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Wed Feb 5, 2020, 01:56 PM

what about after they cross over.

he's 14, blind. he gets around okay, but I know it's not far off

I want to take my little buddy (8lbs maybe) to a quiet woods somewhere. probably impractical, I live in large metro area.

not in the yard please.

thinking of cremation. well with-in budget. what have others done.

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Response to KG (Original post)

Wed Feb 5, 2020, 02:02 PM

1. A friend has the vet (I think) cremate her dogs when they pass. She keeps the ashes.

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Response to KG (Original post)

Wed Feb 5, 2020, 02:05 PM

2. I would bury him in a place that was home to him.

Most likely that was your yard, but you don't want to do that.
You could cremate him and keep his ashes or scatter them in the yard.
I just couldn't imagine burying him in the woods, where his body could be dug up and eaten by scavengers.
Of course, those are just my opinions. Do what feels right to you.

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Response to KG (Original post)

Wed Feb 5, 2020, 02:05 PM

3. Just ask for ashes to be returned. Then do what you want with them.

It's a fairly small quantity. As long as you're not scattering or burying them in a downtown park or anything like that, I doubt anyone would notice.

It's what they leave in your heart that stays with you forever.

encouragingly,
Bright

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Response to KG (Original post)

Wed Feb 5, 2020, 02:10 PM

4. we did it both ways

with our two little doggies. We had the second one cremated because it was so heartbreaking for my husband to bury the body which we had brought home from the vet. But we have both in the backyard under small unmarked brick headstones which have meaning to us when we look out and see them. We buried the ashes of the second one, a very small excavation which can be done anywhere. We keep their collars in a little cedar box on our mantel.

I feel for you. The loss is terrible. But in time you'll smile again from the memories.

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Response to KG (Original post)

Wed Feb 5, 2020, 02:11 PM

5. I have mine cremated. Last summer the cost was $30 for euthanasia and $120 for cremation.

The ashes came back sealed in plastic and in a decorative wooden box. I have the option to keep the ashes, bury them or scatter them. No worries about the corpse spreading disease, getting dug up by scavengers, or drawing vermin.

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Response to KG (Original post)

Wed Feb 5, 2020, 02:17 PM

6. I've done both

Back when I lived in a suburban neighborhood, I had them cremated, then planted a tree over the ashes.

These days, I have a whole little cemetery, and I still talk to my kids.

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Response to Bayard (Reply #6)

Wed Feb 5, 2020, 02:41 PM

8. This is the way to do it.

My wishes for my own mortal form are to offer it up for donation(s) if possible, then cremation, then mix the cremains with bone meal or some other fertilizer and plant a tree.

Every single one of us is composed of atoms that came from somewhere else and that have been serving and then transforming since the beginning of time.

What better way to live on and serve the great cause of life than to give one's substance in the growth of new life?

As a tree, my component molecules could grow for centuries. The tree would turn carbon dioxide into oxygen for animals to breathe. Birds and squirrels could raise their families within "my" branches and song and silly squirrel antics would bring beauty and laughter.

It is certainly a worthy fate for a canine companion. They are about enduring love and generosity of the spirit.

Perhaps a dogwood would be too on the nose. It might be interesting to see if your dog responds to the sound or scent of a particular leaf or needle. That way, perhaps he could lead you to his proper memorial.

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Response to KG (Original post)

Wed Feb 5, 2020, 02:19 PM

7. Be sure to check the cremation type

An individual cremation is more expensive but, imho, worth it. That way you are getting your petís remains back, alone. At some vets the service they offer is bulk cremation, where many pets are done at the same time. I didnít realize this until I worked at a vet.

I keep the ashes of all my babies in pretty wooden boxes and urns that match their personalities. I like to talk to them and like knowing they are close.

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Response to KG (Original post)

Wed Feb 5, 2020, 02:49 PM

9. I have 11 cedar boxes with the ashes of 11 beloved pets. My will and

instructions state that I be cremated and my ashes mixed with those in the 11 boxes. Whether they are then buried or dumped into the wind doesn't matter. We will be together again.

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Response to sinkingfeeling (Reply #9)

Wed Feb 5, 2020, 04:42 PM

13. That is what I wrote in my trust.

My dog's ashes and mine will both go around my first dog's favorite tree at the park where her ashes already are. I even made a hand drawn, to-scale map. The lawyer said a lot of people do this.

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Response to KG (Original post)

Wed Feb 5, 2020, 03:37 PM

10. My beloved cats are buried in a flower bed in the yard

Both spots are covered with large flat stones. I was cleaning debris out of the bed this weekend and came across the rocks, now partially covered with oregano. It has been almost 20 years since Taffy and Tippy crossed Rainbow Bridge - I'm glad they were buried in the flower bed.

When the time comes, Zeus Dog will have to be ashes. I don't mean to be blunt, but he is too large for me to bury properly in an urban yard flower bed.

Whatever you decide to do will be right for you.

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Response to zeusdogmom (Reply #10)

Wed Feb 5, 2020, 03:53 PM

11. thanks.

I rent, and the back yard is a bit of mess. have never even considered it.

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Response to KG (Reply #11)

Wed Feb 5, 2020, 05:08 PM

14. Whole different story when you rent

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Response to KG (Original post)

Wed Feb 5, 2020, 03:58 PM

12. Our beloved doggie,

who crossed the bridge in November, has her ashes scattered on the nature trail she loved to run.

She was fourteen and a half.

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Response to KG (Original post)

Wed Feb 5, 2020, 06:19 PM

15. After they cross over all the pets you've had at different stages of your life will meet each other.

I enjoy imagining that.

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Response to KG (Original post)

Wed Feb 5, 2020, 09:33 PM

16. Roxie...

Our Roxie left us at 14 years of age... we had her cremated and she occupies a prominent spot on our bookshelf.. we held a memorial for her and our children, grandchildren and neighbors came to celebrate her life as a beloved member of our family... it was three years before we felt we were ready to get another rescue and we're so happy we did...









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