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Wed Oct 30, 2019, 07:07 PM

Do you have a favorite "obscure" 20th Century novel/novelist?

My favorite obscure 20th century novelist has to be Richard Farina, who died riding on the back of a motorcycle right before his novel "'Been Down So long It looks Like Up To Me" was released.

My favorite obscure 20th century novel is "Color Out Of Time" by Michael Shea.

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Reply Do you have a favorite "obscure" 20th Century novel/novelist? (Original post)
red dog 1 Oct 30 OP
LaurenOlimina Oct 30 #1
red dog 1 Oct 30 #2
PoindexterOglethorpe Oct 30 #23
Niagara Thursday #65
proud patriot Oct 30 #3
red dog 1 Oct 30 #7
proud patriot Oct 30 #19
red dog 1 Oct 31 #43
proud patriot Oct 31 #44
OilemFirchen Oct 30 #4
Midnight Writer Oct 31 #29
MaryMagdaline Oct 30 #5
OilemFirchen Oct 30 #9
catrose Oct 30 #26
MaryMagdaline Oct 31 #37
GumboYaYa Thursday #63
MaryMagdaline Sunday #72
uriel1972 Oct 30 #6
red dog 1 Oct 30 #8
uriel1972 Oct 31 #32
uriel1972 Oct 31 #34
red dog 1 Oct 31 #42
uriel1972 Nov 1 #46
red dog 1 Nov 2 #47
uriel1972 Oct 31 #33
uriel1972 Oct 31 #36
GeorgeGist Oct 30 #10
Bradshaw3 Oct 31 #27
TeamPooka Oct 30 #11
JDC Oct 30 #13
TeamPooka Oct 30 #14
JDC Oct 30 #15
TeamPooka Oct 30 #17
JDC Oct 30 #16
JDC Oct 30 #12
malthaussen Oct 31 #38
LiberalLoner Oct 30 #18
geralmar Oct 30 #20
Glorfindel Oct 30 #21
First Speaker Oct 30 #24
UTUSN Oct 30 #22
Kurt V. Wednesday #52
PoindexterOglethorpe Oct 30 #25
Bradshaw3 Oct 31 #30
stevil Oct 31 #28
Bradshaw3 Oct 31 #31
consider_this Thursday #58
Bradshaw3 Thursday #61
consider_this Thursday #66
Bradshaw3 Monday #78
consider_this Monday #77
Niagara Oct 31 #35
TuxedoKat Thursday #60
Niagara Thursday #67
malthaussen Oct 31 #39
red dog 1 Oct 31 #40
red dog 1 Oct 31 #41
Brother Buzz Oct 31 #45
Binkie The Clown Wednesday #53
raccoon Sunday #74
red dog 1 Nov 2 #48
red dog 1 Nov 3 #49
MatthewHatesTrump2 Wednesday #50
ProudMNDemocrat Wednesday #51
emmaverybo Wednesday #54
Kurt V. Wednesday #55
smirkymonkey Wednesday #56
Harker Thursday #57
red dog 1 Thursday #59
GumboYaYa Thursday #62
MatthewHatesTrump2 Thursday #64
MatthewHatesTrump2 Friday #68
lastlib Friday #69
Wolf Frankula Saturday #70
red dog 1 Saturday #71
DFW Sunday #73
red dog 1 Sunday #75
malchickiwick Sunday #76
MatthewHatesTrump2 Yesterday #79

Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 07:17 PM

1. Genre titles.

Replay by Ken Grimwood
Dying Inside by Robert Silverberg

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Response to LaurenOlimina (Reply #1)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 07:19 PM

2. Welcme to DU!

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Response to LaurenOlimina (Reply #1)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 11:21 PM

23. I LOVE Replay.

It would make a great movie.

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Response to LaurenOlimina (Reply #1)

Thu Nov 7, 2019, 09:17 PM

65. Welcome to DU!

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 07:22 PM

3. Richard Bach

Illusions

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Response to proud patriot (Reply #3)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 07:38 PM

7. Richard Bach had a near-death experience

He was landing his small aircraft at a private airport when his landing gear clipped some power lines and landed upside down in a field, taking down two poles and sparking a grass fire.
He suffered a severe head injury and a broken shoulder, but survived the crash.

