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Mon Jun 19, 2017, 09:40 AM

How a math formula could decide fate of endangered U.S. species

Source: Reuters

ENVIRONMENT | Mon Jun 19, 2017 | 7:17am EDT

How a math formula could decide fate of endangered U.S. species

By Sharon Bernstein

The Trump administration is considering a proposal that could effectively let some plants and animals become extinct so cash-strapped agencies can use more of their funds to save others.

At a closed-door meeting last month, Arizona State University ecologist Leah Gerber presented a plan to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials that would use a mathematical formula to direct government money away from endangered and threatened species she calls "over-funded failures" and toward plants and animals that can more easily be saved.

Gavin Shire, a spokesman for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, said in an email to Reuters that the agency is examining the controversial proposal.

"We have worked closely with this group of scientists as they developed this new conservation tool, and while we have not made any determinations yet, are impressed with its potential," Shire said. "We will be exploring further if and how we may best use it to improve the effectiveness of our recovery efforts."

Gerber's May 5 meeting with administration officials and their stated interest in her proposal have not been previously reported. The agency would not comment further.

-snip-

Read more: http://www.reuters.com/article/us-endangered-species-triage-idUSKBN19A1DK

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Reply How a math formula could decide fate of endangered U.S. species (Original post)
Eugene Jun 19 OP
raging moderate Jun 19 #1

Response to Eugene (Original post)

Mon Jun 19, 2017, 09:57 AM

1. 23 known whooping cranes in 1941. Now 603.

Beautiful birds.

I am glad we helped them.

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