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Thu Nov 16, 2017, 11:22 PM

Study: Seaweed in Cow Feed Reduces Methane Emissions Almost Entirely Zoya Teirstein

https://www.google.ca/amp/s/foodtank.com/news/2017/06/seaweed-reduce-cow-methane-emission/amp/

Zoya Teirstein

"SNIP......


A recent study by researchers at James Cook University in Queensland, Australia, has found a certain type of Australian red algae can significantly inhibit methane emissions from cows. Led by Professor of Aquaculture Rocky De Nys, researchers found an addition of less than 2 percent dried seaweed to a cow’s diet can reduce methane emissions by 99 percent. The study was conducted in collaboration with the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), an Australian federal research agency.

Methane is about 25-times more potent than carbon dioxide in a 100-year time span, and a single cow releases between 70 and 120 kilograms of methane per year. Burps from cows account for 26 percent of the United States’ total methane emissions, and the U.S. is only the world’s fourth-largest producer of cattle, behind China, Brazil, and India. There are currently approximately 1.3 to 1.5 billion cows roaming the planet.

Researchers started investigating the potential effect of seaweed on cows in 2005, when a dairy farmer named Joe Dorgan inadvertently conducted an experiment on his herd in Prince Edward Island, Canada. Dorgan noticed cows that grazed on washed-up seaweed in paddocks along the shore were healthier and more productive than those that stayed in the field. He began feeding his cows a mixture of local storm-tossed seaweed and found the new diet saved him money and induced “rip-roaring heats,” or longer cycles of reproductive activity.

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A 2014 study by Canadian researchers Rob Kinley and Alan Fredeen confirmed the results of Dorgan’s experiment and found, in addition, that “feeding seaweeds and macroalgal products has been shown to reduce enteric methane emission from rumen fermentation.” In short, seaweed can reduce the amount of methane cows emit into the atmosphere with their gas. Kinley joined De Nys in Australia two years later to conduct further in vitro tests.


......SNIP"

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Reply Study: Seaweed in Cow Feed Reduces Methane Emissions Almost Entirely Zoya Teirstein (Original post)
applegrove Nov 2017 OP
applegrove Nov 2017 #1
Phoenix61 Nov 2017 #2
applegrove Nov 2017 #3
mopinko Nov 2017 #5
applegrove Nov 2017 #6
eppur_se_muova Nov 2017 #4

Response to applegrove (Original post)

Thu Nov 16, 2017, 11:23 PM

1. Cows, over 1 Billion of them, produce 10% of the world's greenhouse gasses.

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Response to applegrove (Original post)

Thu Nov 16, 2017, 11:52 PM

2. That is just flipping amazing!

What a simple solution to a serious problem.

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Response to Phoenix61 (Reply #2)

Fri Nov 17, 2017, 12:00 AM

3. They interviewed the man in antigonish Nova Scotia who started doing it.

Last edited Fri Nov 17, 2017, 04:00 AM - Edit history (1)

His forefathers had used seaweed to give minerals and variety to their cows. People on the ocean have all sorts of uses for seaweed. I had an aunt who used to plant her potatoes in seaweed. I used to tease her that they came out salted. But seriously what a game changer this discovery could be for the planet. I hope they can harvest that specific seaweed from all sorts of poor tropical Oceanside countries and spread the wealth that way too, as well as saving the planet.

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Response to applegrove (Reply #3)

Fri Nov 17, 2017, 10:23 AM

5. shouldnt need to harvest from the oceans. algae is easy to grow.

probably get a good feeds stock for it w a little manure.

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Response to mopinko (Reply #5)

Fri Nov 17, 2017, 05:08 PM

6. Well I hope local people in the tropics find work on the algae farms then.

The world will need billions of tons of it for the 1.3 billion cows.

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Response to applegrove (Original post)

Fri Nov 17, 2017, 09:47 AM

4. Does it work on humans ?

Just asking for a friend.

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