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Mon Aug 13, 2012, 11:51 PM

Coffee pots

When I was growing up on the farm, what we had to make coffee was a stainless steel pot with a spout. You'd fill it with water, add how many spoonfuls of coffee as you desired and boiled it on the stove for a few minutes. One had to pour the coffee thru a hand held strainer when filling a cup to catch the coffee grounds but that's the way most everyone did it back then.

I have a programmable (a feature I don't use) electric drip coffee maker right now but when that craps out, I'm going to look for a stainless steel stovetop coffee percolator. They run about $20.00 to $35.00 (depending on size and quality) on Amazon.com and pretty much last a lifetime. Unlike the modern drip coffee makers which seem to last about a year.

Considering I love my coffee, I ought to look for one now so I have it on hand when my electric drip coffee make craps out. Or I could just give it to my ex who says her coffee maker is running very slow now even after repeated cleaning. She gets very hard water where she lives.

Here's an example of one for those not familiar with stovetop percolators:

http://www.amazon.com/Coleman-12-Cup-Stainless-Coffee-Percolator/dp/B0009PUQSM/ref=pd_sim_hg_3

And here are some tips on using stovetop and electric coffee percolators:

http://www.ehow.com/how_7449021_use-stovetop-coffee-percolator.html

http://www.talkaboutcoffee.com/how-to-make-coffee-in-a-percolator.html

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Arrow 35 replies Author Time Post
Reply Coffee pots (Original post)
Kaleva Aug 2012 OP
Manifestor_of_Light Aug 2012 #1
NRaleighLiberal Aug 2012 #2
Kaleva Aug 2012 #3
NRaleighLiberal Aug 2012 #4
Curmudgeoness Aug 2012 #14
Kaleva Aug 2012 #16
Curmudgeoness Aug 2012 #17
Flaxbee Aug 2012 #25
TreasonousBastard Aug 2012 #5
Kaleva Aug 2012 #7
NYC_SKP Aug 2012 #6
cbayer Aug 2012 #8
Kaleva Aug 2012 #9
cbayer Aug 2012 #10
Kaleva Aug 2012 #11
cbayer Aug 2012 #12
Kaleva Aug 2012 #13
Sherman A1 Aug 2012 #19
athena Jan 2013 #29
guardian Jan 2013 #32
Curmudgeoness Aug 2012 #15
Sherman A1 Aug 2012 #18
Kaleva Aug 2012 #20
NMDemDist2 Aug 2012 #21
Lars39 Aug 2012 #22
NMDemDist2 Aug 2012 #23
Lars39 Aug 2012 #24
snappyturtle Aug 2012 #26
Kaleva Aug 2012 #27
snappyturtle Aug 2012 #28
kristopher Jan 2013 #30
jambo101 Jan 2013 #31
Kaleva Oct 2013 #33
Squinch Oct 2013 #34
Kennah Oct 2013 #35

Response to Kaleva (Original post)

Mon Aug 13, 2012, 11:54 PM

1. I still have my parents' stainless steel percolator which is tall.

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Response to Kaleva (Original post)

Mon Aug 13, 2012, 11:59 PM

2. We've been French Press coffee exclusively for 10 years at least.

Love the richness and body and complexity of coffee made in that way...also roast our own coffee for the last 5 years. Very spoiled now!

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Response to NRaleighLiberal (Reply #2)

Tue Aug 14, 2012, 12:11 AM

3. I'm not familiar with French Press so I'll go and read about them.

Edit: Looks like a good option for many. I'm not fussy about the taste of my coffee and will drink even day old stuff and I'd have to buy a grinder which looks like they'd run about $50.00.

Now if whole coffee beans are alot cheaper then ground coffee, this may be the way to go and the initial investment will be worth it.

2nd Edit: I have a doctor's appointment tomorrow so maybe I'll stop at the store near by and check out the prices of whole bean coffee.