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Response to red dog 1 (Reply #7)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 08:51 PM

19. I just love his books

I'm so glad he survived

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Response to proud patriot (Reply #19)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 09:14 PM

43. I need to re-read JLS again..I love that little book.

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Response to red dog 1 (Reply #43)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 09:19 PM

44. I should too

That's the first one of his that I read

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 07:26 PM

4. John Barth (n/t)

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Response to OilemFirchen (Reply #4)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 12:28 AM

29. John Barth

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 07:27 PM

5. Walker Percy

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Response to MaryMagdaline (Reply #5)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 07:42 PM

9. ...

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Response to MaryMagdaline (Reply #5)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 11:54 PM

26. Oh yes! Love Among the Ruins!

He was the first author I met. He was friends with my English teacher, and came to talk to us after we read The Movie Goer. He started by apologizing for the cover.

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Response to catrose (Reply #26)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 05:34 AM

37. I loved all of his books!

How lucky to have met him. Are you from New Orleans?

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Response to MaryMagdaline (Reply #5)

Thu Nov 7, 2019, 11:12 AM

63. Love Walker Percy! good call.

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Response to GumboYaYa (Reply #63)

Sun Nov 10, 2019, 01:11 AM

72. Thanks - Are you from New Orleans?

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 07:30 PM

6. Jack Vance... CJ Cherryh and a whole bunch of Sci-Fi authors

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Response to uriel1972 (Reply #6)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 07:39 PM

8. Which Sci-Fi authors?

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Response to red dog 1 (Reply #8)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 01:00 AM

32. Oh my I've forgotten most of them...

Michael Moorcock for starters, the two I listed, Michael Shea of course, gosh darn, so many over the years. I can't recall them Alan Dean Foster since I was 5 for Splinter of the Mind's Eye, one of the many ret-conned Star Wars books lol.

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Response to uriel1972 (Reply #32)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 01:04 AM

34. err doing the math...

Splinter would have come out in Australia when I was about 9.. 1981 I think aaaaaaaaargh so long ago.

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Response to uriel1972 (Reply #32)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 09:09 PM

42. A good friend of mine, who was a professional writer, knew Michael Shea very well

I knew Michael from seeing him at my friend's house many times.

He liked to smoke reefer, a lot.

One time, I sent my writer friend a box of pot cookies, (which I used to bake myself), and Michael Shea ate them all

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Response to red dog 1 (Reply #42)

Fri Nov 1, 2019, 05:51 PM

46. Your cookies may have been the inspiration...

for a story. You never know...

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Response to uriel1972 (Reply #46)

Sat Nov 2, 2019, 07:19 PM

47. This is true!

I was really angry at Micheal when I heard about it, because my friend also could have gotten inspired to write a story or two from those cookies.

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Response to red dog 1 (Reply #8)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 01:02 AM

33. Stanislaw Lem...

The Cyberiad.. one of my favourite poems, His Prix the Pilot's are also very, very , very good.

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Response to red dog 1 (Reply #8)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 01:33 AM

36. William Gibson, Harry Harrison, Terry Pratchett... and so on :)

Oh Fritz Lieber.. The Unbeheaded King series was hilarious.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 07:45 PM

10. William Least Heat Moon ...

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Response to GeorgeGist (Reply #10)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 12:26 AM

27. Blue Highways is a classic

I recommend to anyone planning a road trip - or if they want a great read.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 07:48 PM

11. Ross Thomas aka Oliver Bleek. Writer of mystery/political thrillers/spy novels/conmen

If you like Elmore Leonard you will like Ross Thomas.

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Response to TeamPooka (Reply #11)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 07:51 PM

13. Was it you and I communicating about "The Fools in Town are on Our Side"

a couple of years back?

