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Thu Nov 14, 2019, 10:48 AM

"Dinosaurs roamed the Earth on the other side of the Milky Way galaxy"

I'm always fascinated with articles about the universe, about how old the universe is, how old our Milky Way galaxy is and how we all fit into the universe. Not that I always understand what they say, but I'm just amazed our Earth is a little pin prick in the whole universe and even our galaxy. That Earth has existed 4.5 billion years, while humans have existed for only 3.5 - 4 million years. It puts into perspective sometimes how insignificant we all are in the total scheme of things. That while we are on this earth for such a short time we really should be focused on making life better for all and protecting our planet.

Anyway given that background, you can understand why I might be interested in an article titled.....

Earth was on the other side of the galaxy when dinosaurs reigned

By Ashley Strickland, CNN 8 hrs ago

Apart from the asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs 65 million years ago, there aren't many connections between space and dinosaurs outside of the imagination. But that all changed when NASA research scientist Jessie Christiansen brought the two together in an animation on social media this month.

For the past decade, Christiansen has studied planet occurrence rates, or how often and what kinds of planets occur in the galaxy, while studying data from exoplanet hunters such as NASA's Kepler, K2 and TESS missions.

During a stargazing party at the California Institute of Technology, Christiansen was explaining how young the stars were that they observed. The skywatchers were looking at the Pleiades, a bright young cluster of stars that are some of the youngest in our sky.

They're 13 million years old, which sounds ancient. Christiansen wanted to convey that astronomically, that's still a young age.

She told her fellow stargazers that before they went extinct, dinosaurs wouldn't have even seen these stars in the sky because they didn't exist until millions of years after the extinction event. And she told them that when dinosaurs such as stegosaurs roamed the Earth, our entire solar neighborhood was on the opposite of the Milky Way galaxy that it is now.

More>>>>>
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/earth-was-on-the-other-side-of-the-galaxy-when-dinosaurs-reigned/ar-BBWIg4V?li=BBnbcA1



A NASA scientist's incredible animation shows how dinosaurs roamed the Earth on the other side of the Milky
Way galaxy

https://www.businessinsider.com/video-nasa-scientist-dinosaurs-milky-way-2019-10


The articles mentions how NASA research scientist Jessie Christiansen developed an animation to visually depict the relationship between our Solar System's trip around the center of the Milky Way Galaxy and dinosaurs.


?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1166773845400801281&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.businessinsider.com%2Fvideo-nasa-scientist-dinosaurs-milky-way-2019-10

I follow Dr Christiansen's Twitter feed. She does a great job of explaining things for the lay person.

Just thought you all might find this interesting

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Reply "Dinosaurs roamed the Earth on the other side of the Milky Way galaxy" (Original post)
Fla Dem Nov 14 OP
tblue37 Nov 14 #1
Thomas Hurt Nov 14 #2
Phoenix61 Nov 14 #3
Fla Dem Nov 14 #7
paleotn Nov 16 #23
PoindexterOglethorpe Nov 14 #4
Fla Dem Nov 14 #8
PoindexterOglethorpe Nov 14 #9
Fla Dem Nov 14 #10
PoindexterOglethorpe Nov 14 #11
packman Nov 14 #5
DFW Nov 14 #6
CaptainTruth Nov 14 #12
JohnnyRingo Nov 14 #13
keithbvadu2 Nov 14 #14
keithbvadu2 Nov 14 #15
Karadeniz Nov 14 #16
LeftInTX Nov 14 #17
sl8 Nov 15 #18
MatthewHatesTrump2 Nov 15 #19
flying rabbit Nov 16 #20
Leith Nov 16 #21
Boomer Nov 16 #22

Response to Fla Dem (Original post)

Thu Nov 14, 2019, 10:52 AM

1. Big K&R. Brilliant! nt

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Response to Fla Dem (Original post)

Thu Nov 14, 2019, 11:03 AM

2. I always find this stuff interesting, the scale of Earth, the Solar system and space is astounding

we have a hard time wrapping our heads around it due to our terrestrial existence. Best we can do is put it in perspective we grasp.

Example: If the Sun is a meter and half in diameter, Earth is the size of marble and the diameter of the solar system to Neptune is roughly 7 miles.

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Response to Fla Dem (Original post)

Thu Nov 14, 2019, 11:19 AM

3. Stars we see in the sky may already be gone.

We could be seeing light that started its journey to us tens of thousands of years ago. How trippy is that?

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Response to Phoenix61 (Reply #3)

Thu Nov 14, 2019, 01:36 PM

7. I know, that's always fascinated me. Plus the fact the universe is expanding.

So I always wonder, when we see pictures taken by the Hubble Telescope of far off galaxies, do they still exit? Or when they show the birth of a star, how many millions of years ago did that actually take place. So many questions.

This video of the birth of a star, but a million years old.

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Response to Phoenix61 (Reply #3)

Sat Nov 16, 2019, 09:55 PM

23. Yep. Antares or Betelgeuse

may supernova tonight...or already went supernova centuries ago and we just haven't seen it yet. Weird stuff.

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Response to Fla Dem (Original post)

Thu Nov 14, 2019, 12:17 PM

4. Thank you for that post and link.

Those who blithely think we've been visited by aliens from somewhere else in our galaxy fail utterly to understand just how vast interstellar spaces really are. Here's something I learned recently may help.

Our galaxy, Milky Way, has about 300 billion (that's billion with a b) stars. Andromeda, the nearest one of any size (some smaller ones are closer) has one trillion stars of so, about three times as many. The two galaxies are on a collision course. Brace yourself and pay attention to property values. Although the initial impact is over 4 billion years away.

