HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Topics » Home & Family » Pets (Group) » New dog; he bites

Tue Dec 31, 2019, 03:38 PM

New dog; he bites

I tried everything


No food play (can't feed him), no taking things he thinks are his (peas spilled on the floor), no ignore (bites me on the arm), no just sitting around on the computer. Bites all the time. I love my husband and Blake too; I'm just terrified he's going to make more than holes the next time.

23 replies, 612 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 23 replies Author Time Post
Reply New dog; he bites (Original post)
Piasladic Dec 31 OP
Backseat Driver Dec 31 #1
Piasladic Dec 31 #2
Polly Hennessey Dec 31 #3
Piasladic Dec 31 #13
OnDoutside Dec 31 #4
Piasladic Dec 31 #5
OnDoutside Dec 31 #6
stopdiggin Dec 31 #7
Piasladic Dec 31 #8
Piasladic Dec 31 #9
BigmanPigman Dec 31 #10
avebury Dec 31 #15
radical noodle Jan 1 #19
IndyOp Jan 1 #21
IndyOp Jan 1 #22
avebury Dec 31 #14
Karadeniz Dec 31 #11
Piasladic Dec 31 #12
Boomer Dec 31 #17
avebury Dec 31 #16
TexasBushwhacker Jan 1 #18
phylny Jan 1 #20
Piasladic Jan 1 #23

Response to Piasladic (Original post)

Tue Dec 31, 2019, 03:47 PM

1. How old is your new furbaby?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Backseat Driver (Reply #1)

Tue Dec 31, 2019, 03:49 PM

2. just over a year / in the pound for almost a year before

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Piasladic (Original post)

Tue Dec 31, 2019, 03:52 PM

3. I rescued a 7-month old mixed breed

(German Shepherd, Lab, Pittie). She looks like a street dog or as we call her, the big chihuahua. She nipped all the time. It took some time but she no longer nips/bites. Lots of love/respect and consistency. My mantra to her was “no bite”. She has become a wonderful and loving dog. It helps that they mature out of most of their puppy behavior. Keep at it you will win.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Polly Hennessey (Reply #3)

Tue Dec 31, 2019, 07:13 PM

13. nips I can deal with... bites, not so much

Two weeks after the last real bite, I still have marks and bruises. Then, he nipped me again yesterday (left a mark, never bites my husband - his primary keeper). Our dog is over a year. I worry that if we tell the vet, she'll take him, and he'll be killed.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Piasladic (Original post)

Tue Dec 31, 2019, 03:57 PM

4. Can you get the dog professionally trained ? I know it would be added

cost but it might be cheaper in the long run.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to OnDoutside (Reply #4)

Tue Dec 31, 2019, 03:58 PM

5. We are thinking about that

We both love the dog,
but most places won't take him. (pit bull mix)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Piasladic (Reply #5)

Tue Dec 31, 2019, 03:59 PM

6. You'd be paying for peace of mind then.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Piasladic (Original post)

Tue Dec 31, 2019, 04:00 PM

7. You need help.

If this behavior is not modified ... The animal doesn't belong in a home .. or around humans. I'm deadly serious here. And please, please, please .. NEVER around children. Under ANY circumstances.

You need to be extremely careful. And you need help.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to stopdiggin (Reply #7)

Tue Dec 31, 2019, 04:03 PM

8. We don't have kids

But I think you're right. I'll talk to my husband.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Piasladic (Reply #8)

Tue Dec 31, 2019, 04:42 PM

9. We live in Podunk, FL.

Apparently, living in Sumter County, Florida, means there aren't a lot of resources for us.

There is nothing but Ocala or Tampa (both hours away), and they will not take a mix like him.

We have three choices: (1/3) lie about why we returned him to the SPCA (and risk others being bitten), (2/3) tell the truth about how he has bitten both my father-in-law and me ... death in two weeks, or (3/3), or just pretend it's going to be better, and I'll get bitten a lot on the way.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Piasladic (Reply #9)

Tue Dec 31, 2019, 05:31 PM

10. That breed is very smart and learns

quickly. Defiantly try to find a trainer or teach yourself how to do it. What have you tried as behavior modification? How did you train your other dog?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Piasladic (Reply #9)

Tue Dec 31, 2019, 09:38 PM

15. Reviewing your 3 choices how can you

think that it is ok to lie about the dog? Ignoring the problem won’t make it go away. What do you will happen if anybody gets bitten badly enough to need to see a doctor? Let me be blunt, you are the kind of neighbor that I would not want to have living next door. Unless you can get that dog under control and keep it under control, you are living a lawsuit waiting to happen.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Piasladic (Reply #9)

Wed Jan 1, 2020, 03:13 AM

19. Try calling this one... I've heard good things about them

https://www.carlosramirezk9.com/pettraining

Notice that they say bad behavior can often be quickly transformed. I know you said Ocala is too far (you must live on the south end of Sumter County (?) but if you could retrain him in just a few visits, it would be well worth it.

BTW, I have absolutely no connection with their company, and am not paid to advertise them... just in case anyone mistakes this for spam.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Piasladic (Reply #9)

Wed Jan 1, 2020, 10:27 AM

21. I'd suggest that you immediately take over as much of the

primary care as you can - you feed him, you give him treats instead of your husband. Hubby may be sad, but dog needs to learn that you are the giver of all food. Depending on the level of aggression, you may need hubby to hold him on leash, then you tell him to sit, put down the dog food and step back before hubby lets go of the leash. Feed him two to three times a day - once a day is too little.

