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Mon Sep 23, 2019, 01:18 PM

Scam warning

For some reason that I can't remember back at the end of Sept I paid $1.00 for a 'free trial' of a credit monitoring firm. I discovered that it was even less helpful than the free monitoring of Credit Karma, so didn't do anything to extend the service after the '7 day free trial'. Imagin my shock and awe when a $39.99 charge from them just showed up on my bank account. Evidently, buried somewhere where they assumed you wouldn't see it was the little factoid that if you didn't cancel after the free trial, you would end up paying $40.00 a month for something you can get for free elsewhere. Caveat Emptor! The firm is:

YourScoreAndMore, 866-752-5004, CA

14 replies, 601 views

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Response to Stonepounder (Original post)

Mon Sep 23, 2019, 01:21 PM

1. K&R for visibility..

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Response to Stonepounder (Original post)

Mon Sep 23, 2019, 01:25 PM

2. My husband got scammed last month.

It was for a 7 day trial size of a supplement he wanted to try.

He was charged $139 for not cancelling before the 7th day.

He's fighting it but it doesn't look promising to me. Ugh.

I'm sorry it happened to you.

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Response to Stonepounder (Original post)

Mon Sep 23, 2019, 01:26 PM

3. Kick and yikes!!

Just an FYI - If you have a Capital One credit card, you get your credit score for free every month as well as a report explaining any changes to your score.

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Response to MontanaMama (Reply #3)

Mon Sep 23, 2019, 03:33 PM

6. Not only Capitol One, but I also have Credit Karma as well, which is also free. n/t

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Response to MontanaMama (Reply #3)

Mon Sep 23, 2019, 07:25 PM

12. I have too many cards, but...

I get credit reports from several of them.

Just a click away.

Oh, and that's how those scams go. I'm reminded of the old 60's sitcom F Troop. In the bar in town there was a sign on the bar:

Free Lunch
5 cents

TANSTAAFL--there ain't no such thing as a free lunch

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Response to Stonepounder (Original post)

Mon Sep 23, 2019, 01:28 PM

4. That's not a scam, that's how trials have always work.

You have to cancel so as not to get charged. This is how Netflix, Hulu, Prime, Spotify, magazine sales, newspaper subscriptions, et al operate as well. Definitely not a scam.

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Response to Stonepounder (Original post)

Mon Sep 23, 2019, 01:30 PM

5. That's pretty standard for all "Free Trials".

If you don't cancel before the free trial ends they'll enroll/charge you for whatever service/product they're offering. Lots of people don't realize that and get charged just like you. Most reputable companies will reverse the charge.

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Response to Stonepounder (Original post)

Mon Sep 23, 2019, 03:41 PM

7. Yes, 'Free Trials' usually work this way. But:

The way the offer was presented it was 'try it for 7 days with no obligation' not 'try it for 7 days then we will bill you for (undetermined period of time, undetermined amount) if you don't call this 800 number and listen so our automated sales pitch and tell the robot on the phone 4 or 5 times that Yes you really do want to cancel.

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Response to Stonepounder (Reply #7)

Mon Sep 23, 2019, 07:31 PM

13. And if they didn't ask you for your credit card number, you could have believed it.

That's why I never sign up for free trials. If you don't cancel in time, and give them your credit card number, they will charge you.

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Response to Stonepounder (Original post)

Mon Sep 23, 2019, 03:44 PM

8. Once they get your credit card number, it's clear sailing for them

Don't ever give out your credit card number, especially on a "try it for free" offer.

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Response to FakeNoose (Reply #8)

Mon Sep 23, 2019, 04:48 PM

10. Yeah, I goofed on that one for sure. I'm usually more cautious.

However, some 'try it for free offers' are good and reasonable. We subscribe to several Cable TV channels that we used their 'try for free' and continued with the subscription, and a few others that we canceled before the free time was up, so not all 'try it for free' are scam artists.

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Response to Stonepounder (Reply #10)

Mon Sep 23, 2019, 05:46 PM

11. The solution is a Visa debit card, with only 20 or 30 bucks on it

A Visa debit card is only good for as long there's funds on the card. Once the money is gone, the shyster can't get into your bank account or your credit card and do some real damage. Of course you can decide you like the service they're selling and you're willing to pay for it on a regular basis. Once you've reached that point, you can give them your regular credit card number.

By the way that Visa debit card can be recharged with more funds, or cashed in at any time. I used to get them at the service counter of Walmart, but I think many banks have them too.

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Response to FakeNoose (Reply #8)

Mon Sep 23, 2019, 07:33 PM

14. Yep, that's how it goes.

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Response to Stonepounder (Original post)

Mon Sep 23, 2019, 04:11 PM

9. Gosh what a novel scam!

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