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Mon Sep 9, 2019, 07:22 PM

PM Johnson: I will not ask for Brexit delay

LONDON (Reuters) - Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Monday he would not request an extension to Brexit, hours after a law came into force demanding he delay Britainís departure from the European Union until 2020 unless he can strike a divorce deal.

Johnson appeared to have lost control of Britainís withdrawal from the European Union with the approval of the law, which obliges him to seek a delay unless he can strike a new deal at an EU summit next month. EU leaders have repeatedly said they have not received specific proposals...

https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-britain-eu/pm-johnson-i-will-not-ask-for-brexit-delay-idUKKCN1VU0P3

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Reply PM Johnson: I will not ask for Brexit delay (Original post)
Ghost Dog Sep 2019 OP
asiliveandbreathe Sep 2019 #1
flotsam Sep 2019 #2
Matilda Sep 2019 #3
muriel_volestrangler Sep 2019 #4
Denzil_DC Sep 2019 #5

Response to Ghost Dog (Original post)

Mon Sep 9, 2019, 07:36 PM

1. BJ is pissed..he lost again...no general election...n/t

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Response to Ghost Dog (Original post)

Mon Sep 9, 2019, 07:50 PM

2. Bojo the Clown...N/T

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Response to Ghost Dog (Original post)

Mon Sep 9, 2019, 09:42 PM

3. This is hard to figure out.

Why is the PM so set on a no-deal exit?

It's obvious that he's lying about his deal negotiations, because Europe knows nothing about it. But I don't understand why he thinks that would be preferable to a new deal. Is it just that he has no idea what to do? Or is it that he really isn't interested because all he wants is to be leader, come what may?

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Response to Matilda (Reply #3)

Tue Sep 10, 2019, 05:23 AM

4. That's the only way he'll get re-elected

Any new deal couldn't be that different from what May and the EU worked out, unless you have a hard border in Ireland, which breaks the Good Friday agreement. The extreme Brexiteers will vote for Farage unless they get No Deal (or a magic unicorn 'free-trade with any country, no border checks with Ireland' deal which would stop the EU being able to set its own trade deals).

But yes, all he wants is to be leader.

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Response to Matilda (Reply #3)

Tue Sep 10, 2019, 07:38 AM

5. No deal has become the Brexiters' favoured default by creeping attrition over the last year or so.

It was never a plank during the referendum, when there were repeated assurances that the UK would have an EFTA or similar deal and an orderly, planned withdrawal.

Part of that is because ever since the referendum, every time they've tried to nail down what Brexit actually means in the real world (as May eventually very belated did at the infamous Cabinet retreat at Chequers that led to Johnson and a few others quickly bailing after initially supporting her proposals), it's highlighted how unrealistic and unworkable their plans are and worsened the splits among the pro-Brexit ranks. "No deal" and "WTO Brexit" sound simple and catchy, and are an easy sell to the headbanger rubes.

Any deal short of full EU membership would mean the UK becoming a rule taker rather than having a voice in shaping EU policy and regulations. That was obvious from the start to many of us, but seems to have been slow to dawn on them.

So "no deal" has become the favoured slogan, as if resorting to the mythical WTO trade terms means that the UK wouldn't still have to strike trade deals with the EU in future, but from a far weaker bargaining position, while trying to satisfy the likes of the Trump administration, which is salivating at the prospect of easy pickings.

There's also the factor of EU regulations governing cross-border money laundering and tax havens, which come fully into effect in January next year. Currently, those regulations have become part of UK law, as they had to while the UK was an EU member, and May indicated before her resignation that there were no plans to repeal them. Whether you believed her or not about that, in a Johnson regime, all bets have to be off. Regulatory convergence on such issues is likely to be a key part of any future negotiations with the EU, to avoid the UK undercutting the EU partners, so an ultra-hard "no deal" Brexit is appealing to the big financial players (including some in the Tory Party and Cabinet) who back Brexit.

Also, the more future chaos the better for those who play the money markets - for short-term gain through shorting etc., and because it clears the field for a nice spot of disaster capitalism. For the likes of Dominic Cummings - who's a libertarian in the free market sense and thinks government, and especially the civil service, are long overdue for some culling coupled with a major restructuring of UK society along populist lines - it's an opportunity to set the stage for changes and some sort of revolution I doubt he's even properly thought through himself. But he's going to be alright, having married into the minor landed gentry, so that's nice.

Your final question also highlights a significant factor.

Johnson has built a career on winging it in a grossly irresponsible fashion and never fully reaping the consequences of his cock-ups, and has a massive sense of entitlement and delusions of adequacy. A few years ago, I remember reading an article warning of the consequences if ex-newspaper columnists like Johnson and Gove (let's not grant them the dignity of calling them journalists) got hold of the reins of power. They could make grandiose, sweeping, ill thought out declarations in a column one week, then directly contradict themselves next week if they felt like it, with no serious repercussions. As a journalist, he was sacked twice for lying (lying's a way of life for him, but on those two occasions he overstepped the mark), but still walked into cushy jobs each time. If and when he loses his current job, that pattern will no doubt continue.

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