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Sun Mar 29, 2020, 04:47 PM

What is your favorite dog breed and why?

Mine is border collies, based on one I had many years ago, named Laddie. He was not pedigreed (none of my pets have been), so he might have had another breed in his family tree somewhere, but he looked pure border collie. Got him from the Humane Society when he was 2 months old. He was tri-colored, white, black, and a rich sable color.

The best all around dog I ever knew. Protective, playful, excellent hunting instincts without any training, well mannered and rule-abiding, very intelligent, huge vocabulary, and able to make his own judgments about danger. (I never let my husband take him hunting bc I feared a stupid hunter would shoot him for a fox).

Most memorable and amazing thing that Laddie did. We were at a public park on the Lake Erie shore next to the mouth of a large creek that empties into the lake. It was early spring. The creek was just stocked with coho salmon and several fishermen were checking it out, tossing Velveeta cheese to watch the fish jump.

We were chatting with a young couple who had their 18 month old daughter with them. I had Laddie on a leash. None of us, except Laddie, noticed the girl wander toward the creek bank, which had a 30 foot drop and strong undertow from the lake.

Laddie barked so ferociously, while tugging HARD on the leash, that I looked to see why. None of us could have reached the child in time. Intuituvely I understood Laddie's intent and dropped the leash. He raced to the girl, knocked her down, and sat on her until her father reached her. Meantime, the mother was screaming in fear.

When the father picked up his daughter, Laddie trotted back to me. The father offered us $50 for saving his child. We said the dog did it, not us. He said, "But you gave the command." I told him that I said nothing, just let go so Laddie could do his thing, and that Laddie was not a trained rescue dog, only a pet.

The father could not believe that an untrained dog would recognize the danger and take action on his own. But, border collies are instinctively herding dogs. Laddie saw a young "human lamb" going astray and went after her.

I have had other dogs that I cherished, but Laddie has always remained my favorite.

142 replies, 2604 views

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Reply What is your favorite dog breed and why? (Original post)
wnylib Mar 2020 OP
Skittles Mar 2020 #1
mnhtnbb Mar 2020 #98
yankeepants Mar 2020 #132
Skittles Mar 2020 #137
DonaldsRump Mar 2020 #2
dem4decades Mar 2020 #3
Funtatlaguy Mar 2020 #10
dem4decades Mar 2020 #15
nocoincidences Mar 2020 #4
wnylib Mar 2020 #16
Major Nikon Mar 2020 #97
wnylib Mar 2020 #103
Raastan Mar 2020 #41
marked50 Mar 2020 #52
leftieNanner Mar 2020 #5
dem4decades Mar 2020 #18
wnylib Mar 2020 #19
mr_lebowski Mar 2020 #6
ZZenith Mar 2020 #7
Cousin Dupree Mar 2020 #8
yellowdogintexas Mar 2020 #43
Upthevibe Mar 2020 #119
at140 Mar 2020 #9
OregonBlue Mar 2020 #11
Midnight Writer Mar 2020 #28
OregonBlue Mar 2020 #102
SamKnause Mar 2020 #12
LW1977 Mar 2020 #13
pandr32 Mar 2020 #14
broiles Mar 2020 #21
pandr32 Mar 2020 #50
wnylib Mar 2020 #27
pandr32 Mar 2020 #56
wnylib Mar 2020 #65
pandr32 Mar 2020 #94
MissB Mar 2020 #17
GeorgeGist Mar 2020 #20
jberryhill Mar 2020 #30
smirkymonkey Mar 2020 #78
FoxNewsSucks Mar 2020 #22
ProfessorGAC Mar 2020 #23
SheltieLover Mar 2020 #24
wnylib Mar 2020 #32
SheltieLover Mar 2020 #33
TruckFump Mar 2020 #25
wnylib Mar 2020 #34
TruckFump Mar 2020 #36
SheltieLover Mar 2020 #26
wnylib Mar 2020 #38
SheltieLover Mar 2020 #39
lisa58 Mar 2020 #29
wnylib Mar 2020 #40
lisa58 Mar 2020 #42
wnylib Mar 2020 #53
lisa58 Mar 2020 #55
Bmoboy Mar 2020 #31
Worried senior Mar 2020 #35
wnylib Mar 2020 #47
Ferrets are Cool Mar 2020 #37
duforsure Mar 2020 #79
wyldwolf Mar 2020 #44
jmowreader Mar 2020 #45
wnylib Mar 2020 #48
ms liberty Mar 2020 #46
wnylib Mar 2020 #49
Sancho Mar 2020 #51
JimGinPA Mar 2020 #54
Phentex Mar 2020 #57
smirkymonkey Apr 2020 #139
mdelaguna Mar 2020 #58
wnylib Mar 2020 #70
BBG Mar 2020 #59
OverBurn Mar 2020 #60
wnylib Mar 2020 #67
LakeArenal Mar 2020 #61
hangaleft Mar 2020 #82
LakeArenal Mar 2020 #92
Totally Tunsie Mar 2020 #112
LakeArenal Mar 2020 #115
Totally Tunsie Mar 2020 #121
LakeArenal Mar 2020 #136
pansypoo53219 Mar 2020 #62
rurallib Mar 2020 #63
Gothmog Mar 2020 #64
wnylib Mar 2020 #72
Gothmog Apr 2020 #138
wnylib Apr 2020 #141
Codeine Mar 2020 #66
IGoToDU Mar 2020 #68
wnylib Mar 2020 #73
Bayard Mar 2020 #69
wnylib Mar 2020 #74
elleng Mar 2020 #71
wnylib Mar 2020 #75
elleng Mar 2020 #76
bamagal62 Mar 2020 #77
wnylib Mar 2020 #87
BatteriesNotNeeded Mar 2020 #80
wnylib Mar 2020 #88
hangaleft Mar 2020 #81
mrs_p Mar 2020 #83
quickesst Mar 2020 #84
Bluethroughu Mar 2020 #85
wnylib Mar 2020 #89
Bluethroughu Mar 2020 #95
MrsMatt Mar 2020 #86
wnylib Mar 2020 #90
Major Nikon Mar 2020 #91
wnylib Mar 2020 #93
Major Nikon Mar 2020 #96
wnylib Mar 2020 #104
Major Nikon Mar 2020 #105
wnylib Mar 2020 #106
Major Nikon Mar 2020 #107
wnylib Mar 2020 #114
wnylib Mar 2020 #111
Major Nikon Mar 2020 #113
wnylib Mar 2020 #116
mnhtnbb Mar 2020 #99
MrScorpio Mar 2020 #100
wnylib Mar 2020 #118
OnDoutside Mar 2020 #101
blue neen Mar 2020 #108
wnylib Mar 2020 #117
Totally Tunsie Mar 2020 #109
wnylib Mar 2020 #120
Totally Tunsie Mar 2020 #124
smirkymonkey Apr 2020 #140
Upthevibe Mar 2020 #122
Totally Tunsie Mar 2020 #126
TexasBushwhacker Mar 2020 #110
wnylib Mar 2020 #125
smirkymonkey Mar 2020 #123
wnylib Mar 2020 #127
Doreen Mar 2020 #128
wnylib Mar 2020 #129
Doreen Mar 2020 #131
wnylib Mar 2020 #133
Doreen Mar 2020 #134
DanieRains Mar 2020 #130
Cicada Mar 2020 #135
Wolf Frankula Apr 2020 #142

Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 04:49 PM

1. border collies

they are the ones who can keep up with me (my step count indicates I walk between 7 and 8 miles a day)

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Response to Skittles (Reply #1)


Response to Skittles (Reply #1)

Tue Mar 31, 2020, 03:25 AM

132. Australian Cattle Dog. I am a professional trainer

I own a board and train facility and over the years have adopted 5 dogs from folks who found themselves in bad circumstances. Two of said dogs are Australian Cattle Dogs (Blue Heelers). They are purchased by well meaning people who don't know what it takes to live with a truly hard core working dog and end up in over their heads. I adore these dogs for their tenacity, devotion, problem-solving ability, athleticism, and sheer coolness. My other dogs are a Border Collie, Bischon mix, and a black lab. I love them all but the Heelers steal my heart.