Anyway, I recently asked an astronomer friend just how many individual stars will actually crash together when that happens. He said they weren't entirely sure, but probably no more than 10.

Of course many more will interact gravitationally, but actually smash together like flaming car wrecks? An infinitesimally small number.

Here's a cool video of what will happen:

Also, it's obvious that Milky Way has already swallowed up smaller galaxies in the past, and eventually (some 150 billion years from now) all of the galaxies in our local group will have merged, and by that time everything else will be so far away that their light won't reach us. So astronomers in that distant future will have no way of knowing that there is anything outside their own huge galaxy, will have no way of knowing how old the Universe is because the microwave background radiation from the Big Bang will by then be undetectable, and will simply be living in an old and aging portion of an old and aging Universe.

I really do love astronomy and cosmology.

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Response to PoindexterOglethorpe (Reply #4)

Thu Nov 14, 2019, 01:41 PM

8. Yes, I've read that. If, and that's a big if, there is any life on earth

at some point, because of the expansion of the universe, they will see no visible light in the night sky. Well, I know I won't be around to experience that.

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Response to Fla Dem (Reply #8)

Thu Nov 14, 2019, 02:10 PM

9. No. This planet will not wind up outside any galaxy.

While there are stars out there between galaxies, that's not going to happen to us. Everything in our local cluster will still be visible. It's just that all the other millions upon millions of other galaxies will be so far away light from them will no longer reach us. Our own mega galaxy will have trillions of stars in it, until the eventual heat death of the Universe.

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Response to PoindexterOglethorpe (Reply #9)

Thu Nov 14, 2019, 02:39 PM

10. Thank you for the clarification.That makes sense.

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Response to Fla Dem (Reply #10)

Thu Nov 14, 2019, 02:59 PM

11. Glad to be helpful.

I love astronomy stuff, and my son is in a PhD program in astronomy on the east coast. He's my go-to guy for all astronomy and cosmology questions.

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Response to Fla Dem (Original post)

Thu Nov 14, 2019, 12:17 PM

5. Good stuff - Thanks for posting

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Response to Fla Dem (Original post)

Thu Nov 14, 2019, 12:39 PM

6. With me, the terms "person" and "dinosaur" are interchangeable

I own fossils of animals that used to be my house pets.

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Response to Fla Dem (Original post)

Thu Nov 14, 2019, 06:10 PM

12. So that's why dinosaurs are having such a problem getting their mail forwarded.


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Response to Fla Dem (Original post)

Thu Nov 14, 2019, 07:58 PM

13. Always something to learn about our galaxy.

Thanx for posting!

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Response to Fla Dem (Original post)

Thu Nov 14, 2019, 09:07 PM

14. Dinosaurs are still dangerous.

Dinosaurs are still dangerous.

https://i.imgur.com/kJEWynz.mp4

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Response to keithbvadu2 (Reply #14)

Thu Nov 14, 2019, 09:29 PM

15. Wish upon a falling star

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Response to Fla Dem (Original post)

Thu Nov 14, 2019, 09:54 PM

16. Mind blowing...who would've thought!!!!

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Response to Fla Dem (Original post)

Thu Nov 14, 2019, 10:25 PM

17. Fascinating!!

Over a period of 100,000 years, constellations are unrecognizable.

Polaris is currently the north star, but in 2500 BC a star that is currently in the bowl of the Little Dipper was the north star.

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Response to Fla Dem (Original post)

Fri Nov 15, 2019, 04:39 PM

18. Cue "Galaxy Song", by Monty Python



Galaxy Song - Monty Python's The Meaning of Life

Monty Python

Published on Nov 13, 2008

Subscribe to the Official Monty Python Channel here - http://smarturl.it/SubscribeToPython

Galaxy Song, taken from Monty Python's The Meaning of Life. Terry Jones picked this as part of his Top 10 Monty Python Movie Moments for Esquire Magazine -
"It's such a lovely song. I think it's one of the best things Eric [Idle]'s ever done. There was going to be more animation but Terry was so busy with other parts of the film we ended up using more of the live-action parts that I'd shot for safety."

See the full list here - -http://www.montypython.com/news_terry...

Visit the official Monty Python store - http://smarturl.it/MontyPythonStores

Visit the NEW Monty Python iTunes store - http://smarturl.it/MontyPython1D5TGitun

Welcome to the official Monty Python YouTube channel. This is the place to find top quality classic Python videos, as well as some special stuff that you'll only find here such as interviews and behind-the-scenes footage from our live shows. All the Pythons including John Cleese, Michael Palin, Eric Idle, Terry Gilliam, Terry Jones & Graham Chapman can be found here being incredibly silly.

New videos will be uploaded every Monday!

http://www.montypython.com/
https://www.facebook.com/MontyPython
https://twitter.com/montypython

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Response to Fla Dem (Original post)

Fri Nov 15, 2019, 04:44 PM

19. Very interesting, Thanks for posting.

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Response to Fla Dem (Original post)

Sat Nov 16, 2019, 01:43 AM

20. K&R nt

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Response to Fla Dem (Original post)

Sat Nov 16, 2019, 02:16 AM

21. The continents were different, too

because of plate tectonics and continental drift.

https://qph.fs.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-4c8ee022eb83dda04fc76b9bf6203da5




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Response to Fla Dem (Original post)

Sat Nov 16, 2019, 07:17 AM

22. Modern humans are much younger

Homo sapiens is only 300-400,000 years old.

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