If you can walk him - at least occasionally - then do that. Even short walks round the block. Take hubby with you, but you hold the leash.

I don’t know if he gets to get up on your furniture? If he thinks you displace him on the couch or on the bed, he will be aggressive. No dogs on furniture at any time for the next 6-12 months or longer.

Doing these things may improve your safety in the short run and you will still need to train him and overtrain him to obey you and your husband. No matter the cause of his aggression, training can be a huge part of the solution.

Also exercise!! Exercise!! Exercise!!

Find a private trainer who uses positive reinforcement to modify behavior - not punishers (like shock collars) or “alpha dog” / leader of the pack / hierarchy shit. Tell the trainer about the aggression - they can’t help if you don’t tell the truth.

Dog trainer certification
https://apdt.com/category/choosing-trainer/

Locate certified trainers
https://apps.apdt.com/eweb/DynamicPage.aspx?webcode=TrainerSearch&SearchZip=33601&SearchRadius=100&certified=1

All trainers near Tampa who are listed on the APDT site

https://apps.apdt.com/eweb/DynamicPage.aspx?webcode=TrainerSearch&SearchZip=33601&SearchRadius=100&certified=1




Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Piasladic (Reply #9)

Wed Jan 1, 2020, 10:35 AM

22. Last word -

Ignore the “emotional vibe” advice - when you learn new effective ways to train doggo, your anxiety will naturally decline. Trying to change what you are thinking to cause big changes in your dog’s behavior is an sort of “easy way out / too good to be true” type of solution. Training is hard work for everyone - yourself, your husband, and your dog - but at just over one year of age, settling into new home, is the exact right time to do it.

My advice comes from having a Boxer from the shelter who was a biter when we got him and from some professional expertise in behavior modification with people - same principles apply.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to stopdiggin (Reply #7)

Tue Dec 31, 2019, 09:25 PM

14. Agreed.

He has the potential to become a legal liability to you as well as a physical one. There are a lot of oitbull and/or pit mixes in my neighborhood, some of which could be dangerous if they get loose. One day one got out and would have killed my fur baby if I had not been able to use a big ass stick to create a barrier between me and my dog and the pit while his owner tried to grab him. The dog did his best to avoid being grabbed by his owner while going after my dog. Had the owner not been around it might have become a very dangerous situation with harm to myself and possibly death to my dog.

If your dog continually bite you, he is a risk to anybody else that he comes into contact with. And you are already on notice that he poses a danger. You face the potential for both criminal and civil problems if you cannot get him and keep him under control.

Nobody has asked you if you when was the last time you received a tetanus shot and if the dog is current on all of its shots.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Piasladic (Original post)

Tue Dec 31, 2019, 05:45 PM

11. Have you taught him to make eye contact? If you give him one

Kibble while he's in a sit and calm, he shouldn't nip. If he gets excited and lunges, pull the kibble away...try again when he's calm. You can give him an entire meal this way.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Karadeniz (Reply #11)

Tue Dec 31, 2019, 06:55 PM

12. I'll try

I've tried making negative noises like "NO" when he gets mouthy and growls, but I am sort of afraid about food and him.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Piasladic (Reply #12)

Tue Dec 31, 2019, 09:59 PM

17. Your fear is part of the problem

Young dogs who find themselves in the alpha position are very anxious. They're like a teenage boy acting out. He's under stress because he's feels that he's in charge but he's not confident in that position.

You MUST get the upper hand, and you'll need a professional dog handler to show you how to take charge by being firm and confident.

No matter how much you may love this dog, you're not doing him any favors by letting the situation continue. He could become a danger to others and ultimately to himself.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Piasladic (Original post)

Tue Dec 31, 2019, 09:54 PM

16. Consider this - you are living a life that is

a lawsuit waiting to happen. What do you think will happen if someone gets bitten badly enough to warrant going to the ER/doctor? Failure to get this dog under control and keep it under control, creates the risk of criminal charges (vicious dog issues) and/or civil lawsuit. If he gets too far out of control, a single dog bite might be the least of your troubles. If he snaps, he could seriously harm or kill someone. No way should be allowed near any children or other animals.

I had a neighbor who lived behind me and his pit would jump the fence into my backyard when she got loose. I could never allow my own dog to be i her own backyard for fear of that dog jumping over the fence. Another pit got loose one day while I was walking my dog and he went after my dog to kill her. Thank God the owner was around and I was able to use a large stick to keep it from reaching my dog while the owner had to work to grab his dog. Had the owner not been around I would have probably been seriously injured trying to protect my dog and my dog might have been killed or seriously injured.

An out of control dog is a serious situation.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Piasladic (Original post)

Wed Jan 1, 2020, 12:25 AM

18. Have you considered training him with a muzzle, temporarily

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Piasladic (Original post)

Wed Jan 1, 2020, 08:23 AM

20. Our oldest daughter and her husband had to give up her first dog.

The dog was a rescue and ended up biting our daughter, who needed IV antibiotics after the bite. I'm glad you are taking this seriously.

I was bitten by a dog at someone's house while working. It was through my pants and left a very painful, very large bruise. It's not fun. Good luck.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Piasladic (Original post)

Wed Jan 1, 2020, 07:02 PM

23. Thanks for the help

We went to the vet we know, and I think we can trust her advice. Her first recommendation was to go to the shelter we got him from but we didn't like that, so she recommended another person, another vet , and we're going to try.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread