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Mon Jun 14, 2021, 12:35 AM

How radical gardeners took back New York City - Vox



Seed bombs, the "tree lady of Brooklyn," and the roots of urban gardening.

New York City looked a lot different in the 1960s and 1970s. A sharp economic decline and white flight meant there was mass disinvestment and urban decay, particularly in the city’s lower-income neighborhoods. It’s what Hattie Carthan and Liz Christy noticed in their communities when they each set out to revive their neighborhoods by making them greener. Ultimately, their radical acts of gardening would transform the landscape across New York City.



Learn more about the Hattie Carthan Community Garden and Farmer’s Market: https://www.hattiecarthancommunitymarket.com/

Learn more about the Liz Christy Garden: http://lizchristygarden.us/

Learn more about Karen Washington’s work: https://www.karenthefarmer.com/

Check out the Green Guerillas’ ongoing work: https://www.greenguerillas.org

Learn more about the casita gardens across New York: https://ny.curbed.com/2015/10/1/9915402/inside-the-casitas-of-the-south-bronxs-community-gardens

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Reply How radical gardeners took back New York City - Vox (Original post)
Rhiannon12866 Jun 14 OP
calimary Jun 14 #1
Rhiannon12866 Jun 14 #2
NJCher Jun 14 #3
Rhiannon12866 Jun 14 #4
NJCher Jun 14 #5
Rhiannon12866 Jun 14 #6
electric_blue68 Jun 14 #7
Rhiannon12866 Jun 14 #8
electric_blue68 Jun 14 #9
Rhiannon12866 Jun 14 #10
appalachiablue Jun 14 #11
mopinko Jun 14 #12
DBoon Jun 14 #13

Response to Rhiannon12866 (Original post)

Mon Jun 14, 2021, 01:17 AM

1. COOL!!!!!

We need more of this, in EVERY city and town!

More green! More trees and bushes and flowering plants! Just makes everything better, not to mention prettier.

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Response to calimary (Reply #1)

Mon Jun 14, 2021, 01:21 AM

2. Isn't this just delightful?! And these tough ladies had a pretty rough fight!

But they spawned a movement that is still thriving today. And I agree, every city could benefit from activism to make them greener!

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Response to Rhiannon12866 (Original post)

Mon Jun 14, 2021, 01:29 AM

3. This made my day

This is what I do, only at schools.

Last week Karen Washington did an interview on local public radio in which she said the food pantries are long term unsustainable. We have to improve economic equality. No one should go to a food bank on a regular basis for their groceries.

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Response to NJCher (Reply #3)

Mon Jun 14, 2021, 01:50 AM

4. How wonderful!

And I couldn't agree more. And this is also what Michelle Obama did, started gardens at the White House and taught kids to plant vegetables. I thought that was such an important effort. And these gardens have changed cities and lives - as does teaching people how to grow their own food.

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Response to Rhiannon12866 (Reply #4)

Mon Jun 14, 2021, 02:53 AM

5. Thank You

For bringing us this important video.

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Response to NJCher (Reply #5)

Mon Jun 14, 2021, 03:08 AM

6. Thank you!

I'm so glad that I found it! There isn't as much news on weekends, so I looked through some of my "subscriptions" and I loved this one so much that I just had to share it...

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Response to Rhiannon12866 (Original post)

Mon Jun 14, 2021, 04:06 AM

7. I got involved in a few of the marches when Mayor Rudie was...

trying to mess with the gardens on the Lower East Side. My sister had been involved with them - I think she was helping them with promoting the issues they were having with Guliani to a wider audience, and champion the gardens. So I was hearing this from her.
We had been luck enough to live right by medium green spaces growing up, and later not far away frim a very big park. So we wanted to help spread good greenery around!
Plus I'e been reading about urban gardening, organic gardening etc off & on since mid '80s, and visiting our Green Markets. So I was cheering that arpect along with h the general Green Oasis part.

I think also one time there was a tour...so we went around and visited ?5 gardens. It was so 💖 wonderful, inventive, helpful, and soothing!

