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Fri Jan 11, 2019, 06:25 PM

Danish

It's a rather a slow procedure to make Danish. Anything that involves laminated dough isn't something you rush through. It's best to take your time and do the old "slow build" thing; if you do it correctly, it's a two-day process. Officiating the marriage of beurrage and detrempe, then turn and turn and turn. No shortcuts. Choose just the right fruit filling, give it a dab of cream cheese filling too, don't forget the streusel. Into the oven and wait while the pastry perfume fills the kitchen. Add the final touch of a drizzle of flat icing, then take the first flaky, buttery bite and know it was worth the wait. Are you going to share? Hell no, you're going to eat all of them and then complain about gaining weight.

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Arrow 7 replies Author Time Post
Reply Danish (Original post)
mindem Jan 11 OP
northoftheborder Jan 11 #1
mindem Jan 11 #2
PennyK Jan 11 #3
pansypoo53219 Jan 11 #4
Vinca Saturday #5
dem in texas Tuesday #6
mindem Tuesday #7

Response to mindem (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2019, 06:40 PM

1. Yum. A good recipe source for those?

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Response to northoftheborder (Reply #1)

Fri Jan 11, 2019, 06:50 PM

2. The King Arthur Flour version

is pretty close to the recipe I use. Mine involves locking in a butter block and doing all of the turns etc., pretty close to croissant dough.

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Response to mindem (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2019, 07:49 PM

3. You're taking me back!

In my childhood, in the suburbs, there were always Danish and/or coffee cake, for the moms and their coffee-klatsches, after we annoying kids went off to school. I was always one step away from picking the sugary pecans off the cake!

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Response to mindem (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2019, 08:40 PM

4. i want the kringle.

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Response to mindem (Original post)

Sat Jan 12, 2019, 07:18 AM

5. I haven't had breakfast yet and I think I'd kill for that. Yum!

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Response to mindem (Original post)

Tue Jan 15, 2019, 12:33 AM

6. only made them once

You are right, lots of work, but wonderful results. Yours looked so yummy. I used a recipe booklet from Fleischman's Yeast. It was published in the early 1960's. I was learning how to make yeast breads and sent off for the booklet. The booklet is primer for yeast baking. I made about half of the recipes. Recently my granddaughter was learning to make yeast bread and having problems getting the dough to rise so I found the booklet on Ebay and bought her a copy. There is now a new edition, using rapid rise yeast, which I don't like; doesn't have the same "crumb" to the dough as regular rise yeast does.


Here is easy recipe from the booklet that I have made the most, give it a try. Sometimes I substitute pineapple preserves for the prune filling. Much less work than Danish rolls.

Prune Kringle

Dough
cup milk cup butter
2 cups flour cup warm water
cup sugar 2 packages regular dry yeast
teaspoon salt 1 egg beaten

Filling
1- cups chopped prunes 3 tablespoons lemon juice
4 tablespoons sugar teaspoon grated lemon peel
1/4 cup water

Scald milk; cool to lukewarm. Combine the flour, sugar and salt. Cut in the butter with a pastry cutter. Measure warm water into a large warm bowl. Sprinkle the yeast in the water and stir until dissolved. Stir in the lukewarm milk, egg and the flour mixture. Stir until well blended. Place in a greased bowl, turning dough to grease top. Cover; let rise in a warm place, free from draft, until doubled in bulk, about 40 minutes.

Make the filling: Combine the prunes, sugar, lemon juice, lemon peel and water in a small pan. Bring to boil, reduce heat and cook for about 3 to 5 minutes, remove from heat an set aside.

Punch dough down and turn out onto well-floured board. Divide in half. Roll each half to a 16 x 12 inch rectangle. Place one-half on a greased 15 x 10 x 1 inch pan. Spread with the prune mixture. Cover with the second half of the dough. Seal edges well. Cover; let rise in warm place, free from draft until doubled in bulk, about hour. Bake in moderate oven (375˚ for about 20 minutes until browned.

Remove and place on rack to cool. Frost with icing made with 2 cups powdered sugar mixed with 3 tablespoons milk. Let icing set and cut in squares to serve. Makes one large cake.


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Response to dem in texas (Reply #6)

Tue Jan 15, 2019, 05:27 AM

7. I'll have to give it a whirl

I'll have to find a copy of the booklet too and add it to my collection. I have a cottage baking business and I'm always on the lookout for new recipes. I just got an order for 2 dozen Danish, 2 dozen chocolate croissants, and 1 dozen caramel rolls. I'm going to be a busy kitchen elf over the next couple of days.

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