HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Topics » Arts & Humanities » American History (Group) » "Wounded Knee Massacre" ....

Sat May 1, 2021, 09:38 AM

"Wounded Knee Massacre" ..Proof we fail to teach about .. genocide of Native Americans.

Last edited Sat May 1, 2021, 11:52 AM - Edit history (1)

Did you know about this? Probably Not............

"....An 1890 massacre left some 250 Native Americans dead, in what was the final clash between federal troops and the Sioux. Old people, women and children. On purpose by an leader in the military..
.......................................................................................................................................

from the link below
By the time the massacre was over, more than 250 men, women and children of the Lakota had been killed and 51 were wounded (4 men and 47 women and children, some of whom died later); some estimates placed the number of dead as high as 300.[3]

You haven't heard about the ...Massacre at Wounded Knee, have you?

... total proof that we do not teach about "genocide of Native Americans"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wounded_Knee_Massacre

17 replies, 1097 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 17 replies Author Time Post
Reply "Wounded Knee Massacre" ..Proof we fail to teach about .. genocide of Native Americans. (Original post)
Stuart G May 1 OP
quaint May 1 #1
hlthe2b May 1 #2
Stuart G May 1 #3
hlthe2b May 1 #8
LongtimeAZDem May 1 #5
FoxNewsSucks May 1 #4
Stuart G May 1 #6
sanatanadharma May 1 #7
brewens May 1 #9
Bayard May 1 #10
Sneederbunk May 1 #11
Stuart G May 1 #12
tulipsandroses May 1 #13
Stuart G May 1 #14
niyad May 1 #15
MarcA May 1 #16
Grumpy Old Guy May 1 #17

Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Sat May 1, 2021, 09:54 AM

1. We know because of the Siege of Wounded Knee and Sacheen Littlefeather.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Sat May 1, 2021, 09:59 AM

2. Did you never read the best seller, "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" by Dee Brown?

Published in 1970 with a film adaptation in 2007.

The book came out a mere three years following the rise of American Indian Activism and AIM (American Indian Movement). The tragic crack-down on the group by the FBI a few years later led to what I fully believe was the tragic politically motivated murder charge toward Leonard Pelletier who languishes in prison to this day, long beyond normal incarceration for most white defendants- despite decades of attempts to free him

The publication of Brown's book came at the height of the American Indian Movement's activism. In 1969, AIM occupied Alcatraz Island for 19 months in hopes of reclaiming Native American land after the San Francisco Indian Center burned down.[7] In 1973, less than three years after the book's release, AIM and local Oglala and neighboring Sicangu Lakota took part in a 71-day occupation at Wounded Knee[8] in protest of the government of Richard Wilson, the chairman of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, which resulted in the death of two Indians and injury of the US Marshal.[9] The resulting 1974 trial ended in the dismissal of all charges due to the uncovering of various incidents of government misconduct.




So, yeah, I know all about this and find it horrific that more do not.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hlthe2b (Reply #2)

Sat May 1, 2021, 10:05 AM

3. At the link below, I reference this book..post 12..

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Stuart G (Reply #3)

Sat May 1, 2021, 10:55 AM

8. ...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hlthe2b (Reply #2)

Sat May 1, 2021, 10:12 AM

5. We read this in Junior High School

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Sat May 1, 2021, 10:12 AM

4. In the late-70's a guy in our class had that book,

"Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee". I think it was my sophomore year. We had never heard of Wounded Knee, and even though he explained it, I don't think we really understood. That was the only time I ever heard of it, except for a couple years that I lived in SD.

It's not in the history books for the same reason that Tulsa's Wall Street isn't in them.



Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to FoxNewsSucks (Reply #4)

Sat May 1, 2021, 10:21 AM

6. Tulsa's Wall Street-May 31, 1921-300 people died, 800 injured..I think I heard of it once, long ago.

In 1921, Tulsa, Oklahoma’s Greenwood District, known as Black Wall Street, was one of the most prosperous African-American communities in the United States. But on May 31 of that year, the Tulsa Tribune reported that a black man, Dick Rowland, attempted to rape a white woman, Sarah Page. Whites in the area refused to wait for the investigative process to play out, sparking two days of unprecedented racial violence. Thirty-five city blocks went up in flames, 300 people died, and 800 were injured. Defense of white female virtue was the expressed motivation for the collective racial violence.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Sat May 1, 2021, 10:39 AM

7. So many massacres, so many names, not all known, a few mentioned in passing

From New England to Sand Creek, Colorado to California's shores, the colorless people have proved the immorality of supremacy.

