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Wed May 22, 2019, 08:42 PM

What are you currently reading?

Right now I'm reading a biography of Nellie Bly. I'm on a autobiography & biography kick lately. I recently read books about Sophie Tucker, Mae West, Mary Wollstonecraft, Tina Fey, Sid Caesar and Alfred Smith.

What book are you reading?

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Arrow 139 replies Author Time Post
Reply What are you currently reading? (Original post)
IrishEyes May 22 OP
hlthe2b May 22 #1
IrishEyes May 22 #5
True Dough May 22 #2
IrishEyes May 22 #6
True Dough May 22 #8
OriginalGeek May 24 #79
True Dough May 24 #80
raging moderate May 22 #3
dewsgirl May 22 #4
Lady Freedom Returns May 22 #7
femmedem May 22 #9
zanana1 May 24 #68
femmedem May 24 #76
zanana1 May 25 #94
Codeine May 25 #105
PoindexterOglethorpe May 28 #131
Codeine May 28 #132
PoindexterOglethorpe May 28 #134
calguy May 22 #10
IrishEyes May 23 #49
UTUSN May 22 #11
csziggy May 22 #12
First Speaker May 22 #13
Desert_Leslie May 24 #74
First Speaker May 24 #82
eppur_se_muova May 24 #89
Codeine May 25 #104
Codeine May 25 #103
Totally Tunsie May 23 #14
ProudLib72 May 23 #15
Laffy Kat May 23 #16
ProudLib72 May 23 #17
rwsanders May 23 #21
ProudLib72 May 23 #24
Laffy Kat May 23 #58
hunter May 25 #99
Harker May 23 #37
ProudLib72 May 23 #39
Harker May 23 #42
ProudLib72 May 23 #44
reACTIONary May 23 #54
kairos12 May 23 #18
area51 May 23 #19
murielm99 May 23 #20
rwsanders May 23 #22
Hotler May 23 #23
Chalco May 23 #25
redstatebluegirl May 23 #26
cilla4progress May 23 #27
Backseat Driver May 23 #28
trev May 23 #29
BarbaRosa May 23 #30
JimGinPA May 23 #31
PETRUS May 23 #32
chowder66 May 23 #33
IrishEyes May 23 #41
chowder66 May 23 #45
sinkingfeeling May 29 #137
chowder66 May 29 #138
JonLP24 May 23 #34
Midnight Writer May 23 #52
Bradshaw3 May 23 #35
radical noodle May 26 #110
in2herbs May 23 #36
eppur_se_muova May 24 #90
Harker May 23 #38
Hangdog Slim May 23 #40
PETRUS May 24 #72
Generic Brad May 23 #43
IrishEyes May 23 #48
Chellee May 23 #46
IrishEyes May 23 #50
Chellee May 23 #55
reACTIONary May 23 #47
rownesheck May 23 #51
elfin May 23 #53
MLAA May 23 #56
lordsummerisle May 23 #57
B Stieg May 24 #59
CaptainTruth May 24 #60
ancianita May 24 #61
Kind of Blue May 24 #62
trusty elf May 24 #63
Kacy May 24 #64
zanana1 May 24 #69
WestLosAngelesGal May 24 #65
Glorfindel May 24 #66
zanana1 May 24 #67
iscooterliberally May 24 #70
Codeine May 24 #71
DDySiegs May 24 #73
Desert_Leslie May 24 #75
Auggie May 24 #77
Cousin Dupree May 24 #78
jb5150 May 24 #81
Adsos Letter May 24 #83
TrogL May 24 #84
Codeine May 25 #101
mnhtnbb May 24 #85
locks May 24 #86
welivetotreadonkings May 24 #87
PETRUS May 25 #95
welivetotreadonkings May 25 #97
PETRUS May 25 #98
welivetotreadonkings May 27 #118
alfredo May 25 #109
dem in texas May 24 #88
eppur_se_muova May 24 #91
eppur_se_muova May 24 #92
geralmar May 25 #93
locks May 25 #96
hunter May 25 #100
Codeine May 25 #102
PETRUS May 25 #106
KBlagburn May 25 #107
Lucky Luciano May 25 #108
Codeine May 28 #133
DFW May 26 #111
They_Live May 26 #112
Spiggitzfan May 26 #113
NJCher May 26 #114
Magoo48 May 27 #115
yellowdogintexas May 27 #116
NNadir May 27 #117
3catwoman3 May 27 #119
ChazII May 27 #120
IrishEyes May 28 #122
ChazII May 28 #123
IrishEyes May 28 #124
ChazII May 28 #130
ChazII May 28 #135
GetRidOfThem May 28 #121
Brother Buzz May 28 #125
IrishEyes May 28 #127
Kilgore May 28 #126
guillaumeb May 28 #128
elfin May 28 #129
sinkingfeeling May 29 #136
RobinA May 29 #139

Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Wed May 22, 2019, 08:44 PM

1. Sophie Tucker--boy. My parents had a thing for her... I guess she was on Ed Sullivan Show in her

later years... I just can never forget the name though I never really "got it"...

On that score, I read a biography of Tallulah Bankhead (given to me when I named my last dog, Tallulah). Wow, was she SOMETHING! LOL My dog being wildly affectionate was well-named. She was just WILD!

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Response to hlthe2b (Reply #1)

Wed May 22, 2019, 08:53 PM

5. Sophie Tucker had a pretty interesting life.

I read her autobiography right after reading Mae West's autobiography. I think that both books were written in the 1940s.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Wed May 22, 2019, 08:45 PM

2. Currently? I'm reading

this thread!

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Response to True Dough (Reply #2)

Wed May 22, 2019, 08:55 PM

6. I knew someone was going to say that.

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Response to IrishEyes (Reply #6)

Wed May 22, 2019, 09:20 PM

8. Leave it to me!

I'm THAT guy!


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Response to True Dough (Reply #8)

Fri May 24, 2019, 03:07 PM

79. Lies!

I'm somebody and I like that guy.

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Response to OriginalGeek (Reply #79)

Fri May 24, 2019, 03:19 PM

80. You're a rare breed, OriginalGeek

A rare breed, indeed!

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Wed May 22, 2019, 08:47 PM

3. Jonathan M. Metzl's "Dying of Whiteness."

"How the Politics of Racial Resentment is Killing America's Heartland." I first became aware of it when some nasty little crypto-Nazi punks crashed a book signing by Metzl at the Politics and Prose Bookstore.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Wed May 22, 2019, 08:52 PM

4. I prefer non fiction, just finished Midnight in Chernobyl which was excellent. Right

now I am reading the Couple Next Door. I am taking a break from my usual genre, political non fiction. I must have read 20 political books, in the last 2 yrs. and am getting really burned out.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Wed May 22, 2019, 09:16 PM

7. Vampires in Their Own Words: An Anthology of Vampire Voices by Michelle Belanger

Yes I read a lot of things many wouldn't. I write stories and look for all kinds of inspiration.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Wed May 22, 2019, 09:32 PM

9. Facing Toward the Dawn: The Italian Anarchists of New London

They lived in Fort Trumbull, the neighborhood in New London, CT that was razed in the notorious eminent domain battle, but their history was already nearly forgotten by the time the Kelo case happened.

It's surprisingly relevant today: the immigrant experience, labor movement history. Plus I get to imagine a time when hundreds of people would crowd into a theater to listen to a six hour long debate about the best way to overthrow capitalism and achieve a classless society, and learn about the Columbus Day when the anti-fascists beat up the fascists right before the parade.

(I'm reading this for work--but I do like my job.)

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Response to femmedem (Reply #9)

Fri May 24, 2019, 09:27 AM

68. I'm definitely reading that book! Thanks for the post! nt

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Response to zanana1 (Reply #68)

Fri May 24, 2019, 01:03 PM

76. You're welcome. It's expensive, but I hope you'll be able to get it at a library.

At around $80, it's priced for academic libraries. The author told me he wouldn't pay that much for it himself.

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Response to femmedem (Reply #76)

Sat May 25, 2019, 07:07 AM

94. Uh oh. I'll have to save up for it. nt

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Response to femmedem (Reply #76)

Sat May 25, 2019, 03:41 PM

105. Good lord, even the Kindle edition is $75.

Still sounds fascinating.

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Response to Codeine (Reply #105)

Tue May 28, 2019, 09:58 PM

131. The KINDLE edition is $75????

People keep on trying to convince me I should do all my reading on Kindle (or other e-reader) because it's so cheap. HA!

Even without this somewhat unusual example, I've been noticing lately how very expensive Kindle books are, often more than a regular book. Okay, so I really do appreciate that various ebooks are a true godsend to people with vision problems. I am genuinely grateful that I can read just fine with reading glasses. But I think if I were totally dependent on an e reader I'd be quite pissed at the prices.

I will add that I get most of my books from the library, and all libraries lend books electronically, so maybe it wouldn't be so bad were I dependent on an e reader.

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Response to PoindexterOglethorpe (Reply #131)

Tue May 28, 2019, 10:17 PM

132. It just went up actually; $77.92.

Only two bucks cheaper than print. Amazon must sense the interest your post has generated.

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Response to Codeine (Reply #132)

Tue May 28, 2019, 10:50 PM

134. Crap. Sorry to be responsible for a price increase.

Sigh.

Some years back I kept on checking on line for a particular book from my childhood that I wanted. It was rare and somewhat valuable and typically went for about $75.00. One day some totally naive person posted it on line for, I don't recall, maybe ten or fifteen dollars. You can be sure that I instantly snatched it up and only felt a little bit guilty.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Wed May 22, 2019, 09:34 PM

10. I'm currently reading posts on DU

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Response to calguy (Reply #10)

Thu May 23, 2019, 09:45 PM

49. Technically not a book.

However, if you are happy then enjoy.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Wed May 22, 2019, 10:14 PM

11. "currently" as in two weeks ago and stuck 1/3? "Caesar's Messiah: The Roman Conspiracy to Invent Je

Jesus" by Joseph ATWILL - stumbled on it via YouTube, fascinating: (although I see there is a "debunking" YouTube out there, too)









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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Wed May 22, 2019, 11:42 PM

12. The Catalogue of Shipwrecked Books

About Hernando Columbus, his father Christopher and Hernando's collection of books with his organizational method. I've learned more about the father than I wanted to know, but it is an essential part to understanding the son. Hernando basically created the body of myths about Columbus and his achievements so the story of his father is very much the story of his own life.

A good review of the boo: https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/books/the-story-of-christopher-columbuss-son-the-ultimate-completist/2019/03/12/7438f79e-44f6-11e9-aaf8-4512a6fe3439_story.html?utm_term=.12f6cb38c6de

Someone on DU recommended the book and so far I am finding it very interesting.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Wed May 22, 2019, 11:57 PM

13. I'm reading Alison Weir's *The Wars of the Roses*...

...a subject that, quite frankly, has taken up a little too much time out of my life. Also: Fredric Brown's *The Fabulous Clipjoint*--a classic noir novel--Harold Bloom's *Macbeth: a Dagger of the Mind*, and Gerhard Weinberg's *A World at Arms*, by far the best one-volume history of World War Two I've ever read.

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Response to First Speaker (Reply #13)

Fri May 24, 2019, 12:47 PM

74. Recommendation

Another really fabulous book about the war: "The Second World War" by John Keegan

I bought it thinking I would read a couple of chapters that interested me, only to read the entire book in one sitting (ending at 4 a.m.) It's that good.

I've read a few of his other books too -- "The Face of Battle" "The Price of Admiralty"

Uniformly excellent (in my humble opinion)

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Response to Desert_Leslie (Reply #74)

Fri May 24, 2019, 04:44 PM

82. That's an old favorite of mine, too...

...and *The Face of Battle* would be my first choice, if I were teaching a military history course. When I was young, I knew a man who had been thru the Somme. He didn't like talking much about it, but he did once give me his opinion of Haig. It was...colorful.

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Response to Desert_Leslie (Reply #74)

Fri May 24, 2019, 11:05 PM

89. "Uniformly" ?

Are we having fun ?

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Response to Desert_Leslie (Reply #74)

Sat May 25, 2019, 03:39 PM

104. Keegan is great, as long as you ignore his

politics. He’s a master of tactical snippeting, as is Paddy Griffiths.

