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Mon Apr 13, 2020, 04:32 PM

Eliminating the middle man when composting.

I've done regular composting in the past and when I did it right, the results were something I was proud of but I kept looking for easier ways to deal with kitchen scraps and other materials. I tried worm composting over the course of one winter and that was a failure. I thought about cutting the bottoms out of old 5 gallon bucket and partially burying them in the raised rows and raised beds with just a few inches of the top of the buckets showing. I'd add the scraps and such to each bucket in turn and the worms would come in from the bottom and do their thing but I never tried that.

What I have done over the past couple of years is to bury the materials directly into the soil in a 4 x 8 sized section of a raised bed that I was leaving go fallow for the season. I'll carry the ice cream pail of materials to the raised bed and bury it in one spot approx. 1 square ft. in size. The next time I go out there with another ice cream pail full, I'll bury in a spot next to the first. I continue this process until I end up back to the first spot and by then, much of the 1st batch has either decomposed or been eaten by worms.

I can't do this during the winter so during that time I put the scraps in a 55 gallon barrel located in the basement. It's quite cool down there and there's no issue with bugs. A few days ago it was nice so I shoveled snow off of one section of the raised bed and dug a trench 12" to 18" deep on the east side. I dump about half of the contents of the barrel into that trench and buried it. I repeated the process on the west side of the raised bed. the soil was wet, not frozen and there were quite a few worms in it. I plan on planting Dwarf Grey Sugar peas in that raised bed sometime from middle to late next month using the square foot gardening method.



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Reply Eliminating the middle man when composting. (Original post)
Kaleva Apr 13 OP
janterry Apr 13 #1
steventh Apr 13 #2
spinbaby May 2 #3
Kaleva May 18 #4

Response to Kaleva (Original post)

Mon Apr 13, 2020, 04:46 PM

1. This is what I do

I have 6 buckets from the winter - I'm going to let them break down a bit more before I bury them. I have one bucket on the back of the stairs (no holes and that I'll bury in the ground when the soil unfreezes.

Everything from now on will get buried straight into the ground.

I keep my buckets in the garage - they basically freeze during the winter.

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Response to Kaleva (Original post)

Mon Apr 13, 2020, 06:47 PM

2. I bury kitchen scraps in my raised beds too.

Every Spring mystery plants show up at the compost places. Last year I got many melon vines and a few avocado trees, none of which I planted but which I allowed as welcome volunteers. Never a dull moment in the garden.

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Response to Kaleva (Original post)

Sat May 2, 2020, 05:43 PM

3. I no longer compost kitchen scraps

I did when we lived out in the country, but now that weíre in town, I donít want to attract critters. Iíve thought of getting one of those fancy rotating compost bins, but my current strategy is just throwing yard waste onto a pile.

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Response to Kaleva (Original post)

Mon May 18, 2020, 02:23 AM

4. Turnnd over the soil where I put the compostable material a month ago & it's pretty much all gone

Last edited Mon May 18, 2020, 07:20 AM - Edit history (1)

Lots of worms.

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