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Mon Jan 13, 2020, 06:41 AM

Those in their 70's--what are some changes you've experienced

Mentally and emotionally since your sixties?

Iím asking because Iím approaching my 70ís.

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Reply Those in their 70's--what are some changes you've experienced (Original post)
raccoon Jan 13 OP
whathehell Jan 13 #1
SCantiGOP Jan 13 #13
whathehell Jan 13 #15
Joinfortmill Jan 13 #2
Croney Jan 13 #3
3Hotdogs Jan 13 #4
3Hotdogs Jan 13 #7
Canoe52 Jan 13 #14
sinkingfeeling Jan 13 #5
greymattermom Jan 13 #6
PoindexterOglethorpe Saturday #17
cyclonefence Jan 13 #8
PoindexterOglethorpe Saturday #18
Freedomofspeech Jan 13 #9
Polly Hennessey Jan 13 #10
lillypaddle Jan 13 #11
marble falls Jan 13 #12
PoindexterOglethorpe Saturday #16

Response to raccoon (Original post)

Mon Jan 13, 2020, 07:02 AM

1. I just turned 70 a month ago..

and I'm still dealing with the "aftershock" of it..There's something that seems so undeniably "old" about that number... Other than that, it's too soon to tell.

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Response to whathehell (Reply #1)

Mon Jan 13, 2020, 11:50 AM

13. Two more years before I hit the big 7-0

but the only birthday that ever caused me to pause and reflect,.............was when my oldest child turned 40.

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Response to SCantiGOP (Reply #13)

Mon Jan 13, 2020, 11:50 PM

15. Yup.

I'm childless, but have two nieces over 50, so I know the feeling.

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Response to raccoon (Original post)

Mon Jan 13, 2020, 07:05 AM

2. By the time your 70

If you're lucky, you like and accept yourself for who you are, forgive yourself for past transgressions, and enjoy every new day. I've spent the last 5 years completing a bucket list of things I've wanted to do or experience. It's been a fun and rewarding experience. I highly recommend it. Enjoy!

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Response to raccoon (Original post)

Mon Jan 13, 2020, 07:06 AM

3. It's like describing the changes you experienced since your 50's.

Pretty hard to pinpoint, unless you've had major health events or relationship changes. Watching grandkids grow up does remind one of the circle of life. With me, it's made me consider the world as a whole, and not just my little corner of it.

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Response to raccoon (Original post)

Mon Jan 13, 2020, 07:19 AM

4. It would certainly depend on the circumstances under which you reach your 70's, 80's or whichever.

I am 77, health is between an 8 or 9. I have a heart problem and high blood pressure that don't affect my live but are always in the back of my mind. I have photography as a hobby and hiking club, 4 hikes a week. Being in the woods, next to a flowing stream is a great pleasure.

On the down side is depression. Since Joyce died, I no longer want to go on trips or whatever. There is little joy in my life.

Then there is the problem of my housemate's health. We have lived together since 1984. All of her major organs are in distress, requiring trips to medical care, and physical therapy 6 days a week. No matter how healthy I am, I still get a twinge when friends decline or experience a health problem.

Grand kids: They are a joy but they also grow up and grow away. The oldest goes to college in Sept. We spent much time together, bird watching and photography. When he reached puberty, he wanted to spend time with his friends... understandable, but it was a sad time.

Sorry if this is too much of a downer.

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Response to 3Hotdogs (Reply #4)

Mon Jan 13, 2020, 08:04 AM

7. On my more positive side, mortgage is paid off. SS and pension come in, regular.

There is money left at the end of the month.

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Response to 3Hotdogs (Reply #4)

Mon Jan 13, 2020, 01:25 PM

14. Not a downer, feel free to share, our emotional health is as important as

and linked to our physical health.
My grandfather was diagnosed with depression in his later years, the family laughed it off as a big joke so he never got help, he suffered needlessly his last decade. Closing in on 70 myself, so something I need to watch.
All the best to you.

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Response to raccoon (Original post)

Mon Jan 13, 2020, 07:19 AM

5. I'm thinner and healthier. Traveling more solo and going

to more exotic places.

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Response to sinkingfeeling (Reply #5)

Mon Jan 13, 2020, 07:42 AM

6. My job was stimulating but also stressful. Now that I'm retired and in my 70s,

I finally lost a lot of weight, and I feel like I'm years younger because of the way my body moves now. I bought a house and moved to a new city, near one of my daughters. The most negative thing was that my husband has major depression and now lives in assisted living in another city, near our son. Nothing I did helped him at all.

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Response to greymattermom (Reply #6)

Sat Jan 18, 2020, 06:33 AM

17. I am so sorry about your husband.

I hope that his situation, living in assisted living in another city and near your son, is good.

I sincerely hope that your life, going forward, is good.

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Response to raccoon (Original post)

Mon Jan 13, 2020, 08:45 AM

8. I am 72

and my husband (also 72) were shocked by how suddenly and sharply our long-term memory declined and in some cases disappeared. Most of the time, I know the word I want. I can *see* what I'm thinking of, especially when a name is involved, but I can't recall the word or name. If I consciously stop trying to remember, after a while it will come to me.

