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Sat Mar 10, 2018, 01:19 PM

Hi folks, Im new. My young adult son is having a rough go. How do you get off SSRIs?

Heís just been diagnosed a month ago and started Lexapro. In the last week the light has gone out of his eyes, no eye contact, and anger all the time for nothing. I feel like Iím losing my son.

He wouldnít go to a GP, wouldnít go for walks or outside to get some light and air, basically didnít leave the house but for two evening appointments a week. Iím thankful for them.

Inside, he is the most lovely kind gentleman.

Do we come back from depression?

If he wonít do the things that help everyone but will take the pills, and the pills appear to be making his personality change in a not good way, what next?

The other day he told me he thinks my intentions may not be good. That Iím trying to harm him by asking him to go to the GP, get excercise, clean his room.

Iím reeling from all of this.

Thanks.

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Reply Hi folks, Im new. My young adult son is having a rough go. How do you get off SSRIs? (Original post)
mahina Mar 2018 OP
chuckstevens Mar 2018 #1
mahina Mar 2018 #10
steve2470 Mar 2018 #13
elleng Mar 2018 #2
mahina Mar 2018 #11
tomp Mar 2018 #3
mahina Mar 2018 #12
Louis1895 Mar 2018 #4
RainCaster Mar 2018 #5
marylandblue Mar 2018 #6
enough Mar 2018 #7
MFM008 Mar 2018 #8
safeinOhio Mar 2018 #9
appalachiablue Mar 2018 #14
whathehell Mar 2018 #15
mahina May 2019 #21
whathehell May 2019 #23
MFM008 Jun 2018 #16
irisblue Jun 2018 #17
mahina May 2019 #20
get the red out Jun 2018 #18
mahina May 2019 #22
pnwmom Jul 2018 #19

Response to mahina (Original post)

Sat Mar 10, 2018, 01:27 PM

1. Very sorry!

 

Whatever anti-Depressant one is on, you have to tapper down slowly and not go cold turkey.

Is there anyone besides yourself he would listen to?

It usually takes a combination of an anti-Depressan and therapy; the most success comes when they go hand in hand.

Some believe depression and anxiety's root cause is anger, but I am not a doctor.

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Response to chuckstevens (Reply #1)

Sat Mar 10, 2018, 04:03 PM

10. I wish because it stresses him to even talk to me now

Wishing for someone else for him to talk to very much.

I am grateful for your response. Thank you.

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Response to chuckstevens (Reply #1)

Sat Mar 10, 2018, 04:40 PM

13. With all due respect, you had me 100% until...

you mentioned the repressed anger theory, which comes from Sigmund Freud and was discarded for lack of convincing evidence decades ago. Legitimately diagnosed Major Depressive Disorder is a biochemical disorder of the brain, which can be triggered by excessive stress. Can some people with MDD have anger-related issues already? Of course, but they don't cause the MDD.

The young man needs to see a competent psychiatrist, from what I'm reading.

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Response to mahina (Original post)

Sat Mar 10, 2018, 01:31 PM

2. If just diagnosed, and new RX, sounds like a different medicine might be better.

Check back with the Doc.

Coming back from depression is possible, but not easy. Many here can discuss it.

Good luck.

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Response to elleng (Reply #2)

Sat Mar 10, 2018, 04:03 PM

11. Thank you elleng

Aloha no.

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Response to mahina (Original post)

Sat Mar 10, 2018, 01:32 PM

3. Have you spoken to the doctor who put him on the Lexapro?

 

That person should be monitoring the effects of the medication. One month is about the time for normal follow up. If that person is not a psychiatrist, I strongly recommend you get your son to see one.

P.S.: it is not typical for Lexapro to change one's personality. For the record, "personality" is, by definition, extremely hard to change. You may be seeing additional signs of depression not yet alleviated by the medication, or possibly adverse effects of the medication.