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Response to JDC (Reply #13)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 07:56 PM

14. yup. one of his best

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Response to TeamPooka (Reply #14)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 07:59 PM

15. i liked it. i also had not read The Eighth Dwarf previously

I liked that even more

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Response to JDC (Reply #15)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 08:25 PM

17. that's my fave too

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Response to TeamPooka (Reply #14)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 08:16 PM

16. I forgot to say thank you for the rec back then.

Thank you.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 07:49 PM

12. George McDonald Fraser - The Flashman Series

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Response to JDC (Reply #12)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 09:36 AM

38. I don't think of Geordie as "obscure..."

... for awhile there, before Pratchett took over, he was the most popular author in Britain.

-- Mal

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 08:40 PM

18. Wolfgang Borchert

Any of his books and poems.

This is one of my favorites, translated to English.

http://www.swans.com/library/art13/xxx123.html

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)


Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 09:47 PM

21. Cordwainer Smith. Any of his science fiction novels or short stories.

The man was a much underappreciated genius.

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Response to Glorfindel (Reply #21)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 11:26 PM

24. This, times a thousand!

...I would bet that Dr Linebarger is the one SF writer most likely to be read in 500 years. His work hasn't aged at all, and indeed, reads better today than when he wrote it. A classic underappreciated genius...

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 10:21 PM

22. Carson McCULLERS: Reflections in a Golden Eye; Heart/Lonely Hunter; Member/Wedding

Really, the movie of Reflections is totally under-estimated.

Don't laugh, but the cast was never better: Liz; Marlon, and the rest (Julie HARRIS, if anybody must know). The names sound so trite, but HUSTON kept them smooth.







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Response to UTUSN (Reply #22)

Wed Nov 6, 2019, 05:16 PM

52. Heart is in my top 10 favs.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 30, 2019, 11:37 PM

25. Stewart O'Nan.

He's been fairly prolific, and doesn't seem well known. His book The Good Wife, which has zero resemblance to or connection with the TV series by the same name, is one of my favorites. It's about a woman whose husband has been robbing houses, and in one robbery things go horribly awry and the homeowner dies. He winds up serving 25 years to life, although it's never clear if he or his partner in robbery was the one who killed the old lady. Meanwhile, the wife remains true to him, despite her family's insistence she divorce him. She also raises their son (she was pregnant when the robbery occurred) alone. It's a powerful book.

Others of his I like include Last Night at the Lobster and Emily Alone.

Another little known book I like is Time on My Hands by Peter Delacorte. A travel writer meets a mysterious man while visiting an obscure museum in Paris. The man says he has a time machine and would like our hero to go back in time and keep Ronald Reagan from becoming President. The book came out in 1997, when many of us agreed that Reagan had been our very worst President ever. I read it back then, and have re-read it several times over the years, and what with W, and now Trump, Reagan just doesn't seem so bad. Our hero decides not to do something so boring as kill Reagan; instead he travels back to 1938 with the intention of getting Reagan a better career. I had thought Delacorte was writing a sequel, but alas none has shown up yet.

Another largely unknown alternate history is Making History by Stephen Fry. By putting a contraceptive into a well in the town where Hitler's parents lived, he's never born. Alas, an even worse person emerges to head the Nazi party and things are worse than ever. Quite good.

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Response to PoindexterOglethorpe (Reply #25)


Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 12:27 AM

28. John Kennedy Toole

Took his life after his novel A Confederacy of Dunces was rejected by multiple publishers. His Mum then brought it to someone who who got it published. He eventually won a Pulitzer.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 12:40 AM

31. Richard Powers

He won the National Book award for fiction in 2006 for the Echo Maker and a Pulitzer Prize so he's not obscure among critics. I think his topics involving technology and grand humanistic themes.

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Response to Bradshaw3 (Reply #31)

Thu Nov 7, 2019, 12:46 AM

58. I was gonna post him!

You beat me to it. I've enjoyed many of his books, after being gripped by first one I read, 'Goldbug Variations'.
He has an artful ability to weave together science, arts, and the human spirit in interesting narratives.
Actually, I'm currently reading "The Overstory". So far trees are the scaffolding of the included stories.

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Response to consider_this (Reply #58)

Thu Nov 7, 2019, 10:42 AM

61. I loved your last sentence

Thanks for posting and great to hear that others appreciate his work. I have to admit that part of my reason for mentioning him is because I got to meet him more than once. Just a really nice man. Through his distinctive. ground-breaking work people might think he is aloof but he is the opposite. If I had to use one word to describe him personally, it would be gracious.