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Response to yankeepants (Reply #132)

Tue Mar 31, 2020, 03:41 PM

137. very important for a pet to be a match for people

that's why I think reputable folk should always quiz someone on their lifestyle before letting them have a dog

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 04:49 PM

2. Mutts! n/t

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 04:52 PM

3. Goldens, because right now i have one on my lap and one at my feet

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Response to dem4decades (Reply #3)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 05:07 PM

10. Need pix.

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Response to Funtatlaguy (Reply #10)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 05:22 PM

15. Not sure how to do that here.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 04:55 PM

4. Australian Shepherds

I have had at least one since I was 24 years old.

For the same reason folks love Border Collies.

Aussies are so smart, so devoted, so protective...my last one died last year and he is still with me in my dreams.

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Response to nocoincidences (Reply #4)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 05:22 PM

16. I sometimes wondered if Laddie had

some Australian shepherd in his line bc he had a gentleness to him that I've heard is characteristic of them, along with the intelligence, herding instinct, loyalty, etc. Very similar breeds.

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Response to wnylib (Reply #16)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 04:11 PM

97. I have one of each

I've only had one Aussie so I can't make a determination on all of them. All I can say is the one I have isn't like any border collie I've ever had. She's definitely the most loyal dog. She spends all of her time next to me and never wants to go anywhere else. What's amazing is that until now I've always had at least two border collies and they never really got along all that well together. They would always play together, but outside of that they wanted little to do with each other. My Aussie gets along great with everyone, including other dogs. So they make a much better pair than trying to pair up two border collies. When my Aussie can't be around me, she's always next to my border collie.

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #97)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 07:10 PM

103. I'm not personally familiar with

Aussies, so I shouldn't comment on them. I was only going on what I had read about them. My border collie's gentleness matched what I read about Aussies. But he could be very feisty as a protector, which I described in another post about the time he chased down a guy who took my wallet. (I got the wallet back, with the contents still in it.)

We got a 2 year old beagle/basset mix when Laddie was full grown. The hound was not housebroken when we got it and did not know indoor dog house rules. The first few days there was some tension about territory and ego, but Laddie adapted. He tattled on the hound by coming to us and barking when the hound did something wrong. It was funny, like Laddie felt sophisticated next to a bumpkin, and had to supervise the hound. They got along ok, played together sometimes, but Laddie always acted like he felt superior. The hound tolerated that and they were company for each other when we were at work.

Laddie was very loyal, but liked the freedom to do his own thing, too, when running free outdoors in the country. Exceptionally good about coming back when called and staying close when in public around people. Did not really need a leash, but we used it where law required it. Liked people. Good at independent judgment, too. Very cooperative at the vet clinic, where everyone loved him.





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Response to nocoincidences (Reply #4)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 06:45 PM

41. + 1

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Response to nocoincidences (Reply #4)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 07:53 PM

52. Agreed-smartest Dogs ever

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 04:55 PM

5. What a beautiful story

We are German Shepherd Dog people. We have had four of them in our family over the course of about 25 years. Gigi, Pete, Annie, and Riley. Smart, sweet, protective, and funny. My neighbor Lisa had two (Zach and Andi) and I had Pete and Gigi. We would walk them with our four children. It drove the dogs nuts when the two older kids would ride a little bit ahead on their bikes and then they would relax as the kids rode back in our direction. And I will tell you that anybody walking down the trail couldn't get far enough away from us - four large GSDs on patrol!

One day, Lisa's husband Bill needed to come into our back yard when I wasn't there, to retrieve something of Lisa's. Well, Bill was there with a friend. Pete knew Bill, but not the friend. So he allowed Bill to come in through the gate, but made it ABUNDANTLY clear to the friend that he had not been properly introduced, Mom wasn't there, and he better clear out if he knew what was good for him. Scared the guy sufficiently that he remained on the other side of the gate. Good boy Pete!

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Response to leftieNanner (Reply #5)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 05:34 PM

19. LOL. Dogs are so loyal and protective.

My grandfather had a collie/shepherd mix named Lady on his farm when I was a child. Lady and I became so attached to each other that as soon as my parents pulled up in their car, she greeted us from wherever she had been and clung to my side until we left.

I explored the farm -- the fields, woods, and creek -- with Lady at my side. She stopped when I did, and moved on when I did. Nobody worried about me, a city kid, going off on my own bc they knew Lady would look after me.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 05:02 PM

6. Pitties 🐕 💖

As long as they're not from fighting stock and are properly socialized ... best doggos evah imho ...

But I love all dogs ... Border Collies and Aussies are probably next, followed by any kind of Retriever ...

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 05:02 PM

7. Golden Labradors.

Or Goldadors, as some people unfortunately call them.

You get the hardiness of a Labrador Retriever and the intelligence and kindness of a Golden Retriever and you end up with a dog who can do anything.

They are strangely hard to come by but if you ever live with one youíll know youíve found the perfect dog.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 05:06 PM

8. Dachshunds. I grew up with them and I have a dachshund mix now who's scary smart.

They are sassy and independent. One they are trained, theyíre trained. And they are sooooo cute!

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Response to Cousin Dupree (Reply #8)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 06:54 PM

43. Right there with you on the Dachshunds! I love them

If I were to get a dog, it would be a doxie. They are the funniest dogs ever, natural born clowns yet they can be very cuddly.

Until recently I did not know of the color ranges they come in, just the black & brown and the red.

We baby sat my uncle's doxie when they were between postings (with us for 6 weeks) and we had so much fun with him. If you just pat the ground, he would start digging and Honestly I think he would have dug to China!! He was a full size standard which is something you don't see often over here (they got him when they were stationed in Germany)

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Response to Cousin Dupree (Reply #8)

Tue Mar 31, 2020, 01:08 AM

119. I agree. I LOVE Dachshunds!

I grew up with a part Dachshund part Beagle. I loved that dog more than I've ever loved any other furry critter in my whole life..

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 05:07 PM

9. After 32 years with 2 Lhasa Apso dogs, without a doubt those are the best

For starters Lhasa's shed very very little. There is nothing more annoying than a couch full of dog hair when I visit other people with dogs.
Lhasa's were bred in Tibet to catch mice inside grain storage structures, so they can accelerate amazingly fast. I could not throw a tennis ball fast enough inside a long hallway before it hit the end of hall. The dogs caught it first!

Another characteristic of Lhasa dogs is their keen hearing. They are incredibly good burglar alarms. And our last Lhasa was a 10 lb female and she loved to sit on our laps and her very long hair stayed silky soft until the day she passed away at age 16. Being so small their feeding cost is low. Only weak point in these dogs is their eyes. I cleaned their eyes every few days to prevent infections.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 05:12 PM

11. Rat Terriers. Love that they are feisty little dogs but also "chill" when you need them to.

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Response to OregonBlue (Reply #11)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 05:59 PM

28. Exactly. Full of energy, but they have an "Off" button. They will play and they will cuddle.

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Response to Midnight Writer (Reply #28)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 05:31 PM

102. Yes. Not like other terriers in that respect.

Love them.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 05:12 PM

12. Newfoundland

They are big.

They have sweet personalities.

They don't bark a lot.

They are great for cuddling.

They have the sweetest face.

They love water.

They are strong.

They are beautiful.

They are used for water rescues and pulling carts.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 05:13 PM

13. Boxer Lab mix

Also Pyrs, but the previous 2 were Pyrs and had cancer related deaths at the way too early ages 6 and 7 respectively.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 05:22 PM

14. Standard Poodles

We got Bama 2 years ago, and then his half brother last year. Never on a million years did I ever think I would have poodles, but these guys have changed my attitude. We do not give them fancy clips at all, but do keep their hair short except for on top of their heads and their tails. We clip them at home.
They are the smartest and most athletic dogs I've ever had and I have had several shepherds and labs as well as a Dalmatian so far. They are also hilarious--cracking up the whole family with their antics. They also are excellent watch dogs.
The younger one jumps in the pool to swim with me, but his older brother hides behind the bushes because he hates swimming. He acts like he must have been a cat in an earlier life. He also will kill birds or chickens if he gets the chance--fast as lightning.
They have been super easy to train and aside from being great at play they are affectionate. They have been wonderful members of our family.

