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Tue Jun 12, 2018, 07:29 PM

My veins hide.

Had some blood taken for lab work today.
The older I get, the harder it is to find a useable vein.
He found a 'good' one and as soon as the needle went in, the vein went flat.
Good thing I'm not 'needle-shy' and have a fairly high pain threshold.
He was digging for paydirt and kept saying "Sorry, man. Sorry, man."

And I kept saying "It's OK, it's OK."

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Arrow 19 replies Author Time Post
Reply My veins hide. (Original post)
trof Jun 12 OP
shraby Jun 12 #1
trof Jun 12 #3
tazkcmo Jun 12 #9
FarPoint Jun 12 #2
trof Jun 12 #4
Phoenix61 Jun 12 #5
trof Jun 12 #10
Phoenix61 Jun 12 #12
Crutchez_CuiBono Jun 12 #6
madamesilverspurs Jun 12 #7
Rebl2 Jun 12 #13
Ohiogal Jun 12 #8
trof Jun 12 #11
Duppers Jun 12 #14
Runningdawg Jun 13 #15
trof Jun 13 #16
shanti Aug 8 #17
PoindexterOglethorpe Thursday #18
trof Friday #19

Response to trof (Original post)

Tue Jun 12, 2018, 07:34 PM

1. Are you taking a diuretic for high blood pressure:

I relaxes the veins to help lower the blood pressure, but it also makes it harder to get a useable vein.

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Response to shraby (Reply #1)

Tue Jun 12, 2018, 07:38 PM

3. Yep. Getting old sux.

Also...this was prep for a C T scan, so nothing by mouth for 4 hours beforehand.
So I couldn't hydrate to try and 'plump up' the veins.
Plus the facility is at about 65 degrees so it's all working against you.
And they don't much care.
Just have a job to do.
meh

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Response to shraby (Reply #1)

Tue Jun 12, 2018, 07:48 PM

9. Mine stick way out

But the cold definitely causes them to hide and I'm not on any meds. Glad you're not afraid of needles because I am and would have been climbing the walls.

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Response to trof (Original post)

Tue Jun 12, 2018, 07:37 PM

2. You may need to hydrate if it's not a fasting blood lab draw.

Increase fluids for several days prior really helps veins from going flat.

Warm compresses to vein site helps perk up veins as well

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Response to FarPoint (Reply #2)

Tue Jun 12, 2018, 07:39 PM

4. See 3. Wish I could have. Catch 22.

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Response to trof (Original post)

Tue Jun 12, 2018, 07:40 PM

5. Ask for a smaller needle

They would do that for my mom. Made all the difference in the world.

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Response to Phoenix61 (Reply #5)

Tue Jun 12, 2018, 07:49 PM

10. It was damned near invisible.

But thanks.

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Response to trof (Reply #10)

Tue Jun 12, 2018, 07:50 PM

12. They would use a pediatric one for my mom. nt

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Response to trof (Original post)

Tue Jun 12, 2018, 07:41 PM

6. See Farpoint Above.

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Response to trof (Original post)

Tue Jun 12, 2018, 07:42 PM

7. My veins are like that.

Sometimes it helps to let my hands dangle for a few minutes before a stick. And, for some weird reason, the problem is far less frequent when they use a pediatric needle. There have been times, though, when repeated attempts have failed; that's when they've called in the EMTs who always manage to get the job done. On one occasion, a member of the medical chopper crew answered the call. Keeps things interesting, yeah?


.

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Response to madamesilverspurs (Reply #7)

Tue Jun 12, 2018, 08:02 PM

13. That's what

they have to do with me. I always warn them to use what is called a butterfly on me. It is a much finer needle usually used with children or older folks with small or bad veins.

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Response to trof (Original post)

Tue Jun 12, 2018, 07:46 PM

8. I found the same to be true

When going in for a colonoscopy. They complain your veins have all collapsed and they have trouble starting your IV.

Gee, ya think it's because you were made to rid your body of every last drop of fluid for the previous 12 hours?

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Response to Ohiogal (Reply #8)

Tue Jun 12, 2018, 07:50 PM

11. Bingo

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Response to trof (Original post)

Tue Jun 12, 2018, 08:17 PM

14. I've always had them.

Phlebotomists call mine "rolling veins."

There are two gals "vampires" in my doc's office - when I walk in, they've look at each and one has said, "you're better, she's yours." I must have famous veins.
And I've had more than my share of black and blue arms from people who didn't know how to draw blood from me.

Finding a phlebotomist with expertise is key to not having to be stuck and dug into many times. Seriously.
Good luck!

ps. I look at my arm and cannot see any veins but the gal grabs my arms and starts pressing, sometimes hard, and sometimes slapping me until she finds a good one. "Ah, there it is." She's never has to dig into me as others do.





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Response to trof (Original post)

Wed Jun 13, 2018, 04:54 PM

15. As a nurse who has this problem...

as soon as you hear they are going to draw blood, or when you show up for an appointment knowing they are going to draw blood, ask for a hot pack. You know where they usually hit pay dirt, drop that arm and keep the pack on at least 15 minutes. If you can, walk around. If you haven't had a glass of water in the last hour - drink one. Peds needles usually do work best in these cases. Ask for one before the first stab.

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Response to Runningdawg (Reply #15)

Wed Jun 13, 2018, 05:23 PM

16. Many thanks. I'lll try all that.

I knew about drinking water, but 'nothing by mouth' from midnight on.
It's a Catch 22.

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Response to trof (Original post)

Wed Aug 8, 2018, 02:04 AM

17. Have them draw it from your hand or wrist

I have always had a terrible time getting blood from the normal place, the crook of the arm. So, one time I asked them to place it down lower, and it worked a charm. Most peoples' veins are pretty prominent around the hand. I also use a butterfly needle too. The phlebotomist told me that most people don't like it there, as it's more painful, but I've found it to be the opposite. Worth a try...

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Response to trof (Original post)

Thu Aug 9, 2018, 11:54 PM

18. I am sure they are just shy.

Talk to them, build up their self-confidence, say things like, "It's okay, you can come out now."

Really, all they need is a little encouragement.

Actually, you have my sympathy. I happen to have great veins and it's always easy to get blood from them. Even then, it's no fun to get stuck with a needle.

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Response to PoindexterOglethorpe (Reply #18)

Fri Aug 10, 2018, 04:38 PM

19. chuckle

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