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Fri Aug 23, 2013, 09:46 PM

World-first pilot plant to turn carbon dioxide into rock

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-08-23/world-first-pilot-plant-will-turn-carbon-dioxide-into-rock/4908324

"We could be making millions of tonnes of bricks and pavers which really could be green products for the future," he said.

He says the project is about permanently transforming carbon dioxide, not just storing it in the ground.

Orica chief executive Ian Smith says the technology will enable every power station in the world to capture carbon dioxide emissions and turn them into rock.

11 replies, 2560 views

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Arrow 11 replies Author Time Post
Reply World-first pilot plant to turn carbon dioxide into rock (Original post)
TalkingDog Aug 2013 OP
BlueStreak Aug 2013 #1
Wilms Aug 2013 #7
napi21 Aug 2013 #2
PoliticAverse Aug 2013 #3
longship Aug 2013 #4
TalkingDog Aug 2013 #5
longship Aug 2013 #6
Ghost Dog Aug 2013 #10
napoleon_in_rags Aug 2013 #8
mopinko Aug 2013 #9
Nihil Aug 2013 #11

Response to TalkingDog (Original post)

Fri Aug 23, 2013, 09:57 PM

1. Now THAT'S what I'm talkin' about

 

Last edited Fri Aug 23, 2013, 11:42 PM - Edit history (1)

I always thought that pumping the ground full of CO2 gas was a laughable idea. Over time, most of that gas would seep back into the atmosphere. If these guys have a way to economically bind CO2 into a rocky substance, that could be a difference maker.

Of course, they don't say anything about cost or scalability.

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Response to BlueStreak (Reply #1)

Fri Aug 23, 2013, 10:31 PM

7. That's what they're hoping to find out.

 

"The technology is proven in the lab and we now want to see if we can scale it to reduce the cost to be in line with a future carbon price," said Mineral Carbonation International CEO John Dawe.

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/breaking-news/plant-turns-carbon-emission-into-bricks/story-fni0xqi4-1226702909377

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Response to TalkingDog (Original post)

Fri Aug 23, 2013, 09:57 PM

2. That sounds like a great idea. I hope it works and can be used everywhwere. nt

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Response to TalkingDog (Original post)

Fri Aug 23, 2013, 09:58 PM

3. I didn't see anything in the article about what it costs and how much energy it requires.

(and by what it costs I mean per amount of CO2 converted).

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Response to TalkingDog (Original post)

Fri Aug 23, 2013, 10:10 PM

4. Too bad it's not Mozart, or Bach.

At least it isn't Rap, or whatever they call it now. I'd even go for turning CO2 into jazz. But Rock is so common.

Maybe when they get the technology together we can get something other than loud guitars and drums.


Still, it's a first step. When they get to Gershwin or Benny Goodman, let me know.

Here's some Goodman, at his best at Carnegie Hall in 1938. With the incredible Gene Krupa on drums. It brought the house down. Sing, Sing, Sing!


As Duke Ellington said, "If the music sounds good, it is good."



On edit: the correct Carnegie Hall Sing, Sing, Sing. Enjoy, people!

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Response to longship (Reply #4)

Fri Aug 23, 2013, 10:14 PM

5. Spankings for you!



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Response to TalkingDog (Reply #5)

Fri Aug 23, 2013, 10:16 PM

6. I shan't apologize.




Or, I will take my punishment!

Do listen to the Goodman, though.

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Response to longship (Reply #6)

Sat Aug 24, 2013, 10:57 AM

10. Heh.

It's all "World Music", ya know!

(Permit me to introduce my current music production/publishing project (under construction, in both technical and human senses) -> http://www.aridisland.com/records/ <- good sounds? )

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Response to TalkingDog (Original post)

Sat Aug 24, 2013, 03:10 AM

8. That's what I'm talkin about. MILLIONS of solid compounds contain carbon.

All we need to do is focus on the reactions that produce them, out of C02, or out of hydrocarbons in an productive manner.

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Response to TalkingDog (Original post)

Sat Aug 24, 2013, 09:30 AM

9. seems to me a few years ago someone had a plan to make drywall.

which ought to be pretty easy.

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Response to TalkingDog (Original post)

Tue Aug 27, 2013, 06:01 AM

11. If it sounds too good to be true ...?

 

From their Q & A PDF:

> 4. How does the process work?
> Basic rock such as serpentinite is mined, crushed, heated and then mixed with water
> and pressurised with CO2 to speed up the natural carbonation reaction which in turn
> forms stable magnesium carbonate powder and sand.

All of those processes (mining, crushing, heating, mixing with water, CO2 pressurisation)
require additional energy input (some require a lot of it).


> 6. Will mineral carbonation mean more mining?
> In general, yes, more mining will be required to supply the minerals for carbonation.
> By doing this, the mining industry could in fact become a large part of the solution to
> our most pressing global environmental problem.

The salient phrase is "yes, more mining will be required".


> 7. How much mining is required for mineral carbonation?
> The mining scale will be smaller than the scale of mining for coal. In fact, to secure
> all the CO2 produced from coal, only half as much mineral silicate rock will be needed
> as the original amount of rock mined to extract the coal that produced the CO2.

So ... only half a mountain top at a time then?


All of the above are merely question marks and I truly hope that the result of this
pilot study is genuinely beneficial to the environment rather than just to the company.

"Orica is the largest provider of commercial explosives and blasting systems to the mining
and infrastructure markets, the global leader in the provision of ground support in mining
and tunnelling, and the leading supplier of sodium cyanide for gold extraction. "

Pardon my cynicism here but I feel that this plays into the increasingly frantic search
for a silver bullet that will allow Business As Usual ...


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