 08:43 AM

70. Sounds like fun!

I read nothing but SF for about a decade sometime last century! Lord of Light was my favorite book for quite a while. I wrote a paper on Lord of Light when I took a course in college called Introduction to Science Fiction. That was an easy "A".

Enjoy!

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 01:19 AM

66. I just finished "Tourist Season" by Carl Hiaasen

It was a re-read but it's been so long since I read it the first time that I had forgotten most of it

I am also reading "Dreamland" an interesting non fiction about all aspects of the opiate crisis.
Well written

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 02:09 AM

67. All the Ugly and Beautiful Things

by Bryn Greenwood. I'm just now beginning to worry about where it's going.

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Response to radical noodle (Reply #67)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 02:56 PM

77. I can imagine

A powerful novel you won’t soon forget, Bryn Greenwood's All the Ugly and Wonderful Things challenges all we know and believe about love.


Growing up in the Midwest among meth dealers and all that implies. Heavy.

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Response to hermetic (Reply #77)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 09:00 PM

94. It is very well written

I've just been dragged headlong into the narrative. No matter where it's going, I have to finish it.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 05:16 AM

69. Inheritance

By Christopher Paolini
It is audio and unabridged version.
My son and I read the Erogon series together as they came out, so I know the story, but there does seem to be new info in this version. Even more details if you can imagine.

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Response to Wawannabe (Reply #69)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 03:06 PM

81. Dragon riders

This is the much-anticipated, astonishing conclusion to the worldwide bestselling Inheritance cycle.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 09:18 AM

73. My Antonia

Pretty good read. Hoping to shed some light on Nebraska. My father grew up in Nebraska and had one of the most strongest work ethic I have ever seen. He passed a little over a year ago. I miss him so much.

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Response to Puppyjive (Reply #73)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 02:58 PM

78. Read this in grad school

and enjoyed it. Led me to other Cather.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 02:43 PM

75. When Christ and His Saints Slept: A Novel (Plantagenets Book 1)

by Sharon Kay Penman.

Very enjoyable if you like well-researched medieval historical fiction.

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Response to TeapotInATempest (Reply #75)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 03:03 PM

80. Sounds good

A.D. 1135. As church bells tolled for the death of England's King Henry I, his barons faced the unwelcome prospect of being ruled by a woman: Henry's beautiful daughter Maude, Countess of Anjou. But before Maude could claim her throne, her cousin Stephen seized it. In their long and bitter struggle, all of England bled and burned.

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Response to TeapotInATempest (Reply #75)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 03:48 PM

84. Well, shoot! I thought I had read all of hers! This goes on my list. Thanks.

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Response to Squinch (Reply #84)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 03:52 PM

86. Happy to help! :)

I always love finding out I have more to read from an author I like.

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Response to TeapotInATempest (Reply #75)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 10:06 PM

95. I just ordered this to read next

Thanks!

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 02:51 PM

76. We Cast a Shadow

by Maurice Carlos Ruffin. Good stuff!

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Response to snpsmom (Reply #76)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 03:00 PM

79. Just released

This electrifying, hallucinatory novel is at once a keen satire of surviving racism in America and a profoundly moving family story. At its center is a father at war with himself who just wants his son to thrive in a broken world. A writer whose work evokes the crackling prose of Ralph Ellison and the dizzying menace of Franz Kafka, Maurice Carlos Ruffin is a ferociously talented new writer who fearlessly shines a light on the violence we inherit, and on the desperate things we do for the ones we love.

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Response to hermetic (Reply #79)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 03:49 PM

85. Yes!

He’s a alumnus of my grad program and I am lucky to be in a writing group with him.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 03:22 PM

82. A few, as usual

I can't remember (and am too lazy to check) whether these were on last week's book post.

I'm about half way through the audiobook of Pillars of the Earth. I know this sounds crazy, but if I could time travel, I'd love to go back to the Medieval period. Well, at least for a short time.

Finished Robin Cook's Pandemic. Meh! Annoying characters.

Reading Gregory Benford's Rewrite. Benford is a physicist, and the novel is a take on the concept of the multiverse. Very entertaining. It would be thought provoking if there were at least some evidence of multiverses. At the very least, Benford has tossed the idea of Star Trek's prime directive and the central stricture on time travel. Don't fuck (too much) with changing history. Only about 100 pages in. Enjoying it.

Victoria Helen Stone's Jane Doe. Narrator is a sociopath on a mission to rain down wrath on a man who caused the sociopath's best friend to commit suicide. And, yes, she does address the issue of a sociopath having friends. A bit grim, but having fun so far.

I have about 300 books on my mp3 player (yes, you read that right - mp3 player - from the days before devices enforced digital rights management). Sadly, I am unlikely to live long enough to listen to all of them. No, I'm not ill or dying. It's just a lot of books, and I only listen on my errands and short commutes to/from work. So many books, so little time.

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Response to matt819 (Reply #82)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 03:31 PM

83. The book lover's curse

Hopefully there will be an afterlife where all literature is available for us to peruse throughout eternity. Once can hope, right?

