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Sat May 8, 2021, 07:30 PM

What Going for a 1-Mile Run Does to Your Body, Says Science

https://www.eatthis.com/what-happens-to-your-body-one-mile-run/

It's no surprise that exercise is good for you. But when we say "good for you," what exactly do we mean? From speeding up your heart rate to lowering your stress to improving your sleep, even a modest exercise—like, say, a single one-mile run—can lead to a range of health benefits that make it worth incorporating into your daily routine. But don't listen to me. Listen to the science: Numerous studies and researchers have examined the various health effects of running a mile and have noted a wide range of positive side effects, many of which will surprise you. Read on for more, and for more on the science of running, don't miss the Side Effects of Running Every Day, According to Science.

I usually run 8-12 miles per week. Not fast, but steady. I'm 71 and smoked for almost 40 years. In November I got a pacemaker and that hasn't slowed me down a bit. I think it has really helped. After a few laps, I'm in the zone, headphones keep me in a mediative state of mind.

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Response to multigraincracker (Original post)

Sat May 8, 2021, 07:34 PM

1. Thanks. We've been daily joggers for 40 years.

Even in our late 70's we still do almost 4 miles a day, 5 days a week.
Doing good so far...slow but sure.

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Response to multigraincracker (Original post)

Sat May 8, 2021, 09:07 PM

2. I just finished a 7.3 (walk/jog). 61 down about 30lbs since February.

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Response to multigraincracker (Original post)

Sat May 8, 2021, 09:42 PM

3. Phhhhhhtttt..... what good is a mere 4 minutes of exercise?



Actually.... I've been doing an exercise bike because it's a lot less stressful on my bum knee and back. I'm doing 45 minutes at a very brisk pace each and every day, which combined with not eating stupidly anymore has allowed me to drop 40 pounds in 5 months.

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Response to groundloop (Reply #3)

Sat May 8, 2021, 10:07 PM

5. can i borrow your exercise bike? nt

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Response to multigraincracker (Original post)

Sat May 8, 2021, 09:44 PM

4. If you aren't into running, 20 minute walks do great things to your health too!

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Response to multigraincracker (Original post)

Sat May 8, 2021, 10:17 PM

6. if i started running i'd probably sprain an ankle. lol but true. nt

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Response to multigraincracker (Original post)

Sat May 8, 2021, 10:19 PM

7. Wow, runners have better kness than nonrunners. That surprised me.

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Response to Native (Reply #7)

Sat May 8, 2021, 11:25 PM

11. Actually, it shouldn't. Those with bad knees can't run; those with functional knees can and often do

With my funky knees, running would be excruciating. So I hike.

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Response to wackadoo wabbit (Reply #11)

Sun May 9, 2021, 11:23 AM

12. I didn't state that very well. Here's the excerpt...

This one might also surprise you, especially if you've heard that running can be tough on your knees. But according to Todd Buckingham, exercise physiologist at the Mary Free Bed Sports Rehabilitation Performance Lab, the assertion that running is bad for your joints "is a complete myth. In fact, runners have healthier knees than non-runners," he says.

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Response to multigraincracker (Original post)

Sat May 8, 2021, 10:24 PM

8. Damn, you are inspiring

Pacemaker/defib heart failure at 80 . Going to try to walk and do more, but it is just so tiring.

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Response to multigraincracker (Original post)

Sat May 8, 2021, 10:29 PM

9. After a Staph A infection led to two replacement valves, and a chunk of the heart muscle,

it took me ages to get to any semblance of conditioning. 3 weeks before I could walk to the corner and back. I knew I was never going to be athletic again, but at 67, both my cardiologist and my GP were pleased with my effort and my results.

Then, last spring, I was doing one of my normal routes, and I just ran out of gas early on. I couldn't believe it, but I cut it off short and headed home. On the way home, it hit me. "Is this COVID???"

Well, it got somewhat better, so I knew it wasn't that, but then it got worse again. I had all kinds of medical stuff going on at the time - surgery on both eyes and an upcoming colonoscopy, after which I was resolved to get to the bottom of this. I couldn't do anything even close to what I had been doing, in either distance or intensity.

During the colonoscopy, it came to light - pulse rate was between 28 and 32. Turns out, either the infection or the surgery had damaged the electrical connection, and I needed a pacemaker. I fully expected it was going to jumpstart me, but it never happened.

I now do what used to be my "resting" day - a kilometer at a fairly relaxed pace, my "stress" day being something over 3km in around 40 minutes. Hardly competitive, but not bad for an old guy.

Not any more.

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Response to multigraincracker (Original post)

Sat May 8, 2021, 10:29 PM

10. 66, a runner since HS. Age has slowed my pace and distance but I still pound the miles.

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