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Response to First Speaker (Reply #13)

Sat May 25, 2019, 03:36 PM

103. Alison Weir is wonderfully readable.

She takes some shit for that, but she’s a great first introduction to a subject, especially if you’re an American ungrounded in the complexities of the War of the Roses and the Tudors.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 12:02 AM

14. Something catty and frivolous, but such fun...

"Madness Under the Royal Palms", subtitled "Love and Death Behind the Gates of Palm Beach", by Laurence Leamer.

It explores the early days of Palm Beach society, and what makes all those millionaires click. Yes, before you ask, the doturd is mentioned for a bit ~ I'm just not there yet.



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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 12:05 AM

15. Brave New World

Yep, I had never read it before. I knew about it, just had different interests at the time. Then a student came in for tutoring for a literary analysis essay on Brave New World. At the point, I understood I had to read it.

Had to stop reading Geek Love to read BNW, so now I will probably go back to that.

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Response to ProudLib72 (Reply #15)

Thu May 23, 2019, 12:15 AM

16. Years ago when everyone else was re-reading, "1984" I read "Brave New World"

Read it for the first time. Between the two, I think BNW is much more on the mark of where we are now than "1984". What do you think?

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Response to Laffy Kat (Reply #16)

Thu May 23, 2019, 12:38 AM

17. That is a difficult question to answer

I think that there are definitely elements of both present today. You look at the major themes in each:

1984 = 'Big Brother is Watching', 'Doublespeak', various ministries that are named the opposite of their functions, maintaining the State through ideological mind games.

BNW = Stability through a highly ordered society without want or need, ideological indoctrination from birth, capitalism taken to its extreme, unneeded technology for the sake of adding complexity (to promote capitalism it seems).

I see various analogues in our present day society, and I'm sure that the authors were using what they saw in their society at the time they were writing. Isn't that what makes good sci fi, to take what exists and extrapolate?

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Response to ProudLib72 (Reply #17)

Thu May 23, 2019, 01:01 PM

21. I still think Fahrenheit 451 ranks with the other two

Did we discuss this before or was it someone else?
We named our Golden Retriever "Clarisse McClellan" after the girl in the book!

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Response to rwsanders (Reply #21)

Thu May 23, 2019, 01:16 PM

24. I want to take a job as a fireman when it comes to RW authors

Put me in a salamander!

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Response to ProudLib72 (Reply #17)

Thu May 23, 2019, 11:58 PM

58. Sorry to take so long to respond to your insightful comments.

Some of the most powerful parallels to come up for me between where we are heading today and BNW is the intellectual shallowness of the population, obsession with celebrity, discouragement of critical thinking, any form of curiosity, or one-on-one conversation. Then there is the widely used drug Soma in BNW to keep the citizens calm. Almost everyone I know, myself included, is on some form of anti-depressant and/or anti-anxiety drug.

But you're right, there are many overlaps with "1984".

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Response to Laffy Kat (Reply #16)

Sat May 25, 2019, 03:05 PM

99. Terry Gilliam's movie Brazil is closer to our current reality than either book.



Crazy. Who could have imagined Trump?

It must be something in the water.

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Response to ProudLib72 (Reply #15)

Thu May 23, 2019, 05:36 PM

37. It's an interesting book to

compare and contrast with "1984."

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Response to Harker (Reply #37)

Thu May 23, 2019, 05:56 PM

39. It's interesting that both are "dystopian"

1984 is all about repressive State apparatuses. BNW is all about stability through conditioning and drugs. You know how "Room 101" is every person's living Hell? Compare that with the islands they send intellectuals to in BNW. Shoot, the Controller even says he envies those who get sent to islands. He gives them a choice of island to be sent to. The characters' existence is not nearly so horrific until you realize that all of society is created in bottles.

I keep mixing up 1984 with the movie Brazil.

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Response to ProudLib72 (Reply #39)

Thu May 23, 2019, 08:13 PM

42. As a numismatist...

you've found them flip sides of the same coin, I think?

That's how I've always viewed them. Which is more realistic depends on when and where you are, I suppose.

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Response to Harker (Reply #42)

Thu May 23, 2019, 08:54 PM

44. 1984 is the obverse of BNW

And, yes, I would say that which one fits best all depends on place and time.