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Response to Bradshaw3 (Reply #61)

Thu Nov 7, 2019, 09:55 PM

66. WOW! I am jealous!

I would be awestruck to meet him. I marvel at the grasp and depth he has on so many subjects, and especially scientific things - but with so much heart I think he is surely charmed. I guess I am predisposed to love his work, as his subjects are many of my own loves, but the way he weaves things together - genius! And he can certainly turn a phrase (a very very long amazing one many times). Just love his work!

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Response to consider_this (Reply #66)

Mon Nov 11, 2019, 05:32 PM

78. His ability to turn a long phrase or sentence is really amazing

Of course Faulkner was the master of this but Powers' ability to do so is near that level. I say that as a former writer who was just amazed at it and know I could never do it.

BTW, if you ever do meet him I am sure he would try to make you feel comfortable.

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Response to Bradshaw3 (Reply #61)

Mon Nov 11, 2019, 05:24 PM

77. Google knows!

Well, apparently since I weighed in on this topic, Google just alerted me on my phone to a video of interest - looks very recent.

Richard Powers speaking: 2019 National Book Festival


Only 15 min in and he is great! - Enjoy!

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 01:29 AM

35. I'm a staunch reader of children's, autobiographies and horror novels

There are books that I haven't yet discovered and books that I can't find. Since I'm somewhat younger than most here, I'm not sure what novels/novelist would be considered "obscure", since the popularity of novels/novelists change over time with each new generation.

Some children's novels that I enjoy would be The Anne of Green Gables book series by L.M. Montgomery, The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus by L. Frank Baum and Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls. There's a short story from Winston Estes called Another Part of the House. Not necessarily a children's story, but told from a child's point of view.

A few years ago, I was at my public library and checked out the book The Other Mrs. Kennedy by Jerry Oppenheimer. I was so enthralled that couldn't put it down and I injured my index finger from holding on to the massive book for long periods of time.

Besides Stephen King and Dean Koontz, I like Anne Rice. Not only do I like and own her Vampire Chronicles series but I also like The Feast of All Saints. Another horror/mystery novelist that I discovered in Jr. High was Shirley Jackson. I wish that she hadn't passed away so young, it would have been nice to read more of her novels.

As you can see, I have many favorites and it was difficult for me to keep a short and possibly obscure list.

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Response to Niagara (Reply #35)

Thu Nov 7, 2019, 09:46 AM

60. Childrens' Literature

Did you ever read any of Edgar Eager's children's novels? They are for ages 8-12, but I remember them fondly. Eager thought E. Nesbit was the best children's author but I never read any of her work. My sister loved this one, The Ship that Flew by Hilda Lewis. A coworker raved about this one, The Bears of Blue River by Charles Major.

I've read the Anne series, but will check out the others you mention. Have read many Stephen King and Anne Rice novels, but never Dean Koontz, not sure why.

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Response to TuxedoKat (Reply #60)

Thu Nov 7, 2019, 10:02 PM

67. Thank you, TuxedoKat

I have never read any of the Edgar Eager's children's novels. I wrote down all the books and authors that you mentioned so that I can try to get my hands on them. I had forgotten to mention that Lisa Jane Smith wrote books when I was in high school that didn't become popular until those books were turned into a television series. Those books and the t.v series were The Vampire Diaries and I still read them to this day.


Dean Koontz writes a little bit of everything and has several different pen names. I hope that you get a chance to check out some of his work.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 09:42 AM

39. So, if Farina is your boy...

... presumably you've read Positively Fourth Street, David Hanju's "life and times" of Farina, Dylan, and the Baez sisters? I thought it was pretty good.

-- Mal

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Response to malthaussen (Reply #39)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 09:02 PM

40. Have not read it, but I'll see if I can order it from the library...It sounds great!

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 09:05 PM

41. "Farewell Horizontal" by K.W. Jeter

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 09:56 PM

45. George R. Stewart - Earth Abides

His 1949 post-apocalyptic novel Earth Abides was my first adventure into Science Fiction as a young teen. I read Earth Abides a few years ago and enjoyed every bit as much as I did as a kid fifty years earlier.