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Response to pandr32 (Reply #14)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 05:41 PM

21. I agree with poodles, but I like minitures.

Same reason as above, but minis take up less room in the bed.

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Response to broiles (Reply #21)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 07:45 PM

50. Ha-Ha! Ours are too big for the bed

They have their own

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Response to pandr32 (Reply #14)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 05:59 PM

27. Standard poodles are my second choice after

border collies. Never had a standard poodle, but have always admired them for their smarts and personality. A friend had one and the first time it met me, it looked directly at my face with curious intelligence, checking me out, and then cocked its head as if pondering what I was like. It was both charming and a little intimidating to make me feel like I had to pass some sort of test. Apparently I did pass because he accepted me with affection.

I prefer standards over miniatures and toys bc they are so majestic looking. Can't understand why anybody decided to downsize this breed. My former sister-in-law used to breed toys and it seemed to me that something was lost in the process of making these dogs smaller. Much prefer the full sized dog. If I had one, I also would not get fancy cuts for it. Just enough to keep it neatly groomed.

But, I cannot have one. I now live in an apartment building that restricts dog ownership to small breeds of 30 pounds or less. I have a cat instead.

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Response to wnylib (Reply #27)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 08:06 PM

56. You described Bama and Ziggy to a T

They are intuitive and inquisitive for sure.

John Steinbeck had a standard called Charley. He took him everywhere and Charley's hair was kept neat and shortish--not fussy.

Ours are kept like that with a tiny exception: both are parti-poodles (bi-colored), and Bama is all black except for a thin lightning bolt on his front neck and chest and a white patch on his bottom jaw. I keep a little goatee on him to show it off and it gives him a rather suave, but bad-ass look. Ziggy is all pied like a pinto pony and even though he is younger (same father as Bama) he is huge. He looks like a royal poodle but he just happened on the really large genes. He leaves huge paw prints like a wolf.
I have always preferred big dogs. Probably because a chihuahua bit me as a child. The lady holding him had held him out for me to pet, too, and then said it was so unlike him to bite anyone. I had to get a rabies shot. Also, I cannot handle high-pitched yapping--drives me insane.

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Response to pandr32 (Reply #56)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 09:21 PM

65. She was not being honest when she said

Last edited Mon Mar 30, 2020, 02:58 AM - Edit history (1)

it was out of character for her chihuahua to bite. They are high strung, territorial, and very protective of their owners, especially when being held in the owners' arms. Several of my neighbors have chihuahuas bc my apt building rules limit dogs to small breeds of 30 pounds or less. They are yappy little biters. I think their size gives them Napoleonic complexes.

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Response to wnylib (Reply #65)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 02:55 PM

94. That seems like what happened

I was about 6 yrs old.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 05:24 PM

17. Gordon setter

Best dog ever. I havenít seen one in forever- the breed doesnít seem popular around here.

Iíve raised two Aussies and loved them both. Wouldnít have one again unless we lived on a farm and then that would be my first choice.

Of course my current dog is really the best dog ever! Heís a lab mix- mixed with American bulldog, Weimaraner and German Shepard. Passes as a lab, but had features of all that. Super sweet and smart. Weirdly tall legs. Wide chest and super strong. The cat still dominates.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 05:40 PM

20. Golden Retrievers ...

because they're the Best.

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Response to GeorgeGist (Reply #20)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 06:01 PM

30. They are sweeties

 

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Response to GeorgeGist (Reply #20)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 04:19 AM

78. Yes, they are my favorites as well!

They are so loving, affectionate and loyal. They are just the sweetest dogs in the world! I adore them!

I also love Swiss Mountain Dogs. They are such gentle giants and very sweet natured, but not quite as cuddly and affectionate as Goldens.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 05:45 PM

22. I'd say Border Collie also.

I got mine from a shelter 6 years ago. Didn't know what she was for over a year, as she is a smooth-coat border collie and I'd never heard of them.

She does tend to want the kids to stay with the group.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 05:51 PM

23. Yellow Labs

The reason is my dog is right next to me on the couch and he insisted I post this!
Actually, I don't have a fave, but last 2 were labs.
This one sacking out next to me is super smart & very empathetic. He's also a spoiled brat. So, there's that!

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 05:55 PM

24. Shelties LOL

They are so beautiful, sweet, and smart...and they always want to be good. They own a special place in my heart. 💖

That said, I really love all dogs! 😁

Thank you for this wonderful thread!

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Response to SheltieLover (Reply #24)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 06:09 PM

32. I love shelties, too. They are so beautiful

and have some of the traits of collies and border collies. But, they require so much grooming that I don't think I could deal with it. The trend seems to be to breed their coats longer and fuller than is practical for anyone but a show dog owner. Hard for me to imagine them as household pets.

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Response to wnylib (Reply #32)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 06:10 PM

33. Very true!

They do take a lot of grooming.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 05:56 PM

25. Scottish Terrier

I am sure from my avatar, it is pretty obvious that my favorite breed of dog is a Scottie.

I got my first Scottie when I was in elementary school. FDR was my hero and I wanted a dog just like Fala. I now have my 7th Scottish Terrier. They are not a dog for everyone. They are little persons and are possessed by total dignity. Intelligent does not even maybe begin to describe a Scottie. Each and everyone of my wee lassies and laddies that have owned me -- and believe me, it's not the other way around -- has amazed me by some trait or trick or instinct he or she possessed. My beloved Scottie I lost nearly three years ago was a certified hearing assist dog. She was amazing. A friend helped me train her and there was nothing she missed. She road in a special basket in my car next to me. Her main purpose was to alert to sirens. While at times I could hear them -- when wearing my hearing aids -- my problem was I could not tell the direction from which the sound was coming. Mags would howl and turn her head toward the source of the sound. This was a blessing when I was in downtown LA or other areas with tall buildings which blocked my view from seeing the source of the sound. In a parking lot after we got out of the car, she would pull me to the side and away from cars I was not able to hear that were approaching from the rear. At the grocery store, she road shot-gun in the top portion of the basket because I could not hear the "beep beep" of the large motorized carts if they came at us from the rear. Mags would alert me immediately.

Fiercely loyal, sturdy wee doggies -- the females of the breed are especially loyal to their homes. They will defend their territory to the max. My late husband, who loved HUGE dogs, found my Scotties to be "a big dog in a small dog's body."

Being loved by a Scottish Terrier is an honor!

[link:?fifu|

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Response to TruckFump (Reply #25)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 06:13 PM

34. My brother had a Scottie. Smart, cute,

and good company.

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Response to wnylib (Reply #34)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 06:22 PM

36. Yes, they are.

They just want to be with the person they love and who loves them.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 05:57 PM

26. Awwwww

What a sweet story!

He wasn't about to let that sweet little lamb go over the iff! 😍

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Response to SheltieLover (Reply #26)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 06:35 PM

38. The little girl was adorable, dressed

in a spring outfit with long pants that had ruffles where her butt bulged from her diaper.

The mother had been holding her, but she fussed to be put down and wandered off farther and quicker than seemed possible since the park's lawn was still lumpy after the snow had melted.

The kid had no clue, of course, of her danger or the scare she gave us. She LOVED the dog's attention to her. Kept saying, "Doggie! Doggie!"

I'd bet that when she got older, her parents told her about the day she scared them half to death and was rescued by a stranger's dog.

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Response to wnylib (Reply #38)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 06:37 PM

39. LOL

They should dress her as lamb every Halloween! 🤣👍

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 06:00 PM

29. I'm going to be honest and tell you I didn't read your entire post...

I would have, but my choice is border collie (Iíve had 3 and know many others) and I understand....

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Response to lisa58 (Reply #29)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 06:38 PM

40. Yep. Once you've lived with one, you

know what remarkable creatures they are.

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Response to wnylib (Reply #40)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 06:47 PM

42. Amazing...

I hate to be a snob about it, but I am: if it isnít a border collie, itís just a dog...

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Response to lisa58 (Reply #42)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 07:57 PM

53. I understand. i do like other dogs,

but it's border collies that I love above all.