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Response to Kaleva (Reply #3)

Tue Aug 14, 2012, 06:51 PM

14. I have this coffee grinder.

You do not have to spend big bucks for one.

http://www.searsoutlet.com/d/product_details.jsp?pid=86633&mode=buyNewOnly&sid=IDx20110411x000008&ci_sku=N86633&ci_gpa=pla&ci_kw={keyword}

Coffee beans are not cheaper, at least not roasted beans. But the coffee is much richer when they are fresh ground. (I have never tried roasting my own and don't know if the raw beans are cheaper or not.)

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Response to Curmudgeoness (Reply #14)

Tue Aug 14, 2012, 07:24 PM

16. Wow. Just $5.99!

Edit: Damn. Just remembered I was to check the prices on roasted coffee beans when I stopped at the store after my doctor's appointment. Forgot to do that.

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Response to Kaleva (Reply #16)

Tue Aug 14, 2012, 07:43 PM

17. Well, probably not just $5.99

depending on where you live. You might have to pay shipping too. I would. Mine was not that cheap, but it was not expensive. But it does the job for enough coffee for one pot at a time....you have to hold the button down until it is ground, but no big deal.

And a tip: If you keep the beans in the refrigerator to keep them fresh, you don't want to go straight from the frig to the grinder. Well, you can, but the ground coffee sticks in there and you have to work to get it out.

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Response to NRaleighLiberal (Reply #2)

Sun Aug 19, 2012, 01:28 AM

25. Agree. French presses are really nice. Also great to use if you want to make tea from

loose leaves rather than tea bags.

Love our French press. I'll put cinnamon or other spices in with the coffee grounds, too - the press is just a very versatile way to make coffee or other hot drinks.

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Response to Kaleva (Original post)

Tue Aug 14, 2012, 12:21 AM

5. I'd never get a stovetop percolator...

I've left pots on the stove boiling dry too many times, and it's inexcusable for a coffeepot.

I do like percolators, but if I get another one it will be electric. I have an induction teapot that boils water in half the time my stovetop teapot does, and use it with a "single-serve" drip filter holder or a French press. The stove top one whistles loudly, which reduces the chances of boiling out, and the induction pot just shuts off when the water comes to a boil.

All this is admittedly a bit of a pain in the ass, and I'm always tempted to pull my programmable electric drip pot out of storage.



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Response to TreasonousBastard (Reply #5)

Tue Aug 14, 2012, 12:29 AM

7. The electric drip coffeee makers are convenient

Mine has an automatic shut off feature.

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Response to Kaleva (Original post)

Tue Aug 14, 2012, 12:28 AM

6. In my childhood world everybody had a Pyrex Percolator.

 

One aunt had an electric. She was shunned.

I still, to this day, have a Pyrex percolator.

It is the best.

..

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Response to Kaleva (Original post)

Tue Aug 14, 2012, 11:30 AM

8. We exclusively use this:



Stovetop as well, but makes expresso strength coffee. Works great, and since finished coffee is in the top portion, it does not burn if left on the stove top.

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Response to cbayer (Reply #8)

Tue Aug 14, 2012, 11:41 AM

9. I drink alot of coffee but it can't be strong.

One cup of strong coffee will throw my insides for a loop.

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Response to Kaleva (Reply #9)

Tue Aug 14, 2012, 11:43 AM

10. This is not for you, then, as the coffee is very strong.

Enjoy our new percolator!

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Response to cbayer (Reply #10)

Tue Aug 14, 2012, 11:54 AM

11. Interesting that there are many different options

For instance, I had never heard of the French Press coffee makers till last night.

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Response to Kaleva (Reply #11)

Tue Aug 14, 2012, 12:14 PM

12. I used to use them a lot, but it's difficult to keep coffee warm once made.

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Response to cbayer (Reply #12)

Tue Aug 14, 2012, 12:32 PM

13. I prefer my coffee to be at least room temperature and preferably colder.

I'll fill my large coffee cup with ice to chill the first couple cups of hot, freshly made coffee.

So I think a stovetop peculator would work best for me but not everyone likes day old, room temperature, not strong coffee!

