Welcome to DU! The truly grassroots left-of-center political community where regular people, not algorithms, drive the discussions and set the standards. Join the community: Create a free account Support DU (and get rid of ads!): Become a Star Member Latest Breaking News Editorials & Other Articles General Discussion The DU Lounge All Forums Issue Forums Culture Forums Alliance Forums Region Forums Support Forums Help & Search

RandySF

(62,999 posts)
Fri Dec 5, 2014, 12:27 PM Dec 2014

I'm hearing the same thing over and over: Statewide anti-bullying programs are a joke.

I've been hearing it in California and I heard it a couple of months ago in Michigan. Local school districts are not implementing statewide anti-bullying policies. As a matter of fact, there is a boy playing 7th grade basketball for my son's school even though he attends the middle school across the street. Bullying from teammates was so bad he walked over and begged to play for us. He's a great kid and we're happy to have him, but I thought that, even though public schools are stuck with bad kids, sports participation is still supposed to be a privilege. I guess we have a long way to go.

7 replies = new reply since forum marked as read
Highlight: NoneDon't highlight anything 5 newestHighlight 5 most recent replies
I'm hearing the same thing over and over: Statewide anti-bullying programs are a joke. (Original Post) RandySF Dec 2014 OP
I just watched the movie Bully kimbutgar Dec 2014 #1
I don't know about California...but it's difficult.. Sancho Dec 2014 #2
The thing I noticed in our district was the lack of continuity. femmocrat Dec 2014 #3
Trickle down from the 'culture of compliance' that typifies most schools these days, I'll wager. Smarmie Doofus Dec 2014 #4
I'm sorry, I don't agree with your last paragraph AwakeAtLast Dec 2014 #5
It goes without saying that admins are focused on keeping out of trouble. Smarmie Doofus Dec 2014 #6
Re: lenrely Dec 2014 #7

kimbutgar

(21,924 posts)
1. I just watched the movie Bully
Fri Dec 5, 2014, 12:47 PM
Dec 2014

And was in tears after watching it. I live in SF and substitute teach, when I have lunch and yard duty I step in when I see bullying and confront the bullies and ask them why are they bothering this kid? The bully usually walks away from me not saying a word. I then make sure to focus on the bullied kid the rest of recess and try to talk with them.

Sancho

(9,073 posts)
2. I don't know about California...but it's difficult..
Fri Dec 5, 2014, 12:56 PM
Dec 2014

here in Florida there are statewide statutes and schools try to implement policies. It's hard to legally define bullying. Recognizing bullying takes lawyers, evidence, and practical punishment.

Without getting into a bunch of examples, some schools and districts have tried and the details are not worked out to make enforcement easily possible.


You see a lot of programming to prevent bullying, lots of attempts to get kids to report, and some mediation/problem solving skill building. Enforcing a policy with expulsion or suspension or whatever you think is possible is quite hard without repeated evidence against the bully. Also, if the bully carry on outside of school on the internet or in the neighborhood the school may not have a way to do anything. Local police won't respond often to a report on bullying unless it's clearly a crime that physical or stealing.

femmocrat

(28,394 posts)
3. The thing I noticed in our district was the lack of continuity.
Fri Dec 5, 2014, 03:03 PM
Dec 2014

Every so often we would have a program, assembly, or whatever, about bullying. Everyone gets all enthusiastic over "Be a buddy, not a bully." Kids are given stickers and pencils and have a poster or essay contest.... or something. Two weeks later it is forgotten and everyone goes back to their old behaviors.

Despite adults' efforts to moderate the behavior, it just seems to be ingrained in kids to have a pecking order. And a lot of it begins at home, IMO.

 

Smarmie Doofus

(14,498 posts)
4. Trickle down from the 'culture of compliance' that typifies most schools these days, I'll wager.
Fri Dec 5, 2014, 06:05 PM
Dec 2014

Politicians pass laws based on the most recent headlines so schools are swimming in mandates and directives about this, that and the other thing. Most of them impractical, many of them creating bigger problems than those they ostensibly address. My distinct impression is this: Everyone's just going through the motions. Again: a culture of compliance.

To actually combat bullying you need teachers that like kids and really want to BE THERE. That are INTO combating bullying. In other words, high quality teachers. The truth is it's getting harder and harder for people who feel this way about kids to stay in the system.

AwakeAtLast

(14,184 posts)
5. I'm sorry, I don't agree with your last paragraph
Sun Dec 7, 2014, 05:53 PM
Dec 2014

There are plenty of teachers who care, it is administators who time and time again drop the ball. Then they go after the teachers who report it - especially if the students play sports. I have seen it too many times.

Losing tenure will only make the problem worse because we will now fear losing our jobs for stepping in.

 

Smarmie Doofus

(14,498 posts)
6. It goes without saying that admins are focused on keeping out of trouble.
Tue Dec 9, 2014, 09:14 AM
Dec 2014

Pretty much exclusively. They're a different breed entirely and I wasn't talking about them.

But since you brought it up, I agree: they want this issue... it's really a constellation of a lot of issues.... to disappear when it surfaces and will just as soon blame the messenger ( usually the teacher) as not. ( There are, of course, exceptions to this rule.)

Also... no one's more pro-teacher tenure than I, though it ( tenure) really is highly overrated. There are all sorts of ways to create a hostile work environment sufficient to make people ( teachers) change buildings and even professions. Tenure's not going to help much in these cases.

Tenure helps people who REALLY want to hang on to.... well... hang on. But it makes sense that people with other professional options are going to reconsider teaching when they experience the day-to-day reality of what it ( teaching) has become.

lenrely

(13 posts)
7. Re:
Wed Dec 17, 2014, 01:33 AM
Dec 2014

It's amazing that even athletes aren't exempt from this. The reason programs are a joke is that when adults try to interject themselves into student problems it's a joke. " target="_blank">

Latest Discussions»Issue Forums»Education»I'm hearing the same thin...