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Wed Aug 6, 2014, 10:49 AM

 

Drought-tolerant Yards can be Free with Rebate

LOS ANGELES (KABC)
Winnetka homeowner Cherry Cordero recently decided it was time to get rid of the thirsty grass on her yard and save water with new drought-tolerant plants instead. But the real beauty of her new drought-tolerant front yard was that none of the work cost her a dime.

Because California is in the midst of a water crisis, local water agencies are offering homeowners rebates up to $3 a square foot for removing water guzzling turf and replacing it with plants and mulch that use much less of our precious resource.

Another great feature of this type of landscaping is all of the irrigation is underground. With traditional sprinklers, there's a lot of evaporation in hot and windy conditions, which costs you money.

"A study of the city of Santa Monica and Santa Monica colleges says that for a 2,000-square-foot yard that's green and lush and has proper upkeep, switching that with drought-tolerant landscape...can save up to $2,200 in a given year," said Farrell.

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Reply Drought-tolerant Yards can be Free with Rebate (Original post)
antiquie Aug 2014 OP
NYC_SKP Aug 2014 #1
Cleita Aug 2014 #5
NYC_SKP Aug 2014 #7
Cleita Aug 2014 #8
eppur_se_muova Aug 2014 #2
antiquie Aug 2014 #3
Cleita Aug 2014 #4
historylovr Aug 2014 #6
AndyTiedye Aug 2014 #9
antiquie Aug 2014 #10

Response to antiquie (Original post)

Wed Aug 6, 2014, 11:22 AM

1. Excellent. Eventually, we'll have to outlaw lawns altogether.

 

And we'll have to outlaw HOAs that require owners maintain water-intensive landscaping.

If one lives in an area where grass grows naturally, then fine. But anything that requires use of the domestic drinking water supply has got to go away.

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Response to NYC_SKP (Reply #1)

Wed Aug 6, 2014, 12:03 PM

5. I never had a lawn. I find planting natives and other drought tolerant

bushes and plants much more attractive. However even drought tolerant requires water when extra dryness and heat are present. I try to keep my watering to once a month, but climate conditions often make that once a week and in especially dry, hot weather, it might even be more often. I'm almost considering going to succulents. That's how hard it's been in the past few years to maintain an attractive garden.

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Response to Cleita (Reply #5)

Wed Aug 6, 2014, 01:27 PM

7. My current place is on 1/3 acre, I water nothing except one Loquat tree, some tomatoes, and...

 

...one table top of succulents and an Elkhorn fern.

I'm moving to a small place on the coast where I've got no ground but a few potted plants, mostly succulents, and these get most of their water from the seaside air.

I love it!

I needed a potted something for my entry and the local independent nursery created this from my selections:



If anything, it takes a cup of water every two weeks.

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Response to NYC_SKP (Reply #7)

Wed Aug 6, 2014, 02:51 PM

8. Beautiful arrangement.

I'm going to make a patio out of a lot of my yard to put similar container plants on, which should cut down watering needs a lot.

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Response to antiquie (Original post)

Wed Aug 6, 2014, 11:23 AM

2. Google "xeriscaping" for more info on no-water landscaping --

Greek ξερός, meaning "dry", is the root of xerography ("dry writing" and hence of Xerox. Poetry fans can use the word sere as a mnemonic aid, although there's no etymological connection.

Posted because this is a hard word to remember ...

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Response to eppur_se_muova (Reply #2)

Wed Aug 6, 2014, 11:35 AM

3. Google again with your city name

 

to find out if rebates or free plants are offered.

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Response to antiquie (Original post)

Wed Aug 6, 2014, 11:56 AM

4. Something to think about.

My "underground irrigation" or in my case soaker hoses in my drought tolerant garden, keep getting chewed through by critters looking for water. I do put containers of water out for them, but the expense of replacing the hoses has forced me to go back to using sprinklers.

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Response to antiquie (Original post)

Wed Aug 6, 2014, 01:17 PM

6. This is a wonderful idea.nt

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Response to antiquie (Original post)

Wed Aug 6, 2014, 03:46 PM

9. The Vegetable Garden is Gradually Taking Over the Yard

What grass there is only gets watered by the fog.

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Response to AndyTiedye (Reply #9)

Wed Aug 6, 2014, 03:49 PM

10. Excellent.

 

We have low-maintenance plants in front and vegies, citrus and bananas in the back.

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