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Thu Dec 21, 2017, 03:45 PM

Binge Eating? Articles say the only way to overcome it is to see a doctor, etc. That

is not feasible at this time.

Any tips for overcoming this. Literature says it is the most reported eating disorder in the USA.

I have not done this all my life and cannot figure out why or how I started. I have finally figured out that just one of the main culprits for me is laying down to watch tv - it is a big trigger. But knowing it is not stopping it.

The minute I get through eating a meal, I suddenly want something sweet. Then a sweet turns to a dozen candy bars.

I'm trying to think it through.. Any help will be GREATLY appreciated.

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Arrow 19 replies Author Time Post
Reply Binge Eating? Articles say the only way to overcome it is to see a doctor, etc. That (Original post)
patricia92243 Dec 2017 OP
janterry Dec 2017 #1
Sanity Claws Dec 2017 #4
wryter2000 Dec 2017 #6
patricia92243 Jan 2018 #12
Phoenix61 Dec 2017 #2
Stuart G Jun 1 #18
flor-de-jasmim Dec 2017 #3
greymattermom Dec 2017 #5
TygrBright Dec 2017 #7
patricia92243 Jan 2018 #14
TygrBright Jan 2018 #16
applegrove Dec 2017 #8
unc70 Dec 2017 #9
patricia92243 Jan 2018 #11
ProudMNDemocrat Dec 2017 #10
patricia92243 Jan 2018 #13
ProudMNDemocrat Jan 2018 #15
Stuart G Jun 1 #17
patricia92243 Jun 1 #19

Response to patricia92243 (Original post)

Thu Dec 21, 2017, 03:49 PM

1. You don't need an MD

that's silly.

But what I do is not buy the offending thing at all. When I have a craving, I buy a small bag of chips at the market and eat it (I like salty things). I never buy big bags and bring them home.

If they aren't here, I don't eat them .

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Response to janterry (Reply #1)

Thu Dec 21, 2017, 03:56 PM

4. I agree with this

If it's not in the house, you can't binge eat it.

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Response to Sanity Claws (Reply #4)

Thu Dec 21, 2017, 04:02 PM

6. That's how I handle it

I cannot have potato chips or fritos in the house. Sweets aren't my problem. Crunchy, salty, oily is.

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Response to Sanity Claws (Reply #4)

Fri Jan 12, 2018, 09:49 AM

12. I agree BUT - if there is nothing to binge on - I don't think twice about

going to the store and buying two packs of Hershey's, huge bag of M&M's, Butter Fingers, etc. This is all in ONE shopping trip.

In another post, I have found a self-hypnosis tape that is really helping me.

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Response to patricia92243 (Original post)

Thu Dec 21, 2017, 03:53 PM

2. I have a massive sweet tooth

and no where near the self control I would like. I've learned to not bring certain items into the house. It doesn't matter how many servings the package says there are. Once I open it, there's always just one. I've found frozen grapes to be helpful. They are sweet, crunchy, cold... kind of like little bites of sorbet in its own wrapper.

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Response to Phoenix61 (Reply #2)

Fri Jun 1, 2018, 07:20 PM

18. Yep, that is part of the solution..."...not to bring certain items into the house.."

If it is not in the house..and you are "staying in the house"...then you cannot eat it. You will eat something else that is in the house..

No it isn't that simple. Don't ever buy it..or even pick up the package at the grocery store. Frozen grapes are a great idea. Thank you for that idea....

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Response to patricia92243 (Original post)

Thu Dec 21, 2017, 03:54 PM

3. When I acknowledge to myself that really I don't need more,

I pour either salt or artificial sugar on the rest of the food so it is inedible.
Good luck!

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Response to patricia92243 (Original post)

Thu Dec 21, 2017, 03:57 PM

5. Sometimes it's just chewing and swallowing.

Eat a giant plate of celery, broccoli, etc. and drink a huge glass of water.

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Response to patricia92243 (Original post)

Thu Dec 21, 2017, 04:09 PM

7. A few things that have helped me.

Although they're not "instant fixes", and they take quite a while of regular practice, to have real effect.

But they HAVE helped:

1. Get your sleep cycle in order, even if it means sacrificing morning/evening routines to do so. There are many resources online that can help you identify things that interfere with a productive sleep cycle.

2. HYDRATE properly. Hydrate well and conscientiously. Plain water, a 12-oz glass first thing in the morning. Another glass *before* every meal.

3. Cut out artificial sweeteners and 'non-fat' foods that contain fake fats like Olestra and certain types of fillers, etc. Get rid of the ones in your cupboard and refrigerator, and don't buy more.

4. Move around during the day- add a small increment more to your 'movement quotient' every week or two. Don't embark on a big, ambitious exercise agenda, just move around a bit more. Add a little stretching or yoga to your morning routine. Take the stairs instead of the escalator/elevator. Walk around the block in the late afternoon.

5. Do things that help counter 'mid-winter mood drop' - like spending time with a light box, using a little aromatherapy (cheerful scents like peppermint, orange, etc.)

Doing that stuff will not stop the bingeing in its tracks, but it should help over time.

I also learned the trick of when I start eating something I'm vulnerable to bingeing on, I measure out a small portion and put the rest away. When the portion's gone, I take FIVE slow, relaxing breaths, get up and do some small activity (wash a dish, put something away, etc.) and THEN, if I'm still craving, repeat that process- measure it out, consume, breathe, pause.