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Response to wnylib (Reply #53)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 08:04 PM

55. So do I, but once you've known a border collie...

And they have looked in your eyes - itís all over..

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 06:03 PM

31. Bulldog

Stout, friendly, protective, unbreakable, close to the ground, powerful, and comfy to lay on or to lay on me.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 06:21 PM

35. I have two

Old English Sheepdog, we are on number 3 and Basset Hounds, we've had three.

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Response to Worried senior (Reply #35)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 07:11 PM

47. After Laddie was grown up, we got

a half beagle, half basset (bassle?) that we named Beau. He had the long basset ears and the quirky habit of swinging his ears to catch one in his mouth.

Beau was 2 years old when we got him from the Humane Society. They said he was a stray. I think he had never lived indoors bc he was not housebroken and rejected all rules of indoor dog behavior. Laddie took it upon himself to tattle on Beau whenever he broke a rule, like peeing on the kitchen floor or swiping food from the table behind my back.

Beau was also an escape artist. Always figured a way out of our fenced in yard and Laddie would follow him to round him up.

But Beau's funniest behavior was his reaction to snow. He was...um...well hung. Did not like squatting in the snow for bowel movements and freezing his well hungness. So he took a long time to trample down a wide circle before squatting. One time, when the snow was deep, he lifted a front paw and licked it, whimpering. I thought it was injured and carried him awkwardly back to the porch. Once I set him down to check his paw, he walked on it with no problem. He just didn't like stepping in the snow.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 06:28 PM

37. Bichons

They are cute, very friendly, don't shed and don't have a ton of medical issues. If you feed them correctly, they aren't prone to allergies.

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Response to Ferrets are Cool (Reply #37)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 04:20 AM

79. I agree

Also they are very , very smart and got my wife one and what a loving little thing she is , and a great lap dog. They get along with other animals well to.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 06:57 PM

44. though I own a border collie now and love him, my favorite breed isn't a breed at all...

... at least it isn't recognized by the AKC.

For about 25 years, I had hybrid wolves (actually 'wolf dogs' because they're not really hybrids.)

A 25% timber / 75% malamute.
A 50% timber / 50% husky.
A 75% arctic tundra / 25% husky (and SHE was hard to explain to people.)

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 07:01 PM

45. Solid black, and orange tabby

Sorry folks, but I've never had a good experience with dogs. I am definitely a cat person.

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Response to jmowreader (Reply #45)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 07:31 PM

48. LOL. I have had both and like them

both. But I do have a slight preference for cats bc they're so quirky, with a logic that is uniquely their own.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 07:03 PM

46. It's a tie for me, German Shepherds and Poodles

I've had both, the Poodles have always been Miniatures. I'd like to have a Standard at some point. Both breeds are scary smart, which is a mixed blessing!, they're naturally protective and easily trained. And both breeds have amazing personalities.
When I was about 10 or 12, we lived in a rural area. It was the summer, and I was at the mailbox, which was on the main road at the end of the dirt road I lived on. Middle of the day. A man pulled onto my dirt road and stopped, got out of his car and began to approach me. My German Shepherd got between us as he got out of his car, and as he took a few steps toward me her hackles came up and she began growling and moved toward him. This was about 1970-72, long before you heard about child abductions and awful things of that nature, but somehow I knew his intentions were not good the minute he got out of his car. I could see it and feel it, and she did too. After she started growling and baring her teeth, he backed away and got in his car, and drove down the road, which was a dead end. We ran to my house, and I went in, locked the door and called my mom at work. When the guy drove back up the road he drove slowly, and my dog went out into the yard with her hackles up and teeth bared at him. I have no proof of course, but I have always believed she saved my life that day.
My memory is that my mom called the sheriff's department and came home, and they patrolled our area more often for a while.
Right now I have a Heinz 57, a Lab/Chessy mix, a Rat Terrier, and a German Shepherd/ Belgian Malinois, and I love them all dearly.

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Response to ms liberty (Reply #46)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 07:37 PM

49. He was probably up to no good.

Trust your own instincts and the dog's, too. Good thing she was there with you.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 07:51 PM

51. Schnauzers (minis)

...we've had a lot of breeds over 55 years.

We actually don't mind the yipping and energy. I think it often depends on your lifestyle, space available, and personality.

We have two rescue schnauzers now. Love them both.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 07:58 PM

54. German Shepherds

I've had three in my lifetime & they've brought me a lot of happiness.


This is the DU member formerly known as JimGinPA.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 08:08 PM

57. Love them all but partial to Rottweilers...

They are funny and smart and pony-sized lap dogs.

I love their energy and mischievous personalities.

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Response to Phentex (Reply #57)

Sat Apr 4, 2020, 10:41 PM

139. I love Rotties too!

My sister had one. Her name was Ruby and I just adored her! She was almost human.

She didn't like everyone, but if she loved you, she was so affectionate. She's been gone a few years now, but I will never forget her. She was so smart, loving and had such a great personality! I miss her so much!

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 08:12 PM

58. Border collies

My Christie was a lot like your Laddie. Scary smart. Super sweet. People marveled. She was telepathic. Have a different breed, now, for lifestyle limitation reasons. Besides, there could only ever be one Christie.

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Response to mdelaguna (Reply #58)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 01:41 AM

70. We lived in the city, which limited

Laddie's winter exercise to our yard. In the spring, we drove to the countryside where he could run free. He flushed up birds and tracked rabbits with no training. Also chased deer which was illegal and could get a dog shot, so we called him back from deer chases and he returned without hesitation. Taught him to leave deer alone and he did.

He loved water. When he was 6 months old, we went on a picnic by a creek with another couple who had a black lab the same age. The lab went into the water and my husband put Laddie in the creek, over my objections. Laddie and the lab dog-paddled together. After that, Laddie jumped into creeks on his own. We tossed sticks in the water and he chased them down to bring them back to us. He even retrieved a small rock that we dropped into Lake Erie near the shore. Felt in the sandy bottom for it with his paws, then stuck his face in to pick it up.

At home, he played in the bath tub. This was the early 1970s, and we rented an old house. It had a claw tub with a plug and a handle to turn on the water. Laddie would turn the water on and block the drain with his paw until the water rose around him, then pull his paw back and watch the water swirl down the drain, occasionally blocking it, then letting go again. I had to shut him in another room while I filled the tub or he would pull the plug to watch the water drain.

He knew an incredible number of words and phrases and picked them up quickly from conversational context and body language, like a person does. Scary intelligence.



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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 08:21 PM

59. Pekingese

Being a city dweller and in no need of herding other mammals we are content with the companionship the breed bred specifically to be an emperors lapdog. They are great city dogs and the addition of a robovac has made life so much more manageable as they do shed. A lot.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 08:22 PM

60. Jack Russell. My last dog of 15 years, passed away in my arms. Smart, Loving and challenging.

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Response to OverBurn (Reply #60)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 12:36 AM

67. Oh, definitely challenging.

Friend of mine has a Jack Russell. And a scruffy looking terrier mix. Both female. The Jack Russel acts like a minder or caretaker over the other dog, although the JR is younger and the second dog. Herds the other dog to the door when it's time to go out. Sits outside the bathroom door whimpering when the other one gets a bath. Very assertive with everyone, but not threatening, except as a watchdog. Hyper-energetic.

I visited with my cat. The terrier mix wanted to play with the cat right away, making playful rushes at the cat. The JR tried to assert herself with the cat, nudging him like she did with the other dog. Cat set the JR straight right away about feline independence and established rules of contact and play. Very funny to see the JR taking cues respectfully from the cat.

They soon set up a game. The layout of the house made it possible to go from living room, past entry foyer, to kitchen, and back to living room, in a circle. The cat would stand by the JR, ready to take off, like a challenge, which the JR could not resist. Round and round they went, room to room. After a couple rounds, the cat would leap onto a table in the foyer, too high for the JR to reach, then tap the JR on the head as she passed by. JR would try to reach, get tapped again, and give up to settle in the living room, where the cat would appear again to restart the game. When both tired out, they curled up together on the couch for a nap.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 08:23 PM

61. Every dog is the best. However we had three Weimaraners.

They are so handsome.

