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Thu Sep 5, 2019, 09:47 AM

Survey: Businesses added a solid 195,000 jobs in August


Survey: Businesses added a solid 195,000 jobs in August
By CHRISTOPHER RUGABER
an hour ago

In this Aug. 15, 2019, photo a "Now hiring" sign is displayed on the front door of a Staples store in Manchester, N.H. On Thursday, Sept. 5, payroll processor ADP reports how many jobs private employers added in August. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. businesses added a healthy 195,000 jobs last month, a sign companies are still hiring at a solid pace despite the Trump administration’s trade war with China.

Payroll processor ADP said Thursday that hiring occurred broadly among small, medium-sized and large businesses, compared with recent months when large firms had dominated. Health care, restaurants and hotels, and professional services all added jobs at a robust pace. Manufacturing added 8,000, despite other data that shows factory output is contracting.

https://www.apnews.com/530bc04c07c44c928256f82e89ce5b9e

I am noticing small businesses here south of Jacksonville, FL have lots of new employees.
But I miss the seasoned and experienced older employees.

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Response to at140 (Original post)

Thu Sep 5, 2019, 09:58 AM

1. Good morning. Thanks for the thread. Links to earlier reports:

[center]Past Performance is Not a Guarantee of Future Results.[/center]

Nonetheless, what is important is not this month's results, but the trend. Let’s look at some earlier numbers:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in July 2019:

U.S. Added 164,000 Jobs in July; Unemployment Rate at 3.7 Percent

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in July 2019:

ADP says 156,000 private-sector jobs added created in July

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in June 2019:

Hiring rebounds as U.S. economy adds 224,000 jobs in June;unemployment rate inched up to 3.7 percent

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in June 2019:

U.S. private sector hiring picks up less than expected in June: ADP

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in May 2019:

The U.S. economy added only 75,000 jobs in May amid bite from Trump's trade war

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in May 2019:

ADP private-sector job growth tumbles to a 9-year low in May

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in April 2019:

UPDATE: U.S. unemployment fell to 3.6 percent, lowest since 1969

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in April 2019:

ADP National Employment Report: Private Sector Employment Increased by 275,000 Jobs in April

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in March 2019:

UPDATE: U.S. added 196,000 jobs in March as economy shows signs of spring bounce

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in March 2019:

Private sector hiring falls to 18-month low, and manufacturing sheds jobs, ADP says

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in February 2019:

U.S. adds meager 20,000 jobs in February to mark smallest increase in 17 months

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in February 2019:

ADP National Employment Report: Private Sector Employment Increased by 183,000 Jobs in February

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in January 2019:

U.S. creates 304,000 jobs in January, unemployment rises to 4%

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in January 2019:

U.S. added 213,000 private-sector jobs in January, ADP says

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in December 2018:

Payroll employment increases by 312,000 in December; unemployment rate rises to 3.9%

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in December 2018:

U.S. adds most private-sector jobs in almost 2 years, says ADP

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in November 2018:

Payroll employment increases by 155,000 in November; unemployment rate unchanged at 3.7%

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in November 2018:

U.S. adds 179,000 private-sector jobs in November: ADP

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in October 2018:

The U.S. economy added 250,000 jobs in October, unemployment stays at 3.7 percent

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in October 2018:

ADP National Employment Report: Private Sector Employment Increased by 227,000 Jobs in October 2018:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in September 2018:

Unemployment rate declines to 3.7% in September; payroll employment increases by 134,000

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in September 2018:

U.S. adds 230,000 private-sector jobs in September: ADP

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in August 2018:

U.S. Added 201,000 Jobs in August; Unemployment Rate Steady at 3.9%

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in August 2018:

U.S. Firms in August Added Fewest Workers in 10 Months, ADP Says

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in July 2018:

Payroll employment increases by 157,000 in July; unemployment rate edges down to 3.9%

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in July 2018:

ADP National Employment Report: Private Sector Employment Increased by 219,000 Jobs in July

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in June 2018:

U.S. Added 213,000 Jobs in June; Unemployment Ticks Up to 4%

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in June 2018:

ADP National Employment Report: Private Sector Employment Increased by 177,000 Jobs in June

Bureau of Labor Statistics, for employment in May 2018:

U.S. economy extends its hiring spree, with a better than expected 223,000 new jobs in May

ADP[sup]®[/sup] (Automatic Data Processing), for employment in April 2018:

U.S. adds 204,000 private-sector jobs in April, ADP report shows

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Response to mahatmakanejeeves (Reply #1)

Thu Sep 5, 2019, 10:24 AM

2. But the shocking revision of MINUS half a million jobs

by bureau of labor stats recently, was indeed shocking, to me anyways.
Need better modelling and better extrapolation.