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Response to cbayer (Reply #12)

Wed Aug 15, 2012, 04:59 AM

19. Try this thermos travel mug

I have two of them and fill them after I make coffee in the AM. They will keep things hot for about 5 to 6 hours. When I leave one in my car with ice tea it will still be cold after sitting on a parking lot all day in triple digit temps. I picked mine up at Target for around $25.00 and the only complaint I have is that you need to be real careful with the handle, but there is a version without handle that is a bit cheaper.

http://www.amazon.com/Thermos-16-Ounce-Vacuum-Insulated-Travel/dp/B0039SLSUQ/ref=pd_sim_k_6

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Response to Kaleva (Reply #9)

Mon Jan 21, 2013, 02:42 PM

29. You can add hot water to it.

That's what I did for three years while I lived in Switzerland. There was simply no space for a coffee maker in my tiny apartment.

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Response to cbayer (Reply #8)

Thu Jan 31, 2013, 05:21 PM

32. I have one of those too.

 

Works great for expresso type coffee. But sometimes I prefer just a 'regular' cup of coffee from a french press (better) or auto drip (just okay).

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Response to Kaleva (Original post)

Tue Aug 14, 2012, 06:58 PM

15. I bought an old electric perculator at a garage sale

several years ago for a couple of bucks. It is from the 1940's and it is still perking. You might want to keep an eye open at thrift stores or garage sales.

Also, since French presses are not cheap, see if you can find one to try before you buy one. I was given one as a gift and I cannot even drink that coffee. Maybe I'm not doing it right, but I have tried.

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Response to Kaleva (Original post)

Wed Aug 15, 2012, 04:52 AM

18. To each their own, however I have a programable electric drip coffee maker and

am very happy with it. Yes, they do eventually fail, however I get several years out of them and simply replace them when the do. I am not sure how frugal, heating up the stove top is in comparison to a counter top electric appliance, but it may be more efficient. I find that having the thermal carafe & two thermal travel mugs ensures that my coffee remains hot for me when I get to it.

Yet again, to each their own.

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Response to Sherman A1 (Reply #18)

Wed Aug 15, 2012, 12:08 PM

20. I'm looking for a cumulative effect.

I'm not going to save big bucks by switching to a stovetop percolator coffee maker. Electric drip coffee makers last about a year or so here because of the hard water, I wouldn't need to buy paper filters and it's cheaper to heat water with natural gas then with electricity. The monthly savings would be barely noticeable but when combined with other things I'm doing or have done, it all adds up.

I also found this thread to be interesting as I now know there are other methods to make coffee that I had not heard of before.

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Response to Kaleva (Original post)

Fri Aug 17, 2012, 09:39 PM

21. if i had to give up my fully auto espresso machine

(ok, yeah I'm a coffee snob, sorry)

when ever you boil coffee and put liquid over the grounds more than once you get bitter acidic brew. i can't and won't ever go there again!

i'd go back to the tried and true melitta cone and my tea kettle to boil water


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Response to NMDemDist2 (Reply #21)

Fri Aug 17, 2012, 11:57 PM

22. We've been using that method for a few years now...

Ever since I found a new, still in package, covered in dust, 8 cup pot at the thrift store.

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Response to Lars39 (Reply #22)

Sat Aug 18, 2012, 06:44 PM

23. Score!!

and it makes lovely coffee doesn't it?

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Response to NMDemDist2 (Reply #23)

Sat Aug 18, 2012, 10:53 PM

24. Practically danced my way to the check outs!

Makes a darn good cup of coffee, too.

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Response to Kaleva (Original post)

Sun Aug 19, 2012, 02:32 AM

26. A fun site on what I would call 'Coffee Trivia' of sorts:

http://www.spillingthebeanschicago.com/questions-and-answers

Edit: Forgot to ask if anyone makes egg coffee?
Edit #2!: sticky 'n' key....spelling

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Response to snappyturtle (Reply #26)

Sun Aug 19, 2012, 11:21 AM

27. Hmmmm. I always thought coffee stayed fresher longer if kept in the fridge.

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Response to Kaleva (Reply #27)

Sun Aug 19, 2012, 12:00 PM

28. I learned about this some time ago and I think it is right. nt

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Response to Kaleva (Original post)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 07:03 AM

