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Sat Jun 17, 2017, 12:29 AM

hard boiled eggs done right

Get a dozen eggs and shove them to the back of the refrigerator for1 to 2 weeks. Threaten with death all who might touch them.

Put water in a pan and gently add 6 to 12 eggs. Begin time when they start a to boil. Boil 5 minutes. Remove from heat and cover for 13 minutes.
After 13 minutes drain hot wAter and place under cold running water for at least 5 minutes.
Bobs your uncle you can peel and eat immediately or store them for up to two weeks in the fridge.
Not green yolks and little sulphur smell.

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Arrow 21 replies Author Time Post
Reply hard boiled eggs done right (Original post)
LSFL Jun 2017 OP
Phoenix61 Jun 2017 #1
auntAgonist Jun 2017 #15
Phentex Jun 2017 #17
luvMIdog Jun 2017 #2
procon Jun 2017 #3
Motley13 Jun 2017 #12
procon Jun 2017 #13
PoindexterOglethorpe Jun 2017 #4
politicat Jun 2017 #5
Kaleva Jun 2017 #9
Kaleva Jun 2017 #18
politicat Jun 2017 #19
Cicada Jun 2017 #6
Major Nikon Jun 2017 #11
Vinca Jun 2017 #7
northoftheborder Jun 2017 #8
flamin lib Jun 2017 #10
Callalily Jun 2017 #14
auntAgonist Jun 2017 #16
voteearlyvoteoften Aug 2017 #20
Skittles Aug 2017 #21

Response to LSFL (Original post)

Sat Jun 17, 2017, 12:34 AM

1. I cook mine almost that way

only I take them off the burner as soon as they hit a full boil and cover for 15 minutes. Did not know about storing for 2 weeks before boiling.

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Response to Phoenix61 (Reply #1)

Sun Jun 18, 2017, 04:19 PM

15. I do mine the same. The ONLY benefit to storing them for 2 wks is that they are 'older' and shells

peel off easier from older eggs.

Otherwise I do the same.

And ... a water saving note. I do NOT run them under cold water for any length of time at all. I have lots of ice in the feezer so I pile the ice on, over top of the eggs. The ice melts fairly slowly and cools the eggs quickly.
You can waste a LOT of water by running a tap for 5 minutes or more.

aA
kesha

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Response to auntAgonist (Reply #15)

Sun Jun 18, 2017, 05:13 PM

17. That's what I do

they get an ice bath and they seem to like it.

After the ice melts I can use the water on the plants.

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Response to LSFL (Original post)

Sat Jun 17, 2017, 12:38 AM

2. I add mine to boiling water and boil 8 minutes and then drain the pan and then

I bounce the eggs in the pan letting the shells crack and run very cold water over them and I begin peeling them immediately because the peels slide right off. Then I put them in airtight plastic bags. I let them cool before refrigerating . I used to work the salad department in a cafeteria. I can't count how many eggs I did every day.

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Response to LSFL (Original post)

Sat Jun 17, 2017, 12:40 AM

3. Or 3 1/2 minutes in the pressure cooker and the shells slip right off. nt

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Response to procon (Reply #3)

Sat Jun 17, 2017, 03:29 PM

12. Bet you have an Instant Pot

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Response to Motley13 (Reply #12)

Sat Jun 17, 2017, 03:58 PM

13. No, those have a non-standard lower pressure.

All my pressure cookers are stovetop models in various sizes and brands, but they use the standard 15 psi setting. The Instant Pot is only at 11 psi, and despite it's name, it actually cooks slower so hard boiled eggs take 5 minutes.

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Response to LSFL (Original post)

Sat Jun 17, 2017, 12:42 AM

4. Hmmmm. Maybe what I'm doing wrong is the five minutes under cold running water.

One of my favorite light breakfasts is a boiled egg on toast. Here's how I do it: Place an egg in warm water. Turn the burner up to about medium for maybe five minutes. Then I bring it up to a hard boil, turn off the burner and put a lid on. I set the timer for 8 minutes. I then put a piece of bread in the toaster, run the boiled egg under cold water and peel it. I have NEVER mastered peeling a hard boiled egg, so this process involves a lot of muttering. Most of the time the egg is peeled at the same time the toast pops. I butter the toast, place the egg on it, and then slice the egg. Salt and pepper and I'm good to go.

Reasonably quick, low calorie, but high energy.

Oh, and my more limited time results in a yolk that's a bit soft, which is what I like.

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Response to LSFL (Original post)

Sat Jun 17, 2017, 03:26 AM

5. There's a better way that doesn't require the long wait.

Boil the water. When it's rolling, use a slotted spoon or a mesh skimmer to gently lower the eggs into the water. Set your timer for 13 minutes at sea level, about 15 above 5000 feet. (11 minutes is the SeriousEats sea level recommendation, but I think that slightly undercooks the yolk, and up here, water boils well below 212.)

