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Wed Aug 19, 2015, 05:50 PM

question. my hubby has filed for his ssdi, but

He's working part time right now (he worked in construction, but is now janitorial) but its becoming increasingly difficult for him to work at all. He does it to help support us, and because he needs to get out in the world while he can. As soon as he's approved, he'll quit. How will they calculate the amount? If they take his income into account, will or can they adjust it?

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Reply question. my hubby has filed for his ssdi, but (Original post)
Saphire Aug 2015 OP
LeftofObama Aug 2015 #1
TexasTowelie Aug 2015 #2
SheilaT Aug 2015 #3
mackerel Aug 2015 #4

Response to Saphire (Original post)

Wed Aug 19, 2015, 06:02 PM

1. I found this online...

http://www.disabilitysecrets.com/how-much-in-ssd.html

Calculating Your Social Security Disability Payment

The amount of money you will receive from Social Security on a monthly basis is unique for every individual. This is due to the fact that the Social Security Administration (SSA) uses a complex weighted formula in order to calculate benefits for each person, up to the maximum benefit of $2,663 (in 2015).

Social Security bases your retirement and disability benefits on the amount of income on which you've paid Social Security taxes—called "covered earnings." Your average covered earnings over a period of years is known as your average indexed monthly earnings (AIME). A formula is applied to your AIME to calculate your primary insurance amount (PIA)—the base figure the SSA uses in setting your benefit amount. The formula consists of fixed percentages of different amounts of income (called "bend points," which are adjusted each year). For example, in 2011, 90% of the first $749 of your AIME was added to your PIA, plus 32% of your AIME from $749 to $4,517, plus 15% of your AIME over $4,517. The amounts are added up to come up with your PIA.

To see your entire covered earnings history, you can check your annual Social Security Statement. Social Security sends out printed statements every five years to those not receving benefits, and every year to those over 60. You can also check your statement online at www.ssa.gov/mystatement/. (If you want to enter salary information yourself rather than rely on your earnings record and Social Security's estimate of your future earnings, you can use the SSA's online benefits calculator at www.socialsecurity.gov/planners/benefitcalculators.htm.) You can also call your local Social Security office and a field representative will be able to help you estimate what your benefits would be.



I hope it helps.

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Response to Saphire (Original post)

Wed Aug 19, 2015, 06:11 PM

2. If he works 20 hours a week or more

then he will not be eligible for disability.

He can make up to $795 a month with no changes in the SSDI check. If his income is between $790 and $1,095 a month then there will be a reduction in his SSDI. If he earns more than $1,095 a month then he is considered gainfully employed and will not receive disability.

His SSDI amount is based upon his total lifetime income that was reported to the Social Security Administration.

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Response to Saphire (Original post)

Thu Aug 20, 2015, 12:37 AM

3. What the first two posters said.

 

One of the biggest drawbacks to SSDI is that because you leave the workforce before (and sometimes long before) you'd actually qualify for regular Social Security, the amount you'll get generally isn't very much.

If it is at all possible to transition to a less physical job, he'd be better off. Please do not take that comment as a callous, "He can work" statement, but rather as a pragmatic one.

Whatever happens, I wish you the best.

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Response to Saphire (Original post)

Sat Aug 22, 2015, 12:28 AM

4. What are the particulars of his application? If he is not 67 or older and he is working or GSA he

will more than likely get denied and he'll have to request a hearing.

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