It's really hard to train your brain to interrupt the bingeing, but there are some cognitive behavioral scripts and tools that may be helpful, as a next step. Find a therapist who does CBT in relation to compulsive behaviors and set up a 6-8 week course of treatment, if you have that option.

But try the other stuff, first.

helpfully,
Bright

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Response to TygrBright (Reply #7)

Fri Jan 12, 2018, 09:59 AM

14. Very, very helpful post. I'm working on my sleep cycle with terrific results.

I walk (slowly, I'm old.) My uncle who I walked with nearly everyday died and also I have moved to a very small town in another state and find it hard to find anywhere to walk other than my own neighborhood.

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Response to patricia92243 (Reply #14)

Fri Jan 12, 2018, 03:33 PM

16. I live in a development, on what they call a "loop".

Which is more or less just what it sounds like- an oval-shaped street configuration. About 8-9 houses up and down the outsides of the long sides of the loop, 5-6 up and down the short side. There's a sidewalk along the outside, and in the afternoon when I get a terrible nap attack, instead of taking a snooze (which often disrupts my sleep cycle) I put on a jacket and do 2-3 circuits of the oval.

If you live on a regular grid-type street, once around the block would probably have the same effect.

It's not as inspiring as going to the park and doing the walking trails. But I've come to know some of the neighbors and their kids, at least to say "hi!" to, and I'm now at the point where I can tell when some of the neighbors' flowering shrubs are about to set buds, when to look for bulbs pushing up, etc.

It's very helpful.

As we get older the sleep cycle does change. But paying attention and adapting to it can still keep the body in balance.

encouragingly,
Bright

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Response to patricia92243 (Original post)

Thu Dec 21, 2017, 04:28 PM

8. My sister and her family are totally off manufactured sugar. She said it took

Last edited Thu Dec 21, 2017, 05:14 PM - Edit history (1)

a few weeks to aclimatize but now a fresh raspberry tastes like the most wonderful fresh raspberry flavour you can imagine. You taste buds will adjust to liking fruit instead of candy bars.

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Response to patricia92243 (Original post)

Thu Dec 21, 2017, 04:41 PM

9. Do not lie down to watch TV

You say that is your big trigger to start eating. Then try not to lie down. Change your seating. Move your furniture around. Do anything that can break the cycle. Maybe change when, where, and how you watch TV. Use DVR on on demand to make things seem different.

Good luck.

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Response to unc70 (Reply #9)

Fri Jan 12, 2018, 09:43 AM

11. I lie down to watch tv because my husband is in the living room

watching stuff that I don't want to see (such as Fox news.)

Since posting this, I have come across a self-hypnosis tape that is really helping me to not eat between meals including when I lie down.

I am on my 7th day of not eating between meals.

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Response to patricia92243 (Original post)

Sat Dec 30, 2017, 07:50 PM

10. What is the quality of your lifestyle and meals??????

Binge eating has a lot to do with lifestyle habits and meal planning.

Too many people I know who happen to be heavier than they would like, tend to eat poorly. They eat on the run, grab something at Taco Bell without knowing what is in their food that affect them so. Granted, many do not make the time to plan out their day because they lead hectic lives. Over time, overall health goes to pot and guilt takes over. Thus the trap of binge eating because a meal or two was skipped.

Talking with one's Doctor, working with a Nutritionist, attending support groups, Weight Watchers, can help may people learn healthier habits to live a more healthful life. All it takes is a decision to do it. For the way to conquer fear is with action.

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Response to ProudMNDemocrat (Reply #10)

Fri Jan 12, 2018, 09:53 AM

13. retired - so no hurrying. But only activity disabled husband can do is

eating in various restaurants. I don't think this will be too much of a problem - when I finally get eating (constantly) between meals solved.

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Response to patricia92243 (Reply #13)

Fri Jan 12, 2018, 10:20 AM

15. Quality Protien, Fruits, and Vegetables.....



I understand how you feel. I felt the same way when I weighed much heavier. But I found that by going back to Weight Watchers, I found that with Protien, Fruits, and Vegetables, I ate better and did not eat much in between meals. The many balanced recipies proved to be filling, tasty, and less likely to want to crave something else. I also had to retrain my brain. Also I can enjoy things in moderation like wine, beer, a dessert , etc.

Even at 65, this old dog learned new tricks.

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Response to patricia92243 (Original post)

Fri Jun 1, 2018, 07:16 PM

17. Binge Eating?...You are not alone..After getting on a diet, and seeing a doctor..then

try...Overeaters Anonymous. At these meetings you will meet other Binge Eaters who have overcome this problem. It isn't easy, but you need every tool available to overcome this. OA is just one of the tools, that include a diet, regular eating. eating the best foods, and avoiding certain "binge foods"..For some people it one food, and for some it is another. OA originally named certain foods to avoid. Like "sugar". Now it is up to the individual to work on the foods that are binged on. To add one more idea..It isn't easy to avoid binge foods..especially those we like/love to eat. Use every trick available to deal with this. Much has been written, and there are many books dealing with this.
...Oh..about Overeaters Anonymous..I started going in 1980. After a couple of years, I lost about 50 pounds and have kept it off for over 35 years...Good luck in whatever you do. And please, don't give up..!!!


Stuart...

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Response to Stuart G (Reply #17)

Fri Jun 1, 2018, 08:29 PM

19. Kept weight off for 35 years - Wonderful!!!

We don't have OA in my small town but I may get some books about them. Thanks.

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