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Thu Jan 2, 2020, 02:54 PM

Baking sourdough bread today

I made rolls for Christmas and used some of the dough for starter. I don't usually do it that way, but figured what the heck. Not sure how the dough will age with milk and butter in it, but we'll see. Looks good, rising and baking nice.

Happy New Year!

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Reply Baking sourdough bread today (Original post)
Marthe48 Jan 2020 OP
getagrip_already Jan 2020 #1
Marthe48 Jan 2020 #2
getagrip_already Jan 2020 #3
Marthe48 Jan 2020 #4

Response to Marthe48 (Original post)

Thu Jan 2, 2020, 03:11 PM

1. I made some new years eve....

I use a natural starter though, and it's a 2 process to make and rise the dough. It's taken me a long time to get it even approaching correctly risen using just starter, but it's finally good.

May make some more this weekend. Especially if the storm arrives as expected.

Something about a snowstorm and the smell of freshly baking bread......

Enjoy your yeastie goodnes!

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Response to getagrip_already (Reply #1)

Thu Jan 2, 2020, 03:21 PM

2. I tried to make salt rising dough years ago

but it didn't work. I use packaged yeast to make bread and rolls. Maybe my kitchen is harboring more wild yeast than it did before

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Response to Marthe48 (Reply #2)

Thu Jan 2, 2020, 03:30 PM

3. you can buy (or be gifted) some starter and then just keep it alive.....

But really all it takes is some fresh whole wheat flour that hasn't been treated. Even some wheat from a whole food type market crushed up and put into a flour and water solution will work.

The key is to continuously throw away half your starter. Seems wasteful, but it isn't if you are dealing with a quarter cup of slurry. Each day, just take half and throw it away, then add 1/8 cup of fresh flour and a 1/8 cup of warm water. mix and keep warm.

After w few days you should start to notice bubbles forming. At that point don't throw any out, but add 1/4 cup flour and water. Then a 1/2 cup and so on until you are up to about 2 or 3 cups.

At that point, use a cup for starter, and feed a cup of water and flour back. Then refrigerate. When you want to bake again, just let it warm up, then add a cup of water and water, wait a day, and take the cup of starter out to use.

The initial wild yeasts come from the flour you use to feed it, not your kitchen. Over time your kitchen yeasts will join the party and the flavor profile will alter slightly.

It's all good. Just don't use chlorinated water.

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Response to getagrip_already (Reply #3)

Thu Jan 2, 2020, 04:11 PM

4. Thanks for the guidelines!

If I can find another jar, I might try that out. I met an exchange student from Ghana years ago and she wanted to bake bread, from a starter. I helped her get a starter put together and she baked bread at her host family's hose the rest of the year. We joked about feeding it

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