Now that we are old we adopted a rescue, a daschund mix of 14 lbs. one we can lift to get to a vet. Heís an incredible boy with the greatest personality.

Dog is Love.

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Response to LakeArenal (Reply #61)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 06:37 AM

82. I love Weimaraners

 

Weíve had a Weimaraner and a GSP. Loved them both, and they loved us right back.

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Response to LakeArenal (Reply #61)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 11:42 AM

92. Both are so alike. We love GSPs

The ears. Like velvet. The eyes so soulful.

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Response to LakeArenal (Reply #61)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 10:30 PM

112. We had a Weim many years ago. He was one of the smartest

and funniest dogs we ever had.

We were camping one weekend and it got pretty cold during the night. The Weim was shaking from the cold so I slipped a sweatshirt over him and let him snuggle in the sleeping bag. The next evening, when he wanted to go to bed, he opened the zipper of the tent with his nose and walked back out with the sweatshirt in his mouth. I put it on him, he returned to the tent and popped himself into the bag. He loved his jammies!

At home, he'd watch the digital clock move to 11:00 and give us the "It's my bedtime" look. He was trained not to bark in the house, but he learned that flapping his ears was just as effective in getting what he wanted. If you tried to ignore him while watching TV, he'd stand directly in front of the screen with the attitude of "If you won't look where I'm standing, I'll stand where you're looking."

He was quite the character.

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Response to Totally Tunsie (Reply #112)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 11:35 PM

115. Sigh. Too smart sometimes.

Bit stubborn. Love love creature comforts.

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Response to LakeArenal (Reply #115)

Tue Mar 31, 2020, 01:08 AM

121. We used to go to the Weimaraner Field Trials on occasion,

which was quite the sight.

The day would start with a couple hundred trucks/SUVs arriving basically the same time, opening their vehicle doors and hundreds of Weims bounding out onto the field. They'd run; they'd sniff; they were a moving carpet of gray. You'd have to rely on your dog finding you rather than the other way around - just too many, all looking pretty much alike. LOL

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Response to Totally Tunsie (Reply #121)

Tue Mar 31, 2020, 12:58 PM

136. ❤️❤️❤️

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 08:32 PM

62. spits or shepherds cause cat ears. i am a cat person.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 08:42 PM

63. Raised with a cocker; had cockers when my kids were little

Just love cockers.

But I must say, my old neighbor had an Australian Shepherd and that was one smart and beautiful pooch.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 08:54 PM

64. Herding dogs are great

I have a bearded collie.

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Response to Gothmog (Reply #64)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 02:03 AM

72. Don't think I ever ssw one.

What do they look like?

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Response to wnylib (Reply #72)

Sat Apr 4, 2020, 09:51 PM

138. Did you see the movie the Shaggy Dog with Tim Allen?

Tim Allen turned into a bearded collie. Two of my dogs were in that movie and my new puppy is related to the main dog in that movie
Here is a picture of some beardies






I have one 9 month old puppy. My son has a 10 year old male and my middle child has a 10 year female and the brother of my puppy.

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Response to Gothmog (Reply #138)

Sun Apr 5, 2020, 12:28 AM

141. Have not seen the Tim Allen

version of the movie, only the old one with Fred McMurray and an old English sheepdog.

They look beautiful, but don't they need a lot of grooming? I wonder about the number of herding dogs that have such long, full coats. Seems like the coats would get in the way of their jobs.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Mar 29, 2020, 09:24 PM

66. Tricolor border collies.

 

I grew up with one named Sugar. She was a most remarkable animal, almost scary smart.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 12:44 AM

68. Your Dog!!!!

That story has me in tears!!!!

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Response to IGoToDU (Reply #68)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 02:38 AM

73. Had the poor mother in tears, too, and trembling

head to foot. I'm just glad that Laddie and I were attuned to each other enough that I realized what he wanted and let him go.

He did another "heroic deed" weeks later. I walked a few blocks to a convenience store and tied his leash on a pole near the door while I went inside. When I came out, I set my purse down to untie the leash. After crossing the parking lot to the sidewalk, I realized I had left my purse behind.

When I turned back, a young guy was looking through the purse, for ID, I thought. But when I called out that it was mine, he dropped the purse, kept the wallet, and ran behind the store. Laddie growled and bared his teeth, so I unhooked the leash. When I caught up with them, the guy had been slowed down by a steep hill behind the store. Laddie was snarling like an attack dog and the terrified guy tossed the wallet to use both hands to scramble away up the hill.

Laddie stayed with me and settled down when I picked up the wallet. Everything was still in it.

Border collies are remarkably attuned to their people, as if they think in tandem with us. I guess that is what makes their teamwork with people so valuable as herding dogs. Also makes them good pets to have around, if you can handle their cleverness and energy.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 01:25 AM

69. Great story!

I've known some Border Collies, but never owned one. They are terrific dogs.

Other breeds I've owned....Standard Rough Collie as a kid (great 4-H dog), and another one later. Several Miniature Dachshunds. I have really loved the Sighthounds (the fast breeds that hunt by sight instead of smell). Have had Greyhounds, Salukis, and Borzois. Highly intelligent, elegantly beautiful and graceful, playful, and so loving with their people. Aloof with strangers. Unfortunately, they usually don't mix real well with cats.

I've had Great Pyrenees the past several years. Fell for the breed after getting a puppy that was half Borzoi, half Pyr. A cross-bred mistake, as the breeder raised both, and didn't think the young Borzoi was ready for romance yet. The 3 Pyrs we have now are all rescues. They are wonderful dogs....smart, affectionate, protective of home and family. They have also been bred with an independent streak though, that potential owners need to be aware of--they spent most of their time out with the flocks alone, and had to make their own decisions, as well as, guarding against wolves. They are renowned escape artists and barkers. They were bred to roam large areas as livestock guardians, and to let their human know if they heard/saw anything suspicious.

My favorite dog story is about one of the Borzois, Jazzmin. She was hanging out with me on the porch as I sorted out garden produce. I saw her sidle up to the table a minute, and watch me closely, before she surreptitiously edged off some okra and walked away with it. She came back with it a few minutes later, and sheepishly laid it back on the table. Didn't pass the Jazzy taste test!

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Response to Bayard (Reply #69)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 02:57 AM

74. LOL. Love the sneakiness and contrition.

Some of those breeds I never heard of but they sound fascinating.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 01:56 AM

71. Bedlington Terrier,

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Response to elleng (Reply #71)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 03:07 AM

75. OMG! How cute. Looks like a large

Easter lamb carved out of butter. You sure that's a dog?

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Response to wnylib (Reply #75)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 03:14 AM

76. Yes indeed, OUR dog!

Although 16.5 inches (42 cm) is the preferred height for male dogs, a range from 16 to 17.5 inches (41 to 44 cm) is allowed; for females, the preferred height is 15.5 inches (39 cm) and the acceptable range is from 15 to 16.5 inches (38 to 42 cm).[5] Both genders must weigh between 17 and 23 pounds (7.7 and 10.4 kg).

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 03:27 AM

77. A Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

Because itís the closest dog I can find to a cat.😂

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Response to bamagal62 (Reply #77)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 09:13 AM

87. I generally prefer medium to large sized

dogs but the Cavalier King Charles is one of the few small breeds that I adore. First saw one being walked in a park. Such a sweet face is impossible not to love instantly on sight. It was prancing around confidently and reminded me of a cat assuming the right to be adored.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 05:02 AM

80. hard question for me

I was 2 yrs. old with my first dog, a German Shepard I named Two Cents, because of the white spot above each eye. Such a great dog. My dad believed every child should have a dog.

Then I rescued a cockapoo named Mandy when I was 15 yrs. old, had her 17 yrs. and she was probably 5 when i got her. Smart dog. If we left her alone at home, she would gather every sock, shoe, slipper and pile them at the door, so when we came in, we were well aware of her displeasure.

My daughter had the sweetest Rottie, and her husband had a very smart yellow Lab. Son-in-law trained his dog to duck hunt, and one time when I was babysitting the grandson, SIL decided to not take his dog. He left and Binelli cried and whined for an hour after he left and was dejected. That dog lived to go hunting. We would babysit the dogs when needed. Both well behaved and so affectionate. I came to adore both of their dogs. I enjoyed playing with the dogs, taking them for walks.

We were asked to adopt a friend's Pekingnese 7 yrs. ago. He is now 14 and beginning to fail. He is my favorite of all. He doesn't jump on anyone, or lick people. He is a true lap dog. Not the brightest dog on the planet, but he makes up for it with being comical and sweet. He gets groomed once a month and is white and very light tan. very pretty dog. I had never found pug faces all that cute until we got him. He sticks to me like glue all day and I love it. I'm going to be heartbroken when he's gone. For an older person, a Peke is a perfect dog. Our Peke does not like going on walks, we've tried repeatedly, but gave up on it. He would go for about 1/2 a block and then just lay down and refuse to move. We'd have to carry him back to the house. He could go like a bat out of hell to chase a squirrel but wouldn't go for walks so we couldn't figure out why he didn't like to go on walks. We tried a halter leash, other kinds, it didn't change a thing.

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Response to BatteriesNotNeeded (Reply #80)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 09:24 AM

88. Just about every dog is lovable,

even ones you don't think would be. Just takes getting to know their personality and how to interact with them.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 06:31 AM

81. GSPs

 

Theyíre so affectionate.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 06:40 AM

83. I am also in the BC camp

Ours just had her 14 birthday. Smart, athletic, loving, protector, and a beauty too.

She shows her age these days with really bad arthritis and a little dementia, but she isnít suffering and now that spring is coming around, she has a little more puppy in her step.
This is the DU member formerly known as mrs_p.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 07:08 AM

84. The Rhodesian Ridgeback

Hands down.

https://www.thepetsandlove.com/how-intelligent-are-rhodesian-ridgebacks/
This crossbreeding created the perfect hound and with the help of the Rhodesianís intelligence and strength it was used by lion hunting parties to track, corner, and hold lions. Even now the Rhodesian Ridgebacks are still used for hunting by some owners, but they have come to be more of a family companion than anything else. Because of their strong prey drive they tend to be independent in nature but that also makes them loyal, protective and natural watchdogs.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 08:15 AM

85. I got teary eyed, what a beautiful soul

I love my baby...George is a Wire Fox Terrier. He is just like Laddie, so smart and aware of his surroundings. He knows everyone in the neighborhood and their children, if something is out of order he'll let us know.

I think if he could come back as another being, it would be a bird or an ant...he's fascinated by them and will watch them go about their lives for hours.

For some reason he feels completely threaten by catapilers, we have to move them from his sight, or he will bark and growl until they are gone.

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Response to Bluethroughu (Reply #85)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 10:21 AM

89. Gotta watch out for long critters

with too many legs. They wiggle and coil up like mini snakes. And they shape shift into flying objects.

Actually, the reason might be in the dog's sense of smell. Many caterpillars have toxic substances as self protection from becoming bird prey. A dog with a good sniffer might detect the toxin and consider the caterpillar as dangerous as a snake with venom.

That's just a guess. I don't really know the reason for sure. Some butterflies retain the toxins past the caterpillar stage. If he doesn't like butterflies, either, that could be a clue.

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Response to wnylib (Reply #89)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 03:21 PM

95. Wow...

You could be right on the smell, he sniffs the middle of the patio doors where the glass doors meet to verify what he is seeing outside and he does do this with the caterpillars also.


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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 08:28 AM

86. My basset mix

Had her DNA tested
1/4 Basset Hound
1/8 Golden Retriever
1/8 Labrador Retriever
1/8 American Staffordshire terrier
balance mutt

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Response to MrsMatt (Reply #86)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 10:34 AM

90. Wow. What a mix. Should make an

interesting, unique dog.

Of course, they are all unique, despite shared breed traits.

I have had multiple mix dogs (mutts). They were great and memorable pets.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 11:34 AM

91. I've had 5 border collies and one of them currently

All of them were different. Some had strong herding instincts and some did not. All were very smart and were easily trainable.

However, there should be a warning attached to all of them. There's a reason you'll find so many of them at the pound and the reason is they are not compatible with many people. Some of them are escape artists who can and will find a way out of any and all attempts to restrain them. Some of them will heard small children (they will also try to heard strange adults). This can be very frightening to some small children and annoying to those with frequent guests. Some will chew up everything in your house, including the house itself. This happens with many dogs when they are in the puppy stage, but they grow out of it. Many border collies will never grow out of it. My current border collie is over 10 years old and I can't use a normal dog bed with her because she even shredded a kevlar dog bed I bought that was allegedly chew proof. They will constantly bark if left outside alone, and they should never be left alone. They are even more social than other dogs and it's best not to get one if you only plan on having one dog.

Most of these problems have a solution, and the solution is border collies need both physical, but more importantly mental exercise. They need tasks to perform. Sometimes this can be satisfied by daily walks, but with some it can not and they need more intensive exercises like problem solving. In short, they are high maintenance dogs. Like most breeds they are purpose bred, but in this case the purpose is complex and intensive. They need that level of activity to keep them happy. If you want a dog that will lay around the house all day and be satisfied, get a golden retriever. Those dogs are a better fit for people who are going to dedicate their lives to maintaining them and that commitment is going to be higher than for most other types of dogs.

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #91)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 01:51 PM

93. I've heard those warnings about

border collies and don't doubt it. Laddie chewed everything in sight, past the puppy teething stage, but learned not to, and became a model of good indoor behavior. The change had a lot to do with social bonding, which Laddie craved.

While I was at work, he pulled a shirt off a hanger in the closet, chewed off all the buttons, and chewed up the hem of a suit jacket. But one day when I came home too tired to deal with it, I broke down and cried. Literal tears, while saying, "Oh, Laddie. How could you?" He had tipped over the kitchen trash and dragged EVERY bit of garbage from it. Carried pieces through the dining room, into the living room. He had also grabbed the end of the toilet paper roll and unravelled it through the bedroom and into the living room. Looked like we'd been attacked by Halloween vandals.

I cried as I cleaned it up and kept sobbing things like, "Why do you do this?" My tone was disappointed and defeated. It penetrated. Laddie was, as you say, very social. He picked up my disappointment. My husband and I were a young, active couple who had given him a lot of attention. We had played with him, taught him tricks, let him out for exercise with us, and bonded with him.

Laddie sensed the change in my mood and our bond that day. He made the connection between that and what he had done. I pointed to the garbage can and said, "No, no." Repeated that with the closet and toilet paper. Firmly, but not harshly. The goal was communication, not venting at him. He got it. We bought him chew toys and squeaky toys. Pointed at them and said, "Good Laddie." Pointed at foridden things and said, "Bad Laddie." Took him everywhere, like shopping, even if he had to stay in the car.

He improved remarkably. Stopped all destructive behavior. Same thing happened with housebreaking when he was younger. No matter how regularly we took him outdoors, he messed inside when he needed to. Until the day I was so tired of cleaning it up that my frustration and disappointment showed. While cleaning it, I said, "This is bad boy. No, no." Pointed to the door, took him into the yard and said,"Good boy." He got it. Like, overnight, it sunk in and he was housebroken.

The key with him was always his desire to maintain a happy bond with us. Plus the incredible capacity for border collies to learn and understand words and body language.

It was worth it for the magnificent companion he grew into. Excessive barking was never a problem with him. Barked only when people came to the door and stopped when told it was ok. Did not herd children without cause, like the example in the OP. It helped when we got another dog and he had company when we were gone.

Agree that they are not for everyone. You need to be active and interactive with them. Plus patient, affectionate, and treat them as part of the family because they are very social and want to belong. In return they will give you great loyalty, entertainment, affection, companionship, protection, amusement, good judgment, and happiness.


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Response to wnylib (Reply #93)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 04:02 PM

96. Not all of them I've had exhibit typical behavior

Just like people, every one is different. You can't train them from bad behavior, especially if you give them alternatives. I always say that with my current border collie she will do or not do anything you want so long as she can understand what you want. But many people aren't going to want to invest that much time or effort and will instead just take them to the pound.

Every single border collie I have owned was one someone else didn't want. Every single one turned into a great dog, but not without considerable effort.

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #96)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 08:03 PM

104. Did you really mean to say that you

Last edited Mon Mar 30, 2020, 08:55 PM - Edit history (1)

"CAN'T train them from bad behavior, especially if you give them alternatives"? A typo, maybe, that should read "CAN"?

Giving alternatives to get the message through about what we did and did not want worked well with Laddie.

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Response to wnylib (Reply #104)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 08:37 PM

105. Yes, should be can

I donít really have to work that hard to train either the border collie or the Aussie. The only difference is the Aussie is easily excitable and has less control over herself when she reaches critical mass. She was born with no tail and as we say goes from zero to full wiggle in .5 seconds. She is the gentlest dog Iíve ever had, though and definitely better around small children.

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #105)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 08:53 PM

106. i just realized in re-reading my own post that I goofed.

I said, training "from good behavior" when it should have read "from bad behavior." I will go back and edit so it does not look so confusing.

That full wiggle must be some sight.


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Response to wnylib (Reply #106)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 09:12 PM

107. She's basically an 8 yr old puppy

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #107)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 11:10 PM

114. Oh, so beautiful and adorable.

I love her just from her pic.

Too bad that I have no photos of Laddie to share. That was back in the 1970s. We had pics of him swimming in a creek and on land waiting eagerly for us to toss a stick. A funny one of him looking exasperated at our "new" 2 year old hound who had not yet learned the house rules.

But they got lost over the years through divorce, moving, remarriage, moving again, etc.

I have occasionally seen photos of border collies that resembled him somewhat, but not often. White face blaze, sable and black blend around the eyes and ears, shaded (black tipped) sable (reddish, not tan) on the shoulders, back, flanks, and tail. Everything else white. His coat seemed to glisten in some lighting, and dirt never stuck to him. Just rolled or flaked off when he groomed himself. He was stubborn about cleaning his own paws and coat after being in snow or dirt, like a cat. Would not let me clean him off. But he let me clip his claws with no trouble.

Very expressive face and eyes, but his default look was happy, eager, and alert. Only downside was a LOT of shedding. Had to vacuum often. I thought his undercoat would make good yarn if I knew how to spin it.

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #105)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 10:30 PM

111. I think I was willing to stick it out

Last edited Tue Mar 31, 2020, 12:16 AM - Edit history (2)

in training Laddie out of his destructive phase (and the earlier housebreaking problem) for a few reasons.

One is that he had already shown, very early, that he learned things quickly, with only praise. Never used treats in training him. So I knew he was smart and capable of learning. Two, his response to praise meant he liked learning and liked feeling like he belonged. Three, his very early demonstration of understanding words and gestures was so remarkable that I loved the feeling of being able to communicate so well with an animal.

So, when the problem behavior developed, I believed in his ability to learn more appropriate behavior. It was just a matter of communicating to him so that he understood. When he "got it" I could almost see the "aha" moment clicking in his brain. It showed in his eyes and posture.

He was like the prize pupil in a class who acts out in boredom. You know he is destined for great things if you can just get through to him. I had fallen in love with his puppy cuteness and smarts and could not give up on him. I was so glad later that I had not given up.

You will probably understand this almost scary abillity to communicate from your experience with border collies. Laddie had a large whiffle ball (his favorite) and a smaller tennis ball. He was not a year old yet when this happened. I never worked at teaching him what "Get the ..." meant. Once he knew the name of something, he produced it if I asked, "Where is the ...?" Or said, "Get the..."

So one day I said, "Get the ball, Laddie." He brought the whiffle ball. To see what he would do, I waved my hand dismissively and said, "Not this ball. The OTHER ball." He took off and returned with the tennis ball.

He had learned the word ball for both of them. His mind processed my gesture of dismissal and he heard the word ball with a distinguishing emphasis (the word other). He concluded correctly that I did not want the whiffle ball, but still wanted a ball. So the alternative was to get another thing called "ball."

That's a lot of mental processing for a dog who was not yet a year old and had never been deliberately taught to distinguish between the two balls.

Too many other examples of his ability to pick up language nuances to describe here.

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Response to wnylib (Reply #111)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 10:59 PM

113. One of my previous border collies was scary with his seemingly unlimited vocabulary

That dog lived to fetch a ball. He would play fetch until he was incapable physically of running anymore without a rest and you wouldn't know he was getting to that point until he just plopped down. We had to limit the number of throws and ration out his play time.

You couldn't say "ball" anywhere in the house without him going nuts. So we started spelling out b-a-l-l. Within a couple of days he figured out what that meant as well. We would use other words in place of ball and he figured those out. You could speak to him in a normal conversational tone and he understood countless commands. You could also use previous commands with words he understood and he would usually figure out what you wanted him to do. He would actually watch TV with us and had some sense of what was going on, and would occassionally bark or growl at other animals on the TV. His favorite movie was "My Dog Skip" and he would sit still and watch the entire thing.

He was huge for a border collie at 80lbs and that was after he lost weight. He was overweight when we got him and we had to slowly ration his food to get him back to a normal weight.

Then one day he got into the trash and ate some chicken bones which gave him pancreatitis which killed him. I miss that dog just about every day.

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #113)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 11:58 PM

116. Laddie was like that with language, too.

He learned spelled words, understood normal conversational language, picked up new word and phrase meanings from context with other words. It was downright spooky, sometimes.

When I was a teen, my family had a black lab/border collie mix. That dog also had a remarkable vocabulary of spoken and spelled words. There was a mom and pop corner store on our street. If that dog heard someone say, "I'm going to the s.t.o.r.e. Want anything?" the dog grabbed his leash and carried it to the person who had spoken. Knew everyone's name. Watched TV and barked at injustice, like scenes of somebody getting beat up. He tried to herd kids playing and would get between them to stop normal wrestling play. He did learn not to interfere with their play, sort of. Still tried, but stopped when told, "No, no."

Laddie had only a passing interest in TV. Did not try herding kids, except the time in the OP when there was a real danger. He acted from judgment as well as instinct. Also had more nuanced perception of situations and language than my family's dog.



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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 04:20 PM

99. Goldens

I've had one that had papers. Three that were mixes from either the animal shelter or a rescue group.

They've all had great temperaments. Laid back. Got along with kitties. Not into chewing things up. Loyal. Playful. Maybe not the smartest, but all very sweet.

We had one--all black that I think was Golden and Black Lab mixed--she looked like a black Golden Retriever. Tanya was smart. And she had a nose.

Years ago, when we lived in Nebraska--where she was adopted from the local animal shelter--we had a 3 story house. I hired the window washing guys to come clean out the gutters one fall. After they left, one came back later that afternoon and asked to look around the sides of the house. He'd lost his wallet--he thought on our job--and it had all the cash in it he needed to make rent. He walked the perimeter of the house, but didn't find it.

The next morning I was looking out the kitchen window and saw Tanya with something out in the fenced pool area. I went out to see what she had--hoping it wasn't a dead animal--and guess what! It was the wallet! I looked inside, and yes, there was a lot of cash!
I called the guy who'd left his number--just in case--and when he arrived about an hour later he had a box of Milk Bones as a reward for Tanya.

Good girl!

Here she is, sitting on the diving board at the Nebraska house. No, she never went in the pool.


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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 04:48 PM

100. Mutts...

Mutts are just happy to be mutts.

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Response to MrScorpio (Reply #100)

Tue Mar 31, 2020, 12:59 AM

118. Yes they are, and some of the best

all around companions, watch dogs, and loyal friends.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 05:23 PM

101. A wire haired Irish Terrier X, definitely part fox ! ;)

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 09:42 PM

108. Papillons.



Incredibly smart and loyal. They make terrific lap dogs but are also very trainable, as in agility training.

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Response to blue neen (Reply #108)

Tue Mar 31, 2020, 12:50 AM

117. My neighbor has a papillon.

Smart, friendly, and so cute with those big ears. I love those ears. They give the dog chatcter and a unique look.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 10:15 PM

109. Where's all the BEAGLE love???

Our Bailey is the sweetest pup!

The family also has a Boxer, a Puggle, and a Coon Hound. Love them all, each for their unique reason.

