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Sun Jan 13, 2013, 04:17 PM

50 ways to change your habits and reduce climate change (so many of them will appeal to a frugal's

heart...)

I posted in GD, where it promptly sank. But I find a lot of articles posted here on DU about how awful things are; I'm interested in who is doing what ... aside from voting for the democrat on the ticket.

This was the thread; I changed the post title for this group.
***
So, what are you going to do about it?
Experts Fear Collapse of Global Civilization:
http://www.democraticunderground.com/10022178391

Lots of comments. But what should we actually be doing? What can you, as an individual, commit to doing regularly as a way to change your habits and reduce your impact on the environment?

Each one of us doing a little - or a lot more - to help can add up to a significant, positive impact.

Here are fifty suggestions, the first few are listed. And the first one is one of the most important:
http://www.squidoo.com/reduce-climate-change

1. Eat less meat, and eat more vegetables. Cattle are one of the largest producers of methane, a gas that helps contribute to global warming. Cut back on the meat, and you'll be contributing to less methane.

2. Use a more energy efficient vehicle to reduce emissions and oil use. The Toyota Prius always tops the list of most efficient cars, but don't forget the Accord, Sanata, and Jetta.

3. Plant a tree on your own, or in Brazil. You can make donations to help plant trees far away, or plant one locally to help produce more oxygen and filter our air.

4. Take public transportation. Even if you only take public transportation once a week or once a month, you're lessening potential emissions that contribute to climate change.

5. Turn the temperature down on your thermostat to save energy. Any energy you save lessens the amount of fossil fuels used at energy plants.

6. In the warmer months, use window and fan ventilation over air conditioning when possible instead of air conditioning (in your car, too).

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Arrow 19 replies Author Time Post
Reply 50 ways to change your habits and reduce climate change (so many of them will appeal to a frugal's (Original post)
Flaxbee Jan 2013 OP
cbayer Jan 2013 #1
Flaxbee Jan 2013 #3
cbayer Jan 2013 #5
freshwest Jan 2013 #16
fizzgig Jan 2013 #2
Flaxbee Jan 2013 #4
mbperrin Jan 2013 #6
cbayer Jan 2013 #7
athena Jan 2013 #18
cbayer Jan 2013 #19
fizzgig Jan 2013 #8
dimbear Jan 2013 #15
Curmudgeoness Jan 2013 #9
Flaxbee Jan 2013 #11
Curmudgeoness Jan 2013 #13
dimbear Jan 2013 #10
Flaxbee Jan 2013 #12
Curmudgeoness Jan 2013 #14
gejohnston Jan 2013 #17

Response to Flaxbee (Original post)

Sun Jan 13, 2013, 04:46 PM

1. Nice article. We already do so many of these things and have a very

small footprint, but we can always do more.

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Response to cbayer (Reply #1)

Sun Jan 13, 2013, 05:34 PM

3. hi there - your comment (along with a few others) gave the GD thread some life



Thanks!

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Response to Flaxbee (Reply #3)

Sun Jan 13, 2013, 05:36 PM

5. You are most welcome. It's a very excellent thread.

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Response to cbayer (Reply #1)

Tue Jan 15, 2013, 12:14 PM

16. Here, too. All 50.

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Response to Flaxbee (Original post)

Sun Jan 13, 2013, 05:22 PM

2. we just started turning off the power strip in the living room

we use it for the tv, wii, dvd player, stereo and cell phone charger. electric bill was 75 bucks last month, our baseboard heaters are kept at 60 and i wash my clothes on cold, so i figured that would be another way to cut our usage. we made a draft blocker for the door and need to get a piece of cardboard over the fire place, i know we lose a lot of heat there.

we have ac, but we're in a garden unit, so we don't even use it.

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Response to fizzgig (Reply #2)

Sun Jan 13, 2013, 05:35 PM

4. Every little bit helps!

I wish I could convince my husband to sleep in a cooler room -- I think that is one of the main reasons our winter power bill is high. Sigh.

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Response to Flaxbee (Reply #4)

Sun Jan 13, 2013, 06:09 PM

6. An electric blanket uses nearly no energy and the new ones are very cozy.

Feels even more so when your nose feels that cool nip. Our bill sank nearly $30 a month when we switched. And we're more comfortable.

