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Mon Apr 12, 2021, 01:06 PM

and you thought hybrids are a new idea. wrrooonnng.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Owen_Magnetic

3 replies, 319 views

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Reply and you thought hybrids are a new idea. wrrooonnng. (Original post)
AllaN01Bear Apr 12 OP
Fla Dem Apr 12 #1
mahatmakanejeeves Apr 12 #2
hunter Apr 12 #3

Response to AllaN01Bear (Original post)

Mon Apr 12, 2021, 01:45 PM

1. Very interesting.

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Response to AllaN01Bear (Original post)

Mon Apr 12, 2021, 02:27 PM

2. Wind power AND coal

SS Great Eastern


Great Eastern at Heart's Content after laying the first transatlantic cable, July 1866

SS Great Eastern was an iron sailing steamship designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, and built by J. Scott Russell & Co. at Millwall Iron Works on the River Thames, London. She was by far the largest ship ever built at the time of her 1858 launch, and had the capacity to carry 4,000 passengers from England to Australia without refuelling. Her length of 692 feet (211 m) was only surpassed in 1899 by the 705-foot (215 m) 17,274-gross-ton RMS Oceanic, her gross tonnage of 18,915 was only surpassed in 1901 by the 701-foot (214 m) 21,035-gross-ton RMS Celtic, and her 4,000-passenger capacity was surpassed in 1913 by the 4,935-passenger SS Imperator. The ship's five funnels were rare and were later reduced to four. The vessel also had the largest set of paddle wheels.

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The famous photograph by Robert Howlett of Brunel before the ship's launching chains

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18541859: Construction to maiden voyage

Construction


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The hull was an all-iron construction, a double hull of 19-millimetre (0.75 in) wrought iron in 0.86 m (2 ft 10 in) plates with ribs every 1.8 m (5 ft 11 in). Internally the hull was divided by two 107 m (351 ft 1 in) long, 18 m (59 ft 1 in) high, longitudinal bulkheads and further transverse bulkheads dividing the ship into nineteen compartments. The Great Eastern was the first ship to incorporate the double-skinned hull, a feature which would not be seen again in a ship for 100 years, but which is now compulsory for reasons of safety. She had sail, paddle and screw propulsion. The paddle-wheels were 17 m (55 ft 9 in) in diameter and the four-bladed screw-propeller was 7.3 m (23 ft 11 in) across. The power came from four steam engines for the paddles and an additional engine for the propeller. Total power was estimated at 6,000 kilowatts (8,000 hp). She had six masts (said to be named after the days of a week - Monday being the fore mast and Saturday the spanker mast), providing space for 1,686 square metres (18,150 sq ft) of sails (7 gaff and maximum 9 (usually 4) square sails), rigged similar to a topsail schooner with a main gaff sail (fore-and-aft sail) on each mast, one "jib" on the fore mast and three square sails on masts no. 2 and no. 3 (Tuesday & Wednesday); for a time mast no. 4 was also fitted with 3 yards. In later years, some of the yards were removed. According to some sources she would have carried 5,435 m2 (58,500 sq ft). This amount of canvas is obviously too much for seven fore-and-aft sails and maximum 9 square sails. This (larger) figure of sail area lies only a few square meters below that the famous Flying P-Liner Preussen carried - with her five full-rigged masts of 30 square sails and a lot of stay sails. Setting sails turned out to be unusable at the same time as the paddles and screw were under steam, because the hot exhaust from the five (later four) funnels would set them on fire. Her maximum speed was 13 knots (24 km/h; 15 mph).

{snip}

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Response to AllaN01Bear (Original post)

Mon Apr 12, 2021, 04:25 PM

3. That was interesting.

The modern upgrades were just right, not too much, not too little.





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