This evil of colorlessness is widespread.

In Uruguay, in 1831, the now extinct Charrúa were massacred by the Uruguayan Army on the banks of the Salsipuedes* Creek *Spanish for "Get-out-if-you-can"

Those who could were later killed or taken into slavery.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Sat May 1, 2021, 11:03 AM

9. We got Wounded Knee and the attack on the bonus camp from my high school

history teacher. He was unusual though. I'm sure he was the only one of the three at my school in the 70's that taught that. We learned a lot of things that were not in the book and you had to take good notes. Some of that was on the tests.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Sat May 1, 2021, 11:10 AM

10. Read, "Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee"

In high school. Recently bought it again to re-read. Along with, "Custer Died For Your Sins".

When the take back over happened in the 70's, my best friend and I were waving our fists, and saying, "Red Power." No one knew what the hell we were talking about except our History teacher.

It should be required reading. Rethugs would say its, "Un-American....."

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Sat May 1, 2021, 11:15 AM

11. It upsets me greatly that the Buffalo Soldiers were involved in the Native American genocide.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Sat May 1, 2021, 11:16 AM

12. It is not American History, but Massacre History..Armenian Genocide

The Armenian Genocide was the systematic mass murder and ethnic cleansing of around one million ethnic Armenians from Anatolia and adjoining regions by the Ottoman Empire and its ruling party, the Committee of Union and Progress, during World War 1. 1915 - 1917..

I was discussing the holocaust and a student in my class, said, "Why aren't you discussing the.... Armenian Genocide? and I knew nothing about that. She was Armenian, and I was teaching in a mixed school of all ethnic types in Chicago.

The neighborhood from the school's population of students was verydiverse from all parts of the world. Maybe 25 languages were spoken in the halls by students from different countries
But....in most classes, only English was spoken, and going to that school was
part o the students ....experience at learning English. Most if not all wanted to become "citizens" of
the U.S.A. and were leaning English as part of ..."life", just like all immigrants did..My grandparents did
exactly the same..Their language was Yiddish, and they did not speak very good English.


Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Sat May 1, 2021, 11:22 AM

13. Much of what many people know about Native Americans, comes from old western movies

The " redman" coming to get the white man.

This is all part of the systemic racism that people are pushing back against. Rick Santorum earlier this week said " we birthed a nation from nothing". The caucasity of that statement is stunning. Giving voice that America is the birthright of white people. No mention of the violence against the native people. I guess this was just an inconvenient necessity just as slavery was a necessity.

A while ago, I read that Martin Scorsese and Robert Deniro were working on a movie about the Osage murders

As best-selling author David Grann details in his new book, “Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI,” the Osage reservation was soaked in blood because it was awash in oil. Driven from their lands in Kansas, the Osage had bought a swath of northeast Oklahoma in the early 1870s. The rocky, barren reservation promised to yield little—with the exception of their desire to be left alone—until the discovery of one of the largest oil deposits in the United States below the surface.

[link:https://www.history.com/news/the-fbis-first-big-case-the-osage-murders|

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to tulipsandroses (Reply #13)

Sat May 1, 2021, 11:39 AM

14. Well...today I learned about ..".The Osage Murders." Thank You for teaching me of that..

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Sat May 1, 2021, 11:45 AM

15. The Sand Creek Massacre. Nov. 29, 1864. Between 70 to 500 Cheyenne and Arapahoe,,

mostly women, children and elders, encamped under a flag of truce, massacred, mutilated, body parts carried like trophies by chivington and his drunken band of murderers.

We were not taught about this in Colorado history.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Sat May 1, 2021, 12:19 PM

16. Genocide: an integral part of Tribalism. n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Sat May 1, 2021, 04:48 PM

17. Wounded Knee is just one example.

There is also the Cherokee "Trail of Tears" and the Navajo "Long Walk."

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread