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Sun Sep 30, 2018, 08:45 PM

Beginning to cut WAY back on grocery budget.

Last edited Sun Sep 30, 2018, 10:46 PM - Edit history (2)

It makes sense to me to change the family's ways now while food is still relatively affordable.

I really loved Leanne Brown's book Good and Cheap - Eat Well on 4 Dollars a Day. It was a little bit on the optimistic side about fresh produce, I thought. I still enjoyed it.

One thing she recommends is buying artisanal bread after it has been reduced in price. But I found it's so much better to do it yourself!
Super fresh, super easy and super cheap. Just google "New York Times No-Knead Bread". I use an adaptation of the foodandwine.com instructions:

For a 1.5 pound loaf I use
3 cups of unbleached all purpose flour
1 1/2 cups of lukewarm water
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 teaspoon fast rise yeast

Step 1
Combine the flour, yeast, and salt in a large bowl. Add 1.5 cups room temp water and stir until blended. Youíll have a shaggy, sticky dough; flick some water drops if all the flour does not incorporate. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap (I use a lid) and let the dough rest for about 18 hours at room temperature (a couple of hours less if your kitchen is warmer; a couple more if itís cool) My house is around 70 and it takes around 12-15. The dough is ready when its surface is dotted with bubbles.

Step 2
Flour a work surface, transfer the dough to it, and fold it once or twice; it will be soft but not terribly sticky once dusted with flour. Cover loosely with plastic wrap (I use a floured towel) and let rest for about 15 minutes.

Step 3
Using just enough additional flour to keep the dough from sticking, gently and quickly shape the dough into a ball. Generously coat a cotton (not terry cloth) kitchen towel with cornmeal, semolina, or wheat bran (or use a silicone baking mat); put the dough seam side down on the towel and dust with more flour or cornmeal. Cover with another cotton towel (or plastic wrap) and let rise for about 2 hours. When itís ready, the dough will be more than doubled in size and wonít spring back readily when poked with your finger.

(I put a length of parchment paper inside the cleaned mixing bowl and let the bread rise in that. Then I can just lift the bread using the parchment paper as a sling. This works better for me.)

Step 4
At least a half hour before the dough is ready, heat the oven to 450įF. Put a 3- to 4-quart covered pot (with the cover) ó it may be cast iron, enamel, Pyrex, or ceramic ó in the oven as it heats. When the dough is ready, carefully remove the pot from the oven and turn the dough over into the pot, seam side up. (See illustration, next page: Slide your hand under the towel and just turn the dough over into the pot; itís messy, and it probably wonít fall in artfully, but it will straighten out as it bakes.) Cover with the lid and bake for 30 minutes, then remove the lid and bake for another 15 minutes, until the loaf is beautifully browned; the breadís internal temperature should be 200įF or more. (If at any point the dough starts to smell scorched, lower the heat a bit.) Remove the bread with a spatula or tongs and cool on a rack for at least 30 minutes before slicing. I wait at least 45 minutes.

(Again I use parchment. After the initial 30 minutes I use oven mitts and lift the lid. Remove the bread using the parchment as a sling, discard the parchment and pot the bread back into the pot for another 15 minutes. This will turn it lovely and brown.

Notes
Faster No-Knead Bread: Reduce the initial rise to 8 hours; skip the 15-minute resting period in Step 2 and then shape the dough in Step 3. Proceed immediately to Step 4.

Whole Wheat No-Knead Bread: Substitute whole wheat flour for up to 2 cups of the all-purpose flour. You wonít get quite as much rise, and the bread will be slightly denser but full flavored.

If at any point you want to stop the rise, pop the dough in the refrigerator.




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Reply Beginning to cut WAY back on grocery budget. (Original post)
violetpastille Sep 2018 OP
SWBTATTReg Sep 2018 #1
violetpastille Sep 2018 #2
fierywoman Sep 2018 #3
fierywoman Sep 2018 #4
violetpastille Sep 2018 #7
dembotoz Sep 2018 #5
violetpastille Oct 2018 #9
Turbineguy Sep 2018 #6
safeinOhio Oct 2018 #8

Response to violetpastille (Original post)

Sun Sep 30, 2018, 08:57 PM

1. Thanks. Sounds pretty good to me. Look forward to making. There's nothing like fresh, homemade...

bread out of the oven...my nose is already working overtime in anticipation!

Thanks so much for this recipe. I'll let you know how it comes out.

Take care!

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Response to SWBTATTReg (Reply #1)

Sun Sep 30, 2018, 09:25 PM

2. Just 1/2 tsp of salt

I went back and edited!

It is so easy, but the results are really restaurant quality. Excellent chewy crust and tender crumb.

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Response to violetpastille (Original post)

Sun Sep 30, 2018, 09:35 PM

3. If you grind about 1/4 to 1/3 cup oatmeal and sub it for the amount of flour

you'll get a dough with a nice "chew."

You're SO right about how much better homemade bread tastes than "artisan" -- and it's SO much cheaper!

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Response to violetpastille (Original post)

Sun Sep 30, 2018, 09:37 PM

4. And if you want a crispy crust, boil about a quart of water just as you're about to

bake it, and pour it into a pan which you've placed on the bottom of the oven or on a rack underneath the rack the bread is baking on.

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Response to fierywoman (Reply #4)

Sun Sep 30, 2018, 10:42 PM

7. With this one you don't have to have a steam tray. It's kind of magical.

The water in the dough plus cooking in the pot makes its own steam.

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Response to violetpastille (Original post)

Sun Sep 30, 2018, 10:11 PM

5. time to crank up the bread machine

i know that makes me a philistine but i do not have the room or patience to do that bread.

i stopped baking much in the summer...too damn hot in the kitchen and stuff got moldy too fast.

time to get that thing going again.

i do have the time and patience to dump stuff in the machine and plug it in

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Response to dembotoz (Reply #5)

Mon Oct 8, 2018, 12:38 PM

9. Try the No Knead recipes, honestly.

You basically just let time be the bread machine. And the result is amazing.

I'm now doing the Artisanal Bread in 5 minutes a day thing. I'll update on how that goes, but it's ostensibly even easier than the NYT No-Knead Bread method.

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Response to violetpastille (Original post)

Sun Sep 30, 2018, 10:35 PM

6. On the bread

That simple recipe is terrific.

In the 1990's I was an Engineer on a ship and we had a bread machine in the Engine Control Room. We had fresh bread at every meal. That machine was in use for several years. Amazing. The Interns ran it and one made a number of different types of bread. He was asked where he learned to bake, he made it up as he went. After I left the ship, we got a machine at home. You can make your own bread for about $0.15 per loaf.

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Response to violetpastille (Original post)

Mon Oct 1, 2018, 02:12 AM

8. I can't do it.

Every time I made bread, that pound and a half of bread, along with a 1/2 pound of butter was gone before it cooled off.


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