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Tue Jan 12, 2021, 06:27 PM

Florida background checks for guns skyrocket in first days of 2021

https://www.clickorlando.com/news/local/2021/01/12/florida-background-checks-for-guns-skyrocket-in-first-days-of-2021/

ORLANDO, Fla. – With more than 30 years of selling guns under his gun belt, John Lassiter, of Addison’s Gun Shop in Kissimmee, has seen his industry revolve between gun-lows and gun-highs. The highs he has a name for.

“I call this a ‘gun run.’ We have been through gun runs before,” Lassiter said. “After Sandy Hook, everyone started buying up guns because they thought that might be their last chance to own an AR-15.”

But never in his 30 years -- even after the Sandy Hook massacre, Marjorie Stoneman Douglas mass shooting and the 2016 election -- Lassiter said he’s never seen gun sales like he has recently.

“I had a quad-triple year last year in classes. We usually do one class a week. I was doing five classes a week, all summer,” Lassiter said.

(Excerpt)

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Response to Dial H For Hero (Original post)

Tue Jan 12, 2021, 06:33 PM

1. A neighbor down the street sold bulk ammo at gun shows. He said he was a card carrying Repuke

but Dems were GREAT for his business... I guess he's raking it in now sad to say...
m

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Response to mitch96 (Reply #1)

Tue Jan 12, 2021, 11:18 PM

3. A lot off pepple are making money selling ammunition as a side business right now.

Keep an eye out for online retailers selling ammo at pre-Covid prices. The moment it appears (you have to move fast, it sells out in a couple of minutes) buy every bit of it you can. As soon as it arrives, immediatley list it on Gunbroker for 2 to 3 times what you paid for it.

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Response to Dial H For Hero (Reply #3)

Tue Jan 12, 2021, 11:51 PM

4. Personally I don't want anything to do with this commodity trading... nt

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Response to mitch96 (Reply #4)

Wed Jan 13, 2021, 12:17 AM

5. It's not exactly risky. If one can find (for instance) someone selling Winchester .30-30 ammunition

for $15 a box, there isn't the slightest chance of losing money on it if it's turned around on Gunbroker. It will sell for at least $30 a box when auctioned, likely around $40 to $50 a box.

Mind you, finding ammo at pre-Covid prices is the trick.....

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Response to Dial H For Hero (Reply #5)

Wed Jan 13, 2021, 12:26 AM

6. Like I said, not for me but if it blows your skirt up, go for it.. Maybe you could make some $$$

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Response to Dial H For Hero (Reply #5)

Wed Jan 13, 2021, 10:40 AM

7. Ah yes! The feared and dangerous Winchester 94 segment of the trump gun posse!

They just can't get enough of that .30-30 ammo for their public demonstrations, can they?







(Sarcasm alert, because one is always needed on gun threads.)

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Response to Paladin (Reply #7)

Sat Feb 6, 2021, 03:27 PM

8. *sigh* Okay, let's discuss this.

Ammo makers only have so many machines to make ammunition. And there are lots more types of ammo than there are machines to make it. For example, even making a single cartridge means making multiple loadings of your product line.

And some ammo sells more than others. .223 Remington is going to out-sell the .22-250, and 9mm Luger is going to outsell .38 Super, etc.


So this is how I believe the big ammo companies run things:

Some machines make same cartridges all the time, because demand is consistently high. Examples included .22 LR, 9mm, .38 Special, .357 Magnum, .380 Auto, .45 ACP, .40 S&W, 10mm Auto, .223 Remington, and 7.62x39.

Some machines are constantly making smaller batches of ammo and being retooled on a regular basis. Once a batch of ammo is made it might not be made again for years. For example, the .358 Winchester, the .35 Whelen, and the .375 Ruger.

I'm going to guess that the .30-30 falls into the second category. Demand is low, so production is low and therefore it's equally hard to find.

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Response to krispos42 (Reply #8)

Sat Feb 6, 2021, 08:56 PM

9. Sensible explanation. (nt)

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Response to Dial H For Hero (Original post)

Tue Jan 12, 2021, 06:39 PM

2. Of course they did! Nt

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