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Response to hermetic (Reply #83)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 03:58 PM

89. Oh how I hope so.

I must have been about 30 years old at the time when, standing in a bookstore full of books I wanted to read, it occurred to me that people were just going to keep writing books and that I'd die long before I could read everything I wanted to. It was quite the revelation to me.

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Response to matt819 (Reply #82)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 03:55 PM

88. I'd like to travel to that time period, too

although not in a plague year, naturally.

Pillars of the Earth was fun to read, don't you think?

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 03:55 PM

87. I'm Enjoying Louise Penny's, "Kingdom of the Blind"

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Response to dlk (Reply #87)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 04:22 PM

90. I didn't know she had another book out

Thanks!

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 05:10 PM

91. Elmer Gantry by Sinclair Lewis

I was moved by a quote from Lewis: "When fascism comes to America it will be wrapped in a flag and carrying a cross."

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 05:17 PM

92. Reading List

At present I am rereading "Tess of the d'Urbervilles". Since last summer I have been on a trek to read more novels about women. Started with "Madam Bovary", went to "Rebecca", then to "Jane Eyre", so the logical next choice was to read "Tess". Hadn't visited her since college in the early 60s.

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Response to Beowulf42 (Reply #92)

Wed Feb 13, 2019, 12:10 PM

106. A great many novels

about women get mentioned in these weekly posts. You might want to check out Mary Russell novels by Laurie R. King which are quite enjoyable.

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Response to Beowulf42 (Reply #92)

Wed Feb 13, 2019, 12:26 PM

107. Love Tess

The dark Victorians just suck me in.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Tue Feb 12, 2019, 06:16 PM

93. The Reckoning by John Grisham. Did not like it. Waaaaay too long! Actually I skimmed

large portions dealing with WWII and the horrors of the Philippines, Bataan Death March, etc. I've read it before and don't care to again. The last portion is the legalese for which Grisham is famous and it was bor-r-r-ing! The ending of the book was horribly unsatisfying! There! Have I convinced anyone about this book?

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Response to hostalover (Reply #93)

Wed Feb 13, 2019, 11:53 AM

102. Duly noted

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Wed Feb 13, 2019, 12:38 AM

96. Just finished the Waste Lands by Stephen King earlier today

I've read the DT series before, but (and this is kinda weird), around a month ago I had a dream about Blaine the Mono. I have no clue why that crawled out of my subconscious after a decade. It was a weird ass dream, lol! I couldn't stop thinking about it. A few days ago I decided to reread the book, in hopes that would kill it off.

I thoroughly enjoyed revisiting that story/world and am now trying to decide if I should go on to Wizard and Glass or go back to very beginning and do the whole series again.

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Response to happybird (Reply #96)

Wed Feb 13, 2019, 11:56 AM

103. Once in a great while

a fictional character will visit my dreams. I enjoy it.

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Response to happybird (Reply #96)

Wed Feb 13, 2019, 12:27 PM

108. Now I want to dream about Blaine.

Waste Lands is such a good novel.

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Response to Cuthbert Allgood (Reply #108)

Wed Feb 13, 2019, 12:36 PM

109. Ha!

I've seen your name around the boards and took it as another sign, the final straw that made me dig out the book.
I don't recommend Blaine dreams. I was thinking about him so much I was starting to feel a little like Jake.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Wed Feb 13, 2019, 10:39 AM

99. The Incendiaries

Excellent!

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Response to Chalco (Reply #99)

Wed Feb 13, 2019, 11:59 AM

104. Explosive

A powerful, darkly glittering novel about violence, love, faith, and loss, as a young Korean American woman at an elite American university is drawn into acts of domestic terrorism by a cult tied to North Korea.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Wed Feb 13, 2019, 11:18 AM

101. Today started listening to "Pillars of the Earth", Ken Follett

Have had it on my list for a while. It's long.

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Response to northoftheborder (Reply #101)

Wed Feb 13, 2019, 12:03 PM

105. It is

Should keep you wrapped up for a good while. See you in the spring. JK

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Wed Feb 13, 2019, 01:13 PM

110. I do not tweet but sometimes I peek in at

those I follow. One of those is Stephen King. I saw him recommend a trilogy by Don Winslow. He said he was a great storyteller. These are not the kinds of books I read or stories I listen to but he peeked my interest so I dove in. He is such a great storyteller himself I figured why not?

It is a trilogy of fiction that starts with The Power of the Dog. It is about cartels and the US and the drug trade along the border. He is quite obviously not a Trumper and the story is fabulous, at least for me who does not read this kind of thing. I think some here might like it.

As a story it is horrific at times, well mostly awful but he creates the story and characters and it weaves together and I had trouble stopping the first book when I just had to think of other things. The Cartel is the second book and it is also good but I am kinda tired of the torture and back and forth. I will pick it back up some day because SK was right, he is a master storyteller. It seems very real and Mr. Winslow has some background that would allow him to write about this realistically. He also researched it well.

Anyway, I had to stop. It is heavy for me so I am taking the advice of others up thread and have started the trilogy Pine Cove by Christopher Moore. I could not resist after reading what others have written above, it seems like the antidote to War Lord lit. On to Practical Demonkeeping. Just downloaded and will listen to as I drive this afternoon to another town and back. YAY for books and drives! Thanks for all the good recs here, I always forget to add and share.

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