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Sun Feb 23, 2014, 09:26 AM

MRA or feminist: Who said it?

"We have many wonderful, clever, powerful women everywhere, but what is happening to men? Why did this have to be at the cost of men?

"I was in a class of nine- and 10-year-olds, girls and boys, and this young woman was telling these kids that the reason for wars was the innately violent nature of men.

"You could see the little girls, fat with complacency and conceit while the little boys sat there crumpled, apologizing for their existence, thinking this was going to be the pattern of their lives."

"It is time we began to ask who are these women who continually rubbish men. The most stupid, ill-educated and nasty woman can rubbish the nicest, kindest and most intelligent man and no one protests."

"Men seem to be so cowed that they can't fight back, and it is time they did."

8 replies, 2854 views

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Reply MRA or feminist: Who said it? (Original post)
Major Nikon Feb 2014 OP
Smarmie Doofus Feb 2014 #1
TM99 Feb 2014 #2
In_The_Wind Feb 2014 #3
Major Nikon Feb 2014 #4
sibelian Feb 2014 #7
YoungDemCA Feb 2014 #5
Major Nikon Feb 2014 #6
CTyankee Aug 2014 #8

Response to Major Nikon (Original post)

Sun Feb 23, 2014, 09:31 AM

1. Wild guess:

 

Christina Hoff Summers?

On second thought... sounds British:"...." these women who continually rubbish men."

I'll go w. Germaine Greer.

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Response to Major Nikon (Original post)

Sun Feb 23, 2014, 09:36 AM

2. Doris Lessing,

 

whose Canopus in Argos sci-fi series still ranks as one of my top 5 from the greats of my childhood years.

An equalitist of high respect, if I ever saw one.

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Response to TM99 (Reply #2)

Sun Feb 23, 2014, 09:41 AM

3. I'll look for her books on my next visit to a library.

Thanks

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Response to In_The_Wind (Reply #3)

Sun Feb 23, 2014, 10:17 AM

4. You can read her Nobel prize winning novel in digital form

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Response to In_The_Wind (Reply #3)

Wed Feb 26, 2014, 05:57 AM

7. I've often considered "The Fifth Child" to be her greatest.


It's a sort of bizarre domestic horror story about a male child being born to a comfortable middle class family, not fitting in and slowly destroying them and being destroyed.

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Response to Major Nikon (Original post)

Sun Feb 23, 2014, 10:26 PM

5. Context for the quotes please.

 

nt

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Response to YoungDemCA (Reply #5)

Mon Feb 24, 2014, 10:50 AM

6. ...

[font color=black size=4 face="face"]Lay off men, Lessing tells feminists
Novelist condemns female culture that revels in humiliating other sex[/font]

Special report: Edinburgh books festival 2001
Fiachra Gibbons, arts correspondent

The Guardian, Monday 13 August 2001

The novelist Doris Lessing yesterday claimed that men were the new silent victims in the sex war, "continually demeaned and insulted" by women without a whimper of protest.
Lessing, who became a feminist icon with the books The Grass is Singing and The Golden Notebook, said a "lazy and insidious" culture had taken hold within feminism that revelled in flailing men.

Young boys were being weighed down with guilt about the crimes of their sex, she told the Edinburgh book festival, while energy which could be used to get proper child care was being dissipated in the pointless humiliation of men.

"I find myself increasingly shocked at the unthinking and automatic rubbishing of men which is now so part of our culture that it is hardly even noticed," the 81-year-old Persian-born writer said yesterday.

http://www.theguardian.com/uk/2001/aug/14/edinburghfestival2001.edinburghbookfestival2001

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #6)

Wed Aug 6, 2014, 01:24 PM

8. Well, she certainly was a product of her time in society...she was 86 in 2001...

I don't know a feminist woman today who would really talk like that.

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