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Response to tomp (Reply #3)

Sat Mar 10, 2018, 04:06 PM

12. Todays the first follow up.

I wonít know what happens.

Heís my heart, i raised him on my own.
Thank you for message.

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Response to mahina (Original post)

Sat Mar 10, 2018, 01:39 PM

4. He needs to see a psychiatrist not a GP

Psychiatrists are specially trained in diseases of the mind.

There are lots and lots of drugs out there but treatment should be carefully monitored. Do not stop taking meds without medical supervision. I know of many cases where it took several tries to find the right medications.

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Response to mahina (Original post)

Sat Mar 10, 2018, 01:51 PM

5. You don't go off them, you find the right one

As others have said, try again. When he finds the right one, you will see his old personality reappear. In my case it took over a year to find the right one and the right dosage. That was many years ago and my life has been so much better.

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Response to mahina (Original post)

Sat Mar 10, 2018, 02:13 PM

6. Definitely go to a psychiatrist

Paranoia could be a side effect of the medication. Could also be a sign he has bipolar rather than depression. In either case, things can change quickly. Keep a close eye on him and find a specialist right away. If things continue to worsen and you cqn't get him to a psychiatrist, you might need to take him to the emergency room.

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Response to mahina (Original post)

Sat Mar 10, 2018, 02:32 PM

7. Was the original diagnosis and prescription done by the GP or a psychiatrist?

I will echo the advice of others that he needs to be evaluated by a psychiatrist soon, both about the diagnosis and the medication.

But I do know that it can be hard to get young adults to be willing to get help. It can be a long process. And I know from experience that it can really rock your world in a terrifying way. It can get better though.

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Response to mahina (Original post)

Sat Mar 10, 2018, 02:39 PM

8. Very slowly

I've been on zoloft since 1999.
I went off it once to quickly and it caused a major depressive episode.
Make sure coming off of it is to get on something else it sounds like that's what he needs,
it sounds like he's having an episode like my son had but remember it takes a while to build up in your system a minimum of 6 weeks,
so if he's still angry and acting out it may not be in his system yet there isn't an antidepressant that acts overnight unfortunately.
Meds has worked for me pretty well over the years see if you can get him to hang in there.
Good luck.

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Response to mahina (Original post)

Sat Mar 10, 2018, 03:43 PM

9. I suffered a major depression in 1990

and it took me lots of learning to find my way. Went back to college in my mid 40s and got a degree in psych. Had a great psychiatrist that put me in touch we a Behavioral psychologist and that helped more than anything. Once you have been through all history once or twice there seems less need to keep doing that. The behavioralist will give you small, concert steps. For me it was those small things put together. Like making my bed the first thing every morning, long walks leading to more exercise. Getting out of the house and socializing with others with similar interest. Take a class, do yoga etc.

It takes a lot of time and work, but well worth it.

Personally I feel short term drug therapy and not long term.

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Response to mahina (Original post)

Sat Mar 10, 2018, 05:32 PM

14. He needs to see a good Psychiatrist MD right away, don't delay.

SSRI medications like Lexapro, Zoloft, Prozac, etc. are helpful for many people. BUT for others they can cause or exacerbate negative and sometimes harmful behavior which slowly appears, or more suddenly arises especially in the earlier weeks/months of taking meds.

Do a little basic research by googling "SSRI drugs and side effects." Studies in Germany in the 1980s showed that some young people in particular, who took certain SSRI drugs became aggressive, hostile and experienced suicidal ideation. Very problematic issues.
Other research reports have come out showing how negative side effects can also occur sometimes in ADULTS, not just juveniles. In the UK, Paxil was banned or restricted like another similar drug (Celexa?) I believe. A friend of ours went through this and it was a mess for a while, until she got to a good doctor and on a healthy course.