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Response to Totally Tunsie (Reply #109)

Tue Mar 31, 2020, 01:08 AM

120. My grandfather had a beagle

when I was a kid. We had a huge extended family that gathered at his house for Xmas every year. The dog remained calm an unruffled with all the noise and fuss. Extremely good with all the kids around, even the little ones who petted him in the wrong direction.

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Response to wnylib (Reply #120)

Tue Mar 31, 2020, 01:18 AM

124. Agreed. Beagles are wonderful family dogs.

They take a lot of wear and tear, especially from the little ones in the family. And, OH, those eyes!

Bailey actually belongs to my son and his family, so he's considered to be my Granddog. Of course there's the five+ minutes of arrival hysteria when I walk through the door, but then he's by my side during my entire visit to the point of walking me to the bathroom. On those nights when I stay over, he's sleeping with his head on my pillow. Sweet, sweet boy.

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Response to Totally Tunsie (Reply #124)

Sat Apr 4, 2020, 10:48 PM

140. We had Beagles growing up and they were such sweet dogs!

My mother wasn't a dog person and always wanted us to chain her up out in the barn at night, but my sister and I would sneak her into the house and sleep in my bed together with the dog hidden under the covers. She had her own room and my mother would ask why we were sleeping together and we told her we were scared.

She would say, "I hope that dog isn't in here!" and we would say "No, we put her out already." Of course we were lying and the dog was smart enough to know not to reveal herself while my mother was in the room. We would take her out in the morning and were never found out. We could never bear leaving her on her own in the barn all night. I always thought it was cruel. Dogs belong in the house.

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Response to Totally Tunsie (Reply #109)

Tue Mar 31, 2020, 01:11 AM

122. I mentioned above that I grew up with a part Dachshund/part Beagle..

and he was the best, sweetest, and most adorable furry critter I've ever had in my entire life. There's a lot of Beagle love from me!

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Response to Upthevibe (Reply #122)

Tue Mar 31, 2020, 01:24 AM

126. I'm just surprised there was so little mention in the thread about beagles.

Thought there'd be many more posts about these sweet furbabies.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 10:17 PM

110. We had a beagle that was just the best doggy dog

I loved his "Ahrooo"! He would sit on top of his doghouse like Snoopy. He would "chase" helicopters - LOL. He was hilarious.

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Response to TexasBushwhacker (Reply #110)

Tue Mar 31, 2020, 01:23 AM

125. Beagles are among the cutest puppies.

My cat likes to watch videos. One of her favorites is a Snoopy cartoon. It shows Snoopy leaning over linus from a treetop, like a vulture ready to pounce on Linus to take his blanket. I think the cat relates to the "ready to pounce" posture.

Or, maybe she remembers her pal from the house where she was born. They had a beagle that she was best buds with until I took her at 9 weeks old. The beagle was very disturbed when we put the kitty in a carrier and howled when I walked out with her.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Tue Mar 31, 2020, 01:15 AM

123. I love a lot of breeds, but I would have to say my favorite is the Golden Retriever.

They are just so loving, affectionate, sweet and kind. Of all the breeds my family has had, they have been the most loving and cuddly. They are almost human.

We have also had a lot of Labradors as well, and I love them too, but they are a little more independent and aloof than Goldens. They are very sweet, but not quite as people oriented. They aren't quite as warm as Goldens.

We had one Rottweiler who I adored, but she only liked certain people. She loved me and a few others, but if she didn't like you, she could be a bit hostile. She was so darling though. I just loved her to pieces.

My sister now has a Swiss Mountain Dog who I also adore. She is such a sweet, loving, gentle dog. So good natured and such an easy going personality. She isn't as cuddly or affectionate as a Golden, but she will allow you to lavish affection upon her when she is in a relaxed mood.

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Response to smirkymonkey (Reply #123)

Tue Mar 31, 2020, 01:32 AM

127. I knew a blind man who had a Golden

for a guide dog. The guy was a student on a college campus and the dog took him everywhere expertly. Everyone loved the dog, who remained professional while still being friendly.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Tue Mar 31, 2020, 02:24 AM

128. I have liked German Shepherd Dogs since I was a kid.

My love for German Shepherds started when my best friend had a German Shepherd Brutis who was so smart and friendly.

A few years later my next door neighbor and riding instructor had four beautiful German shepherds. Humptulips ( Hummpy, ) Agie, Gruff, and Roy.

Years later when I was a young adult I had my German Shepherd Sphynx. She was such a smart and loving puppy. I got into a really bad auto accident and they had to rehome her.

Years later I got Shultz. He was my service dog and we had a bond that was stronger than any other I had. He was so smart and some of the things I needed him to do I did not need to train him because he just seemed to automatically figure out what I needed.

I also had Freja who got into an accident and it was getting hard to support two German Shepherds and 4 cats. A friend of mine said she would take her even knowing she will always have expensive health issues. For Freja it was the best decision. She was absolutely in love with my friends husband. I did get to visit her.

I would love to have another German Shepherd but unless I get back to the point I need a large service dog again I am not allowed large dogs where I live.

German Shepherds are so smart, versatile, friendly, even tempered, and just beautiful.

The breeder who I got Shultz and Freja from had this saying on her website. "If it's not a German Shepherd Dog, it's not a dog."

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Response to Doreen (Reply #128)

Tue Mar 31, 2020, 02:47 AM

129. Whew. Some tough breaks you had. Hope

you are doing better now.

I was always a bit wary of German Shepherds because of their use by some people and organizations that trained them to be attack guard dogs.

But when I separated from my husband, I moved in with a coworker who had a German shepherd. The dog was a gentle, smart, and playful pet, but also very protective. She (the dog) accepted me as a household member and extended her protectiveness to me. I appreciated her intelligence when she took a dislike to my husband.

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Response to wnylib (Reply #129)

Tue Mar 31, 2020, 03:10 AM

131. I have a few friends who were scared of German Shepherds.

Shultz changed their minds about German Shepherds.


Some people think a guard dog is supposed to be vicious. Police dogs are not vicious they ate only obeying a command.

After my accident and had been out of the hospital for awhile my friend took me to the fair. Well, at this fair the police were demonstrating the work the K-9 dogs did. Well, one of the officers gave his German Shepherd the command to attack the guy in the suit to protect him. Well, as this dog was making a bee line to attack this person me not yet mentally with it yet called the dog while patting my lap. Well, this seasoned German Shepherd took a sharp turn and ran over to me and put his big head on my lap looked up at me with those German Shepherd eyes while wagging his tail. The officer was not happy and everybody was laughing. The dog got to retire soon after that.

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Response to Doreen (Reply #131)

Tue Mar 31, 2020, 04:09 AM

133. LOL. I was never concerned about

police dogs because I know they are well trained to do a job. It's the people who like to have "tough" pets because they think it makes them tough that bother me. They raise dogs to be mean. Also, German shepherds were one of the breeds used by the Gestapo in WWII. So I knew they had the capacity to be vicious if trained that way.

But the roommate's dog was raised to be an affectionate pet and that's what she was. Sweet and gentle.

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Response to wnylib (Reply #133)

Tue Mar 31, 2020, 04:32 AM

134. I have run into people that have no clue they are actually herding dogs.

The lady who I got my Shultz and Freja from did herding with all of her German Shepherd. No Shutshund at all.

Right after we got Shultz he came bounding into the living room around my husband. My husband said to me, "I do not understand why he keeps herding us around." To which I replied German ShepHERD." His reply, "oh, yeah."

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Tue Mar 31, 2020, 02:52 AM

130. Pom

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Tue Mar 31, 2020, 04:55 AM

135. Standard Poodle

Donít shed much. Really smart. Border collies are smarter but border collies have to work or they are unhappy. Standard Poodles are big enough to stand up to coyotes, a concern when I lived in Laurel Canyon in Los Angeles. My dog Sam taught me the meaning of life.

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Response to wnylib (Original post)

Sun Apr 5, 2020, 01:14 AM

142. Long eared doggies.

Beagles and Bassets. I have a neighbor who has a beagle, and we get along super. I do not have the time or energy to take proper care of a Basset Hound. But if I did, I would have one.

Wolf

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