Dump 1.5 quarts of ice cubes into a bowl, with .5 quarts of water. When the timer goes off, use the slotted spoon to get those eggs into the ice bath and leave them alone for 10 minutes.

Crack and roll to loosen the shell, peel in a strip, and rinse any particles of shell. (I admit I use brown eggs most of the time specifically because it's easier to catch shell bits.) I've used eggs laid that morning, eggs three days old, and eggs bought from the supermarket with a month left on the clock (meaning those eggs were probably already 2-3 weeks old.) The only time I've had a difficult egg or one that popped the shell was when I used extremely cold (bottom of the fridge), laid yesterday eggs with no slight warm-up time. First or second day from the chicken eggs should be cooked from room temp, not refrigerator temp.

I make egg salad or deviled eggs at least once a week. I can't remember the last time I had a popped shell or a ripped egg white. I prefer to use (store)recent eggs now; the yolks stay more in the center, so deviled eggs are prettier.

This works because you want the egg white to coagulate first and draw away from the membrane, and you want that protein to lock up FAST. An egg into hot water cooks from the outside in, while a cold start warms everything at the same pace. It's the difference between dropping a piece of meat on a cold, dry stainless skillet and slowly warming up to 550, or dropping the same meat onto a hot grill.

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Response to politicat (Reply #5)

Sat Jun 17, 2017, 10:34 AM

9. I'm going to try your method

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Response to politicat (Reply #5)

Tue Jun 20, 2017, 03:46 PM

18. Boiled 18 eggs using your method and all peeled perfectly!

The egg shells went into the compost and the water, after it cooled, an the ice, after it melted was used to water the outdoor plants.

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Response to Kaleva (Reply #18)

Tue Jun 20, 2017, 11:31 PM

19. SWEET!!

Glad it worked for you! It's so nice when they behave. (I mean, when they don't behave, you get to have an egg right then and there, but it's a pain to have to cook 3 dozen to get 36 deviled eggs and a quart of egg salad and some shells that won't compost well because of the egg protein stuck to them. So on balance... )

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Response to LSFL (Original post)

Sat Jun 17, 2017, 05:04 AM

6. Why do different experts have different instructions?

Clearly someone needs to do an objective study where 10 different instructions are used 10 times each with blind taste testing ratings. The incredible egg, Martha Stewart, my wife, this post, good housekeeping all have different methods. The world cries out for science to resolve this matter. Jeff Bezos has asked for advice on charitable spending. This problem should be in the mix.

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Response to Cicada (Reply #6)

Sat Jun 17, 2017, 02:43 PM

11. Harold McGee is "the" food science guru

He has a few tips on hard cooking eggs in the shell in his legendary book, On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen.

https://www.amazon.com/Food-Cooking-Science-Lore-Kitchen/dp/0684800012

Boiling eggs results in a number of problems, most of which can be solved by either cooking the eggs in 180-190F water, or steaming them.

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Response to LSFL (Original post)

Sat Jun 17, 2017, 06:24 AM

7. I put fresh eggs in cold water, bring to a boil, simmer for 15 minutes, chill and peel.

They always come out perfect.

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Response to LSFL (Original post)

Sat Jun 17, 2017, 09:03 AM

8. I find that two week old eggs peel better, but....

I might try some of the above methods......

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Response to LSFL (Original post)

Sat Jun 17, 2017, 11:16 AM

10. Best method I've found and I use it 3-4 times z week.

Put 1/2 inch water in a pan with a tight fitting lid. Bring to boil. Gently add (aged) eggs, cover and time for 10 minutes. Cool under running water.

Makes no difference how many eggs, one or a dozen, water boils fast and you can tweek time by 30 seconds for personal taste.
This is the DU member formerly known as flamin lib.

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Response to LSFL (Original post)

Sun Jun 18, 2017, 06:35 AM

14. I steam my eggs.

Age of eggs doesn't seem to affect the results. And the yokes are always a wonderful pale yellow, no green rings.

How to Steam Eggs
Add 1 inch of water to large pot. Place steamer insert inside, cover, and bring to a boil over high heat. (I actually put the eggs in the steamer insert right away) Add eggs to steamer basket, cover, and continue cooking, 6 minutes for soft-boiled eggs or 12 minutes for hard-boiled. Serve immediately if serving hot.

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Response to LSFL (Original post)

Sun Jun 18, 2017, 04:20 PM

16. You can waste a lot of water when running the tap open for 5 or more minutes...

a water saving note.

I do NOT run them under cold water for any length of time at all. I have lots of ice in the feezer so I pile the ice on, over top of the eggs. The ice melts fairly slowly and cools the eggs quickly.
You can waste a LOT of water by running a tap for 5 minutes or more.

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Response to LSFL (Original post)

Fri Aug 25, 2017, 06:45 PM

20. I use the steaming method now

Works great!! Use my stainless veggie steamer in wide low pot.

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Response to LSFL (Original post)

Fri Aug 25, 2017, 07:18 PM

21. do you have any tips for boiling just one or two eggs?

mine are always hit and miss

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