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Thu Sep 4, 2014, 07:31 AM

 

Use the computer can of air to de-dust the small apeture of a lens?

Last edited Thu Sep 4, 2014, 08:09 PM - Edit history (3)

Good or bad idea

10 replies, 2104 views

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Arrow 10 replies Author Time Post
Reply Use the computer can of air to de-dust the small apeture of a lens? (Original post)
Hoppy Sep 2014 OP
Nitram Sep 2014 #1
ManiacJoe Sep 2014 #2
Major Nikon Sep 2014 #3
ManiacJoe Sep 2014 #8
Major Nikon Sep 2014 #4
Hoppy Sep 2014 #5
Sherman A1 Sep 2014 #6
alfredo Sep 2014 #7
sir pball Sep 2014 #9
JohnnyRingo Sep 2014 #10

Response to Hoppy (Original post)

Thu Sep 4, 2014, 09:26 AM

1. I believe the pressure of canneed air can pit or scar a lens

or damage the coating at the very least. The pressure can grind small dust particles into the lens rather than removing them.

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Response to Hoppy (Original post)

Thu Sep 4, 2014, 11:47 AM

2. Not sure what you mean by

"small aperture of a lens".

However, the cans of "compressed air" contain a lot of other things besides air that you normally do not want in your camera equipment.

A "rocket blower" would be a better option.

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Response to ManiacJoe (Reply #2)

Thu Sep 4, 2014, 01:30 PM

3. Aperture literally means opening

The side that faces the camera is smaller than the business end, so I assume the OP meant the camera side of the lens.

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #3)

Thu Sep 4, 2014, 08:26 PM

8. That was my guess, too.

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Response to Hoppy (Original post)

Thu Sep 4, 2014, 01:35 PM

4. You can, but it's not the best idea

There's a few problems using compressed air cans. Air from these cans comes out in a relatively high volume, which means you're going to build up a static charge which will attract dust. The air is also relatively cold and more so the longer you spray which will cause condensation and attract even more dust.

The best thing to use is a bulb type blower and if that doesn't work use a soft bristled brush designed for that purpose.

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Response to Hoppy (Original post)

Thu Sep 4, 2014, 01:51 PM

5. I guess that answers it.

 

Thanx.

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Response to Hoppy (Original post)

Thu Sep 4, 2014, 04:37 PM

6. Not something I would do

Get one of those bulb air blowers online or at your local camera store.

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Response to Hoppy (Original post)

Thu Sep 4, 2014, 06:54 PM

7. It might put some oils onto the glass. Use a blower like

Giottos AA1900 Rocket Air Blaster


Fototech makes a good blower too.

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Response to Hoppy (Original post)

Fri Sep 5, 2014, 11:43 AM

9. No!

I would never use canned air on my gear - besides the pressure bending the diaphragm leaves or worse, it's going to drive any dust deeper into the lens instead of extracting it, roughening up the mechanism or worse getting on the internal optics. Vacuuming is a much better option...I'm a little reckless (well, a lot...I cleaned the sensor on my D70 by shoving the hose in the lens mount hole) so I just use the upholstery brush attachment on a regular vac, but if you're picky you can get a specialized electronics vac on Amazon.

That being said, the Rocket alfredo mentioned above is useful as all getout to have around, it won't actually pull dust away like a vac but you can puff as delicately as you need to knock pesky grains off of sensors and whatnot. Or go really oldschool and get a camel hair brush..

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Response to Hoppy (Original post)

Wed Sep 10, 2014, 11:39 PM

10. With my luck I'd blow dust into the camera.

I understand dust on the sensor is bad news.
I've never heard of anyone trying that. Good luck.

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