One of coolest things was noticing some had Willow Trees growing in them! Some of you know Willow trees grow by water. Well it turns out that when NYC street were being paved (along with sidewalks) that area had underground streams! that still existed so those trees would grow there as well. 🥰

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Response to electric_blue68 (Reply #7)

Mon Jun 14, 2021, 04:24 AM

8. That is very cool! And the video did say they had fights with Rudy. Of course. *sigh*

And I agree, everyone needs green spaces in their lives. And that's just wonderful that your sister got involved. These foresighted women and the groups that formed did an amazing job of transforming so many parts of The City. Obviously, with the willow trees, gardens and trees were meant to grow there. I'm fortunate, live upstate near the Adirondacks, lots of woods. In fact, I stopped for a small deer on my way home earlier tonight. I rolled down my window and told him to get back into the woods - and he did! Whew!

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Response to Rhiannon12866 (Reply #8)

Mon Jun 14, 2021, 04:37 AM

9. They truly did! I live in a ....

nabe now that has a somewhat tree deficit. There were replantings during Bloomberg's asmin. but not all of them took.

The two big wonderful trees between my apt building and the next they (while still releafing this Spring, phew) lost 2/3rds of their canopy - the parts that overhung over our sidewalk with glorious shade and "stainglass greens" walking underneath them. 🥰

My sis lives next to one of the biggest parks in Manhattan. I plan to start visiting it, one closer but northwest or me (I live in the Bronx but not that far away), have two on the south and bottom of Manhattan. My usual go tos pre covid! 🌳🌳🌳
Plus 2 Botanic Gardens! 🥰

Woods are lovely, too. In fact the park she lives by has the last original forest left in Manhattan (!) up on the hill while th lower part was partially created.

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Response to electric_blue68 (Reply #9)

Mon Jun 14, 2021, 04:56 AM

10. Yes, they did say that not all of the plantings were successful.

And you are fortunate to have trees nearby. Where I parked tonight, in the shade of a large tree, my friend pointed out that there were caterpillars all over! And while the rest of the trees in the vicinity have gotten all their leaves (no big surprise since it pours here almost every day), that one is still bare. So it happens. It's at the local municipal center, so I'm hoping that they have someone come and take a look at it.

And it's fortunate that you have nearby parks to visit. We have lots of woods and mountains, but there has been a lot of recent development (including where I live) that was originally just woods - hence the deer. Most of my neighbors are big on their lawns and landscaping, but I prefer leaving as many trees as possible, it bothers me when they cut them down.

My mother's closest friend and neighbor passed away 2 years ago and they inexplicably cut down all the trees on the property before refurbishing and selling the house - including a giant pine on the corner of the property that she just loved - and a crab apple tree that she planted herself. I don't get it and it bothers me every time I drive by.

So it's not just planting that we need to do - but preserving what we already have.

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Response to Rhiannon12866 (Original post)

Mon Jun 14, 2021, 08:29 AM

11. I love it, good for plants, the environment ,

people and democracy. Thanks for sharing!

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Response to Rhiannon12866 (Original post)

Mon Jun 14, 2021, 08:59 AM

12. green warrior checking in.

northeast corner of chicago. rogers park neighborhood.
my little farm is in year 9. started w a lot that was below grade in some places by 5'.
1st 2 years were mostly making soil and not worrying about weeds.

went from there to about 1/3 just wild. native plants re-emerged.
looking out my window now at a parkway full of yellow clover and thistles, and a front yard full of milkweed. the progression of common stuff to wildflowers i've never seen around here has been astounding. i watched the plants for years before i bought it. these things can't grow when you mow it all down. leave it be, and it just unfolds.

there have been fights, but so far i have won them all.

and i've met the nicest people. i have a new customer who goes seed bombing.
her autistic son insists on my eggs, so she gets 1st dibs.
she has a side hustle making jams and also herbal extracts. she's gonna start buying some of those weeds.

most people love the place.

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Response to Rhiannon12866 (Original post)

Mon Jun 14, 2021, 10:05 AM

13. I remember hearing about the East 11th Street Movement

They inspired me in my younger environmentalist days:

https://thevillagesun.com/remembering-e-11th-st-green-power-pioneers


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