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Thu Oct 31, 2019, 02:10 PM

Coca-Cola, Nestl, and PepsiCo are the Top 3 Plastic Polluters on the Planet

An annual global audit from the Break Free From Plastic movement has found the largest sources of plastic pollution. Coca-Cola, Nestlé, and PepsiCo are the top three most identified companies as sources of plastic pollution around the globe.

As part of their audit, Break Free From Plastic conducted 484 cleanups in 50 countries, on six continents. According to the audit, part of the problem is that plastic is not recyclable. Only 9% of plastic produced since 1950 has been recycled. The rest is incinerated, in landfills or left pollution in oceans, land and other areas. When plastic is burned it causes toxic pollution. If not incinerated or recycled, it breaks down into microplastics, which cause harm to ocean life.

43% of collected plastic was marked with a clear consumer brand, like Coca-Cola or PepsiCo. Break Free From Plastic blames our “throwaway culture,” for much of the consumer waste. They argue that this throwaway mindset is at the core of many companies’ business model.

Greenpeace Southeast Asia plastic campaign coordinator Abigal Aguilar said of the audit, “Recent commitments by corporations like Coca-Cola, Nestlé, and PepsiCo to address the crisis unfortunately continue to rely on false solutions like replacing plastic with paper or bioplastics and relying more heavily on a broken global recycling system. These strategies largely protect the outdated throwaway business model that caused the plastic pollution crisis, and will do nothing to prevent these brands from being named the top polluters again in the future.”

As China stops accepting and importing plastics for recycling, the rest of the world is scrambling to find solutions for the excess of plastic bottles created by these companies.

https://www.onegreenplanet.org/environment/coca-cola-nestle-pepsi-top-plastic-polluters/

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Reply Coca-Cola, Nestl, and PepsiCo are the Top 3 Plastic Polluters on the Planet (Original post)
douglas9 Oct 31 OP
IcyPeas Oct 31 #1
mahatmakanejeeves Oct 31 #2
IcyPeas Oct 31 #3
matt819 Oct 31 #4
fierywoman Oct 31 #5
abqtommy Oct 31 #7
abqtommy Oct 31 #6
OxQQme Oct 31 #8

Response to douglas9 (Original post)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 02:17 PM

1. can they box it instead I wonder?

this water company is using boxes:
Features
100% pure refreshing water free of any contaminants or things you don’t need
100% recyclable, refillable & BPA free
74% of our box is paper made from trees - a renewable resource
64% less carbon emissions compared to plastic bottles
Our boxes ship flat to our filler, 26 times more efficient compared to shipping empty plastic bottles to be filled.
We offer 24 pack, 12 pack & 6 pack options for our 500mL unit size

?v=1563561929

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Response to IcyPeas (Reply #1)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 02:20 PM

2. Boxed water is not pressurized. NT

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Response to mahatmakanejeeves (Reply #2)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 02:22 PM

3. oh. right.

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Response to douglas9 (Original post)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 02:46 PM

4. Once more. Privatize the profits, socialize the costs.

It has always been thus.

I don't really see an alternative, except for banning stuff, e.g., no more bottled water. When you go to the grocery store you realize that most of the stuff it sells is some variation of water. I'm exaggerating, but there are multiple aisles of water, juices, energy drinks, etc. I try to buy in bulk, but that will take you only just so far. And there aren't enough people willing or able to do that to make a major dent in the production of plastics.

So you put a tax on manufacturers and users of plastic, money to go to a fund for, well, for something to be determined. Recycling. Remediation. Anti-pollution measures. So the prices of those items goes up, and "the little guy" ends up paying the price. In the meantime, the additional cash generated by the tax is earning interest, and so they're making more money until they pass that tax along to whatever agency imposes it. It just gets nuttier and nuttier.

In my small town, we take our stuff to the dump (okay, the transfer station). We sort out our recycling.

Right now the dump has stopped taking plastics 3-7 because there's no market for it. They take 1 & 2. The local food co-op used to take all, but they no longer take 1 & 2.

Boxes: The dump has stopped taking printed cardboard food packaging, i.e, pasta boxes, cereal boxes, etc. Only uncoated corrugated cardboard. Again, no market for it.

Bottom line is that Coke, Pepsi, and Nestle have already banked their profits before countries, states, cities and towns have to deal with the cost of the garbage that those products generate.

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Response to douglas9 (Original post)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 03:20 PM

5. Don't they all push/sell awful amounts of sugar in their products?

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Response to fierywoman (Reply #5)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 04:52 PM

7. Yes, but they don't put sugar in their diet or sugar-free drinks. They use artificial

sweeteners instead and some people say that they're worse for human consumption than sugar. But I buy diet drinks since I have a choice.

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Response to douglas9 (Original post)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 04:48 PM

6. There's a lot of factors to consider here. First, if there was no demand for their products then

companies wouldn't be using large amounts of plastic in bottling their products. Maybe the companies
could support recycling of bottles or the imposition of a bottle deposit. Note: 11 US states have used or
are using bottle deposits to reduce litter and encourage recycling.

Are these solutions unworkable for the rest of us or are we too lazy to do anything about it except clutch our pearls as we recline on our fainting couches? I'm afraid I'm just as complacent as anyone since when I put plastics of any kind out in my trash I just assume that they'll be recycled at the landfill and before they get in the river, lake or ocean. Let's not kid ourselves, we can all do our part.

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Response to douglas9 (Original post)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 06:58 PM

8. Ten cents deposit on each, here in Oregon.

The world needs to find a way to utilize the emptys on a massive scale.
Like plastic shipping containers.
Non load bearing walls.
Light weight 'skins' over skeletal structures.

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