Firm and Storm we good reads in my youth, too

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Response to Brother Buzz (Reply #45)

Wed Nov 6, 2019, 06:25 PM

53. +++ Love that book.

I read it again every 8 or 10 years.

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Response to Brother Buzz (Reply #45)

Sun Nov 10, 2019, 05:43 AM

74. I love that book--read it within 24 hours. Couldn't put it down. Nt

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sat Nov 2, 2019, 07:32 PM

48. "The Falling Woman" by Pat Murphy

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sun Nov 3, 2019, 08:49 PM

49. K.W. Jeter

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Nov 6, 2019, 04:36 PM

50. Not really "obscure" but "Confederate General from Big Sur" by Richard Brautigan

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Nov 6, 2019, 04:50 PM

51. D.H.Lawrence.....

Lady Chatterly's Lover....

I loved how he have his characters such fleshed out personas, complete with flaws, aspirations, and gut wrenching humanity.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Nov 6, 2019, 06:34 PM

54. City of Night by John Rechy

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Nov 6, 2019, 07:35 PM

55. not really obscure but he's Portuguese so maybe unkown to some

jose saramago - blindness

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Nov 6, 2019, 07:48 PM

56. Betty Smith

Author of "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn". I first read it in 7th grade and have probably read it at least 12 times since then. It was probably my one of my favorite childhood books (there are others, but they would not be considered "obscure".

It's probably not that well known, but it was popular enough to be made into a film back in the late 40's. She wrote the book in the 40's but it was set back in the early part of the 20th century and was about a young, impoverished girl's coming of age in Brooklyn, NY with her beloved alcoholic father, her hardworking, but stern mother and her resilient, yet less sensitive and intelligent, younger brother.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Thu Nov 7, 2019, 12:28 AM

57. William Kotzwinkle...

"Dr. Rat" changed my life drastically.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Thu Nov 7, 2019, 03:54 AM

59. "Cradle" by Alan Brennrrt

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Thu Nov 7, 2019, 11:11 AM

62. Not sure if it qualifies as "obscure" if he won the Nobel Prize for Literature

but one of my favorite writers that few Americans have read is Naguib Mahfouz. His depictions of Arabic culture are mind bending.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Thu Nov 7, 2019, 04:42 PM

64. Kildare Dobbs

(Not sure I spelled his name right)

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Fri Nov 8, 2019, 03:33 PM

68. One of my favorite short story writers is Ursula K. LeGuin

She has been in "Fantasy and Science Fiction" (monthly) many times

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Fri Nov 8, 2019, 11:25 PM

69. Novel: Earth Abides, by George Stewart

Great novel! One of my top three all time, along with The City And The Stars and Childhood's End

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sat Nov 9, 2019, 01:04 AM

70. Three No longer available Novels

"Flames of the Dragon" by J.G. Hunter.

"A Town Like Jones'n" by Will West (pseud)

"Irrintzia" by J.M Etxeberria.

Wolf

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sat Nov 9, 2019, 07:30 PM

71. "The Charwoman's Daughter" by James Stephens

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sun Nov 10, 2019, 04:45 AM

73. I don't know if he counts as "obscure"

I liked the few of Rodney Whitaker's books I had read. "The Summer of Katya," "The Eiger Sanction," "Incident at Twenty Mile," and "Shibumi" are my favorites. Completely different themes every time. He usually wrote under the pen name of "Trevanian."

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sun Nov 10, 2019, 11:47 AM

75. Langston Hughes

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sun Nov 10, 2019, 11:58 AM

76. Anthony Burgess: Earthly Powers

While most know Clockwork Orange, that is not even close to being AB's greatest work. EP, I think qualifies, but I'd also highly recommend the Enderby series (hilarious!), The Wanting Seed, Napoleon Symphony, Nothing Like the Sun, Dead Man in Deptford, Kingdom of the Wicked, etc., etc.

Burgess probably should have won a Nobel at some point.

https://www.anthonyburgess.org/

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Tue Nov 12, 2019, 03:05 PM

79. Would Carson McCullers be considered "obscure"?

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