30. This is what we use.



The Yama Syphon (or Siphon) Brewer is most likely the fanciest way to make coffee you'll ever see. For coffee geeks, it's not merely an entertaining way to make coffee, but one of the best brewing methods created. The full-immersion brewing, consistant brew temperature, and cloth filter combine to bring out the best in your coffee. Simply pour 40 oz. of water into the bottom glass, attach firmly the upper glass chamber, and heat it over the stove until it slowly begins to boil. If it is heating too fast and boiling rapidly, monitor the heat source to ensure a slower boil. At this point, the water will rise into the upper glass and saturate the waiting grounds. Some even recommend to wait until about 1/2 - 3/4 of the water has risen to the upper glass to dump the grounds into the top glass. Once every last drop of flavor has been extracted from the ground coffee (will take approximately 2 minutes depending upon desired strength), remove from the stove (careful, the bottom will be hot) and the coffee will be drawn down through the tube (and filter) into the lower glass. To serve, simply remove the upper glass and set it in the top/lid. The bottom container can now be used as a serving vessel. Enjoy!

This listing is for the 8 Cup Stovetop Siphon. For other sizes and options see our 5 Cup Stovetop Siphon, 3 Cup Tabletop Siphon, and 5 Cup Tabletop Siphon listings.

http://prima-coffee.com/brewer/yama-coffee-vacpot-8-cup-stovetop-siphon-syphon

$36 and shipping is included. The stovetop works well for us, but we've sent our daughter in college the tabletop version to take to the lab.

We make our own filters out of an unused gifted sweatshirt that was too small for me. These coffeemakers used to be popular in the US during the 40s and 50s but were replaced by electric percolators during the early "labor-saving device" push by electric utilities. They are still widely in use in coffeeshops around Japan, which is where I first came across them 35 years ago.

Guaranteed the best coffee you'll ever brew.

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Response to Kaleva (Original post)

Thu Jan 31, 2013, 03:48 AM

31. Stove top

Few years ago i was looking for an espresso machine and was willing to drop a few thousand dollars,i was fortunate in running into an Italian customer also looking for an espresso machine and we got to talking and i asked him what would be the best machine for home use, he said every Italian family he knew used a stove top espresso maker and these $2K models were really just for the Starbucks crowd..
$40 and 4 years later the unit i ended up buying still works fine and makes a damn good cup of coffee.
here she is

[link:|

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Response to Kaleva (Original post)

Mon Oct 14, 2013, 05:32 AM

33. My cheap coffee making system

1 stock pot with cover
1 hand held fine mesh strainer
1 1/3 measuring cup
1 2 quart pitcher

In the stock pot, I pour in 2 quarts plus a couple of cups of water and 2 close to full 1/3 cups of coffee ( I use the 1/3 measuring cup 'cause it's smaller and it's easier to get the coffee out of the can)in the stock pot. Put the cover on the stock pot and heat on the stove till boiling then simmer for another 5 minutes. I let the coffee cool down to room temp in the pot before placing the sieve over the opening of the 2 quart pitcher and pouring the coffee into the pitcher.

As I drink my coffee room temperature or colder, I use a plastic juice pitcher. The reason I add a couple of extra cups of water is that the coffee grounds will retain some of the water. If you use just 2 quarts of water, you'll not end up with 2 quarts of coffee.

This method of making coffee is pretty much the way my parents made it and pretty much everyone else I knew when i was young made it although they had regular coffee pots while I'm using a stock pot.

Electric drip coffee makers last about 1-2 years in this area because of the hard water even with regular cleaning. The one I have is getting very slow and rather then go out and buy another, I spent $1 on the hand held strainer and another $2.50 on the plastic juice pitcher. The stock pot and cover I already had. And because I have a LP gas stove, I can make coffee even if the power goes out.

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Response to Kaleva (Original post)

Sun Oct 20, 2013, 08:53 PM

34. I use a french press, but I got a stainless steel one because I kept breaking the

glass ones. Bodum sells them. It costs a bit, but I've had it for 15 years and it looks likely to last a lifetime.

I would bet you could get a second hand one on ebay for much less than new.

Makes fabulous coffee.

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Response to Kaleva (Original post)

Tue Oct 22, 2013, 02:00 AM

35. Great thing about a french press is no disposable filters to replace

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