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Response to Flaxbee (Reply #4)

Sun Jan 13, 2013, 06:12 PM

7. I love my down comforters.

I have several weights and change them out seasonally. Our boat is very cold at times and we keep it pretty wide open, but a down blanket does the trick.

The only downside is having to be the first one up in the morning, lol!

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Response to cbayer (Reply #7)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 01:37 PM

18. Down comforters are amazing.

A real down comforter is expensive, but it will save you many times its cost in the long run. Thanks to our down comforter, we've been able to leave the heat off at night all winter.

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Response to athena (Reply #18)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 02:07 PM

19. Agree - worth the investment up front.

They can last almost forever if you keep them in duvet covers. And I wash mine several times a year in the washing machine with no trouble.

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Response to Flaxbee (Reply #4)

Sun Jan 13, 2013, 06:27 PM

8. my husband complains sometimes

but i'm a furnace when i sleep and there's usually at least one cat in bed with us, so he deals with it pretty well.

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Response to Flaxbee (Reply #4)

Sun Jan 13, 2013, 09:17 PM

15. I don't suppose anybody else here is gravity challenged (as I am) but doing without

an electric blanket burns off calories very effectively. You can end up burning more while you're asleep than while you're awake. Cold is the chubby fellow's friend.

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Response to Flaxbee (Original post)

Sun Jan 13, 2013, 07:48 PM

9. This one made me laugh at myself.....

21. When you buy anything, buy for the long term instead of the short term. Buy a product that is going to last for a long time, instead of buying the disposable or short term version. A good example is clothing. Higher quality brands will last much longer and hold up better, while cheaper brands often only get a few short wears.


I still use the safety razor that I got when I first started shaving my legs. It still works fine. Talk about not using disposables! That means no trash for about 45 years!

But the one tip that I will not do is to go camping on vacation instead of using a hotel. I used to do that all the time. But it is just too much work anymore and I am getting too old to keep up with it. When I go on "vacation", I want to totally relax. Sorry, folks.

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Response to Curmudgeoness (Reply #9)

Sun Jan 13, 2013, 09:00 PM

11. oh no, no no no no. I do NOT camp. Hate it.

I'll re-use the towels, tell them they I don't require clean sheets every morning, etc. (if I'm staying in a room more than one night, obviously).

I'll be as eco-friendly as I can. And we have a friend who is building eco-hotels; we may be able to work with them this year on implementing alt-energy routines into their hotel systems. But I DO NOT camp. Never have liked it. If I go away on 'vacation', I want to get a good night's rest!

And the comment about higher priced items lasting longer is mostly true, but not always. I think a better way to have stated that would be to look for items made sustainably, which do cost more, but are better for everyone in the long run. Unfortunately, a lot of the 'designer brands' are now producing their crap right next to the cheaper stuff in Chinese factories (Ralph Lauren, I'm looking at you). Unless you buy couture, which is hugely wasteful anyway.

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Response to Flaxbee (Reply #11)

Sun Jan 13, 2013, 09:07 PM

13. Very good point about higher priced = better quality.

I have also seen some very expensive items that are trashy. You really do have to look at how things are made, what they are made out of, and how much more the price is than something comparable. And more importantly, do you really need it? That is where I usually end it. I will say that clothes are one of those really iffy items as to quality these days, no matter how much you pay.

I also get high quality items at thrift stores, because I can see how well they hold up over time. If they really look good there, I know it will hold up to whatever I throw at it.

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Response to Flaxbee (Original post)

Sun Jan 13, 2013, 08:27 PM

10. My bed was made in 1890.

No, no, that's not the last time I changed the sheets, it was manufactured back then. When I bought it at the flea market it was black. Brass underneath corrosion.

I would guess that it will never wear out.

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Response to dimbear (Reply #10)

Sun Jan 13, 2013, 09:00 PM

12. Wow. Probably will last several more lifetimes...

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Response to dimbear (Reply #10)

Sun Jan 13, 2013, 09:10 PM

14. THAT is why I love antiques.

I know people who are appalled that I would use "other people's trash", as they consider antiques, but they are well made and last much longer than anything they made today (even though you would think that with all our technology, we should be able to do better than ever). Also, if I ever get tired of the item, it is usually going to be worth as much or more than I paid for it. Try that with new items!

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Response to Flaxbee (Original post)

Tue Jan 15, 2013, 08:45 PM

17. most of these are so easy, it doesn't take

any effort. Cool.

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