Since 1990s SSRI meds were tremendously popular and overprescribed, for anxiety and depression to nail baiting, eating disorders, you name it. A lot of money was made off them, and sometimes they caused problems, bad outcomes. Yet for many people the meds were, and are beneficial. During the 'Prozac Nation' years, stressed out teenagers, post-Iraq Vets and many other people were often started on meds without serious, professional evaluation and MDs requiring regular medication checks and monitoring visits every few months which are critical.
Not trying to scare but inform you, like other posters who've stressed the importance and urgency of having your son consult a MI medical expert, not a General Doctor.

Also I'm NOT anti-medication. You said your son is going off Lexapro after recently starting it. The behavior you're describing, notably the 'personality change' and resistance, and the symptoms and diagnosis that initially warranted medication definitely must be evaluated and regularly overseen by a very competent psychiatrist/medical expert. *Mention family history, substance abuse, any other medical conditions and ALL medications taken, including OTC (over-the-counter) products like decongestants, supplements, etc. It's important because some people are sensitive to drugs of all kinds, especially if mixed together or combined with other substances.

That your son is a kind, lovely man I'm sure. A neighbor with a different condition is like that- sweetest guy, kind and giving to all, and much loved. Aloha, all the best to you & your son, help is out there!

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Response to mahina (Original post)

Tue Mar 13, 2018, 08:45 AM

15. We absolutely do come back from Depression...

Depression has been called the "common cold of mental illness".

I experienced Major Clinical Depression in my early 20's and, with the the right antidepressants and talk therapy, recovered completely....With adequate treatment, your son should do the same -- Wishing you both the best.

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Response to whathehell (Reply #15)

Sun May 12, 2019, 10:04 PM

21. Mahalo whatthehell. Holding hope.

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Response to mahina (Reply #21)

Mon May 13, 2019, 06:09 PM

23. Absolutely, mahina.

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Response to mahina (Original post)

Sat Jun 23, 2018, 06:29 AM

16. VERY SLOWLY

I tried to get off Zoloft to fast, caused a rebound effect.

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Response to mahina (Original post)

Sat Jun 23, 2018, 12:33 PM

17. How is he doing mahina?

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Response to irisblue (Reply #17)

Sun May 12, 2019, 10:02 PM

20. It's been quite a process

He is much better though! The light is back in his eyes and he has responsibilities which he manages. Thank you irisblue.

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Response to mahina (Original post)

Thu Jun 28, 2018, 08:18 AM

18. There are many medications

I have had to change twice in the past year after one stopped working for me after 7 years. A person just has to hang on and make clear to their mental health professional that the medication they are on is not working and they need to change! Sometimes you have to be adamant.

Maybe just only ask him to do one thing right now, go to his Doctor, until after he sees his doctor. My first instinct is to huddle up and do nothing when my mental health is suffering, I sometimes simply can't do anything useful. One thing at a time. I would suggest telling him that things can get a lot better if he sees his Dr and gets a medication change. I can't tell you how much more my current medication is helping me than the last two, unfortunately it took some trial and error to get to this place, but that's part of the deal, unfortunately.

This is very hard, thoughts for you and your son. You are an angel for helping him work to get through depression, back in my day my folks just told me to snap out of it and that they didn't want to hear it. I am sure I have suffered from depression since at least age 12, when I vividly remember all joy suddenly disappearing with a dead feeling in its place. Your support will make a huge positive difference in your son's life, he's lucky to have you.

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Response to get the red out (Reply #18)

Sun May 12, 2019, 10:05 PM

22. Aloha get the red out. Thank you.

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Response to mahina (Original post)

Thu Jul 19, 2018, 07:09 PM

19. It takes a few weeks for the SSRI to kick in, and the dose often needs to be raised.

Is he taking a full, effective dose?

Once you are on them, the trick is to go off them very slowly and gradually -- much more slowly than the common recs say.

The other possibility is that he has something beyond simple depression. One of our relatives turned out to be bipolar, and the medication for depression just made things worse. He needed lithium.

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