I can't emphasize enough how sudden and dramatic this was. I'm a lazy do-nothing, but my husband works out hard, with a trainer, three times a week, and he's as bad as I am, so I'm not sure exercise helps.

Another thing, something exercise *would* help I guess, is that my upper body strength has gone all to hell. I have a lot of trouble with finger strength--pulling paper labels off and so on.

About a year ago I was enjoying getting old and said I felt like I was 50. No longer.

Watch out. It happens overnight.

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Response to cyclonefence (Reply #8)

Sat Jan 18, 2020, 06:45 AM

18. I'm genuinely distressed that for both of you

that your long-term memory has declined. I'm a year younger, 71, and so far I have not experienced any such declines.

I do know that a lot of cognitive declines can be gradual or subtle. I have a good friend, a man who is turning 80 in May, and who is planning a trip to Hawaii for his birthday, Hooray for him! who does have (to me) noticeable memory lapses. In his case they are short term memory things, as in I'll be telling him something and he'll get a bit confused, question me about what I've just said, and then seem to be okay. I do concentrate on not being impatient with him. After all, I might be the same way in similar situations and not recognize it. But honestly, in the time I've known him, I do think I'm seeing a decline in his cognitive function.

Which does make me give a lot of thought as to how I might want to make sure I'm taken care of when my cognitive function declines too much. And how would I (or those around me) know?

My friend is a single (gay) man. He has friends. He has a sister in our city. He recently made a new will, and I know that because I was a witness to the signing of it.

His situation has made me think a LOT about end of life issues. Those issues are difficult. They're problematical. All I can say is please think about them. And do what seems necessary and appropriate.

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Response to raccoon (Original post)

Mon Jan 13, 2020, 09:21 AM

9. I will be 72 in June...

I am more selective about who I spend my time with...have jettisoned all the trumpers. I had a wonderful job as a high School librarian and I have been retired for 15 years. We have always had a very active social life but now I find I love being at home more than anything. Both of our sons live out of state...one in Maine and one in Ohio, so we travel often to visit them. I have been selling or giving away as much of my "stuff" as possible...I find all that stuff a burden and I do not want the kids to deal with it. If it weren't for all the trump bullshit, I would say this is a good time in my life. In fact, I am truly embracing it today. I have a 4 hour appointment today with one of my students who is a hairdresser and I am going grey!! Sick of coloring my hair! It will be a change but I am ready to own the 70s!! Happy soon birthday and enjoy!

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Response to raccoon (Original post)

Mon Jan 13, 2020, 09:45 AM

10. I thought you meant in an

historical sense. The history we have lived through is amazing. Personally, it is freeing. Each day is a gift and I marvel at my beautiful world here in Northern California. I traveled the world for my work when younger, now I am happiest with my dogs and my home. Just as planned in my older years, my world has become smaller. Content.

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Response to raccoon (Original post)

Mon Jan 13, 2020, 10:08 AM

11. I don't think you can separate the physical

from the emotional and mental. How I am doing physically is directly tied to my overall well being.

Things that started in my 60s have progressed into my 70s - I'm 72. Without going into a litany of ailments and physical limitations, I'll just say that aging is not for the faint of heart.

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Response to lillypaddle (Reply #11)

Mon Jan 13, 2020, 10:20 AM

12. Its not but it certainly beats the only possible alternative!

Getting older is sooo much better than I thought it was going to be!

Ailments and all.

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Response to raccoon (Original post)

Sat Jan 18, 2020, 06:30 AM

16. Meh. Not much.

I can certainly tell I'm not as young as I used to be, but I don't feel at all different from 20 or even 30 years ago.

I'm 71. I'm the healthiest person I know at my age. I don't take any medications. I have almost no limitations on what I can do, compared to a decade or two ago.

It's possible that not having grandchildren (I have one grown son who is highly unlikely to give me grandchildren) makes a difference. It's hard to be sure. Because I have friends and a sister with grandchildren, and through them realize the genuine joy involved; nonetheless I think that no grandchildren has helped keep me young. I will hasten to point out that I was 34 years old when I had my first child. Not terribly old, but certainly not young. And as I went through the years of being a parent (mom, in case that matters) I came to think that being a slightly older parent did keep me somewhat young.

But back to your question. I relocated from Overland Park KS to Santa Fe NM 11 years ago, right before I turned 60. I made the move because of a divorce. The relocation was the best possible thing for me. I can say that Santa Fe is a wonderful place for an older woman to re-invent herself. I have no idea what it's like for a man, but I hope it would be as good. I will say that I wouldn't want to be a young person here, as they roll up the sidewalks at 9pm. I had the good fortune to have my dissipated youth in the Washington DC area. After the Pill, and before AIDS, if that matters.

My personal story aside, I think that what truly matters the most is your personal health. If you are very healthy, there won't be a lot of difference between you 60s and your 70s. If you're experiencing health problems, there will be a difference. But no matter what, your personal attitude matters. If you're confident and optimistic, you'll do well. If you're defeatist and pessimistic, not so well.

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