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Response to at140 (Reply #2)

Thu Sep 5, 2019, 10:35 AM

3. I made a post about the revision in BumRushDaShow's thread about BLS's July jobs report,

so people can refer to this when they look up the employment news.

One-stop shopping:

From August 21, 2019. Adding to this thread: Announcement 2019 CES Preliminary Benchmark Revision

Announcement 2019 CES Preliminary Benchmark Revision

Current Employment Statistics - CES (National)

CES Preliminary Benchmark Announcement

In accordance with usual practice, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) is announcing the preliminary estimate of the upcoming annual benchmark revision to the establishment survey employment series. The final benchmark revision will be issued in February 2020 with the publication of the January 2020 Employment Situation news release.

Each year, the Current Employment Statistics (CES) survey employment estimates are benchmarked to comprehensive counts of employment for the month of March. These counts are derived from state unemployment insurance (UI) tax records that nearly all employers are required to file. For national CES employment series, the annual benchmark revisions over the last 10 years have averaged plus or minus two-tenths of one percent of total nonfarm employment. The preliminary estimate of the benchmark revision indicates a downward adjustment to March 2019 total nonfarm employment of -501,000 (-0.3 percent).

Preliminary benchmark revisions are calculated only for the month of March 2019 for the major industry sectors in table 1. The existing employment series are not updated with the release of the preliminary benchmark estimate. The data for all CES series will be updated when the final benchmark revision is issued.

Table 1 shows the March 2019 preliminary benchmark revisions by major industry sector. As is typically the case, many of the individual industry series show larger percentage revisions than the total nonfarm series, primarily because statistical sampling error is greater at more detailed levels than at an aggregated level.

{snip the charts}

Last Modified Date: August 21, 2019

{more editing:}

Start here to see the archival data: Current Employment Statistics - CES (National)

Go over to the left hand side of the page. There's a column of topics. Go down the column:

BROWSE CES

SEARCH CES

CES TOPICS

Under CES TOPICS, click on BENCHMARK.

You'll go to Current Employment Statistics - CES (National) Tables Created by BLS - Benchmark Information

In that category, click on Archived Benchmark Articles

They have .pdfs going back to March 2002.

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Response to at140 (Original post)

Thu Sep 5, 2019, 11:56 AM

4. And with our 2.9% raise this year, we may have the same buying power as in the 1970s

Yeah jobs are up but now your family needs 2 to 4 of them to make ends meet. And even with those jobs, your wages won't be able to buy what you could buy in the 1970.

Yeah for a functioning economy

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Response to Farmer-Rick (Reply #4)

Sat Sep 7, 2019, 03:28 PM

6. in 1970, we had little competition from China, India & other 3rd world

countries. Now China & India can manufacture anything we can. We were a exporting nation.
Now we are a importing nation, competing with lower wage countries. Life is tough now.

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Response to at140 (Reply #6)

Sun Sep 8, 2019, 09:10 AM

7. Yup

But why did we let this happen? We did not need to allow foreign countries that sanction things like child labor, slave labor, forced labor and prison labor to compete into our US markets. Why do we allow farm products from foreign countries that frequently use illegal cheap pesticides, additives and feeds that our farmers can not use?

Our country maintains roads, legal systems, communication systems, contract enforcement laws, energy distribution, waste disposal and sanitary conditions. These all cost money. These thing often done in partnership with for profit corporation are considered government functions. Why do we allow foreign corporations to use this infrastructure for free by letting them into our markets? Why do we give tax deductions to corporations for moving production to foreign countries?

Why do we allow competition in our costly market infrastructure with countries that use unethical and illegal labor and environmental systems?

Someone has made big bucks off of this unfair system. Traitor Trump and his Slovenian sex worker aren't the only grifters ruining our country.



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Response to Farmer-Rick (Reply #7)

Sun Sep 8, 2019, 11:17 AM

8. From first hand knowledge, I can tell you who sold out American workers

It is the big corporations in America. They moved manufacturing jobs to cheap labor countries to maximize bottom line profits. The outfit I worked for 23 years sold it's engineering & manufacturing know-how and experience gained over 75 years to collaborate with Chinese and move manufacturing operations to China.

Guess what? It is all legal.

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Response to at140 (Original post)

Sat Sep 7, 2019, 03:23 PM

5. ADP National Employment Report: Private Sector Employment Increased by 195,000 Jobs in August

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