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Fri Mar 15, 2019, 06:59 AM

Kolaches

I have a craft and artisan fair coming up, and I am spending a little time refining some recipes. I have some items I know will go over well at the Farmer's Markets too, one of them is Kolaches. I remember enjoying these treats when I was a child, especially when my family lived in Wisconsin, but I have lived in some places where folks were unfamiliar with this tasty pastry. These versions of Kolache were filled with chunky apple filling and apricot preserves and topped with lemon oil and nutmeg infused cream cheese and a sprinkle of streusel.



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Response to mindem (Original post)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 07:09 AM

1. What? No prune or poppyseed?

They're pretty popular around here with a large Czech population. They come in about every fruit flavor and keilbasa wrapped in the same dough.

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Response to TexasProgresive (Reply #1)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 07:16 AM

3. I love the prune ones,

In fact, my sister has our mothers recipe for the prune filling. Poppyseed sounds really good.

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Response to mindem (Reply #3)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 09:36 AM

10. I find the poppy seed kolach like in your pick don't have enough filling.

My friend's granny who was 100% Czech would make some like this Hungarian kolac, ymm! Why is this diabetic taking part in this discussion? - as he shakes his head. You can buy poppy seed filling in cans even Amazon has it. I looked at a few recipes for making it. My boyhood friend and I would run poppy seeds through a grinder. I remember asking, "Why are we doing this? It looks the same in as out?" He said it cracks them to improve the flavor. Well I guess he was right. None of the recipes I saw spoke of grinding.

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Response to TexasProgresive (Reply #1)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 10:49 AM

13. Poppyseed and cherry!

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Response to mindem (Original post)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 07:16 AM

2. Yum! My friends mom would bake these!

And as stated above, the prune/poppyseed filling is very popular around here.

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Response to mindem (Original post)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 07:21 AM

4. Poor me. Cousins compete for best Kolaches here. We all win.

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Response to mindem (Original post)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 07:45 AM

5. They look wonderful.

I love trying new deserts, I'll try this over the weekend.

Thank you for sharing.

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Response to mindem (Original post)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 08:10 AM

6. I can remember the packages the fillings were sold in when I was a kid. n/t

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Response to mindem (Original post)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 08:25 AM

7. How cruel (sob), all those mouthwatering photos and not

a recipe to be seen. I can't bear it, I'm gonna go search Google before hypoglycemia sets in.

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Response to procon (Reply #7)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 08:45 AM

8. This is the one I used.

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Response to mindem (Reply #8)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 08:54 AM

9. Oh, thank you, I'm dying to try them.

Not today though. Whilst reading recipe ingredients on Google, I find I'm out of everything I might use for a filling. Shopping on Saturday!

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Response to mindem (Original post)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 09:54 AM

11. Darnit, I can't find my recipe from

the Sykora Bakery in Czech Village, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Googling turned up Tori Avey's recipe, which looks similar and very good:

https://toriavey.com/toris-kitchen/kolache/

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Response to Cairycat (Reply #11)

Sat Mar 16, 2019, 06:29 PM

18. I used to live near the Czech village! Out of all the places we've lived, Cedar Rapids is

probably my favorite.

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Response to mindem (Original post)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 10:33 AM

12. I too was raised in a Czech family and we always had the

poppy seed and prune. Sometimes my mom also made apricot. They are truly delicious but I remember them being a big project. Probably because everyone loved them and she had to make so many.
They lived in Texas in an area where many people were Czech and my mom and her sisters and brothers did not speak English well until they went to school.

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Response to mindem (Original post)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 10:50 AM

14. I've seen them made with cottage cheese

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Response to California_Republic (Reply #14)

Fri Mar 15, 2019, 03:07 PM

15. Pot cheese or farmer's cheese if you can get it. n/t

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Response to mindem (Original post)

Sat Mar 16, 2019, 12:03 PM

16. In the late 60's there was a grocery near us

with a bakery that made great kolaches. My mom called the stores main office and asked for the recipe, they said they would send it to her. When she received the recipe it for an industrial size batch, 10-pounds of this, 5-pounds of that etc.

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Response to mindem (Original post)

Sat Mar 16, 2019, 01:52 PM

17. Prune Kringle - Easy Yeast recipe

Prune Kringle - I got recipe from a yeast booklet way back in the 60's It has stood the test of time.

I have made this recipe many times, always a favorite. My daughter's birthday is next week and she has already asked me to make her prune kringle for her birthday. Pineapple preserves make a delicious filling for the Kringle. Cream cheese filling would be good too. This is an easy yeast recipe if you are new to yeast baking.

Dough
cup milk
1/4 cup butter
2 cups flour
cup warm water
cup sugar
2 packages dry yeast - not rapid rise
teaspoon salt
1 egg beaten

Filling
1- cups chopped stewed prunes
3 tablespoons lemon juice
4 tablespoons sugar
teaspoon grated lemon peel
Note: Tthis is an old recipe from back when prunes where sold whole with the seed. Now you can buy a bag of seedless prunes that is just the right amount for this recipe.

Scald milk; cool to lukewarm. Combine the flour, sugar and salt. Cut in the butter with a pastry cutter. Measure warm water into a large warm bowl. Sprinkle the yeast in the water and stir until dissolved. Stir in the lukewarm milk, egg and the flour mixture. Stir until well blended. Place in a greased bowl, turning dough to grease top. Cover; let rise in a warm place, free from draft, until doubled in bulk, about 40 minutes.

Make the filling: Combine the prunes, sugar, lemon juice and lemon peel, set aside.

Punch dough down and turn out onto well-floured board. Divide in half. Roll each half to a 16 x 12 inch rectangle. Place one-half on a greased 15 x 10 x 1 inch pan. Spread with the prune mixture. Cover with the second half of the dough. Seal edges well. Cover; let rise in warm place, free from draft until doubled in bulk, about hour. Bake in moderate oven (375˚ for about 20 minutes until browned.

Remove and place on rack to cool. Frost with icing made with 2 cups powdered sugar mixed with 3 tablespoons milk. Let icing set and cut in squares to serve. Makes one large cake.

I used to make this recipe often to take to family and social gatherings. I would double the recipe and make two kringles, one with prune filling and one with pineapple filling.

Hints for yeast baking.

When dissolving dry yeast in water, add a teaspoon sugar, let stand about 5 minutes or until you see little bubbles forming on top of water.

When putting dough in bowl for first rise ; fill empty bowl with hot water, let stand a few minutes to warm bowl. pour out water, dry bowl and grease as described. This helps in the rising if you have a cool, drafty kitchen like I do.




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