BNW came out in 1932. What was the driving force behind it? We know good and well why Orwell wrote. I should probably read up on the background to Huxley.

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Response to ProudLib72 (Reply #15)

Thu May 23, 2019, 09:57 PM

54. Brave New World seems to have been inspired...

... at least in part, by the sensibilities of H.G. Wells. In another of his novels, more a roman a clef, the HGW character pontificates on a future where babies are born in glass jars. Apparently he heard such stuff from him.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 12:56 AM

18. Fall and Rise: The Story of 9/11

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 06:46 AM

19. I'm reading

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 10:52 AM

20. I read a book about Nellie Bly and

Elisabeth Bisland's race around the world. I can't remember the title, but it was a good book.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 01:03 PM

22. The Gray Whale: Eschrichtius robustus

Its a summary of gray whale research up to 1980. Journal articles.
Eye of the Whale by Dick Russell is more readable and is a great summary of current research. Great book.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 01:07 PM

23. A.I.S.C. Steel Construction Manual, 14th edition. nt

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 01:28 PM

25. Lake Success, The Apology, The Tender Bar nt

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 01:37 PM

26. The Papers of John Marshall

It is fabulous! 2 volumes I bought at an estate sale a few weeks ago.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 01:37 PM

27. Sapiens, by Yuval Harari

It's a survey of "the history of humankind from the evolution of archaic human species in the Stone Age up to the twenty-first century, focusing on Homo sapiens. The account is situated within a framework provided by the natural sciences, particularly evolutionary biology." Wikipedia.

It reportedly received mixed reviews from experts in the field, but I find quite readable for a text covering such a broad range of time and species experience!

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 01:38 PM

28. Pressure Cooker - Why Home Cooking Won't Solve

Our Problems and What We Can Do About It - Sarah Bowen, Joslyn Brenton, Sinikka Elliott - Oxford University Press 2019


Socioeconomic issues and family food choices in a changing world- Pretty interesting stuff with plenty to chew on.

Haha - edited for my fudgy fingers typos

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 01:42 PM

29. Philip Roth's "The Human Stain."

I love Roth's writing, although I'm not thrilled with the plot of this one. I think my favorite of his is Deception--a story with no narrative, just dialogue.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 01:43 PM

30. Meathead: The Science of Great Barbecue and Grilling

Working on upping my BBQ game.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 01:50 PM

31. 'Presidents of War' - Michael Beschloss

The last few I read;

'The Threat' - Andrew McCabe
'Elevation' - Stephen King
'Becoming' - Michelle Obama
'The Reckoning' - John Grisham
'Fear' - Bob Woodward


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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 01:59 PM

32. "Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World," by Anand Giridharadas

The book isn't flawless (few books are, I guess), but I think it should be widely read (maybe especially by Democrats).

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 03:26 PM

33. The Five: The Untold Lives of the Women Killed by Jack the Ripper

Five devastating human stories and a dark and moving portrait of Victorian London—the untold lives of the women killed by Jack the Ripper.

Polly, Annie, Elizabeth, Catherine and Mary-Jane are famous for the same thing, though they never met. They came from Fleet Street, Knightsbridge, Wolverhampton, Sweden, and Wales. They wrote ballads, ran coffee houses, lived on country estates, they breathed ink-dust from printing presses and escaped people-traffickers.

What they had in common was the year of their murders: 1888. The person responsible was never identified, but the character created by the press to fill that gap has become far more famous than any of these five women.

For more than a century, newspapers have been keen to tell us that "the Ripper" preyed on prostitutes. Not only is this untrue, as historian Hallie Rubenhold has discovered, it has prevented the real stories of these fascinating women from being told. Now, in this devastating narrative of five lives, Rubenhold finally sets the record straight, revealing a world not just of Dickens and Queen Victoria, but of poverty, homelessness and rampant misogyny. They died because they were in the wrong place at the wrong time—but their greatest misfortune was to be born a woman.

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Response to chowder66 (Reply #33)

Thu May 23, 2019, 08:04 PM

41. That sounds interesting.

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Response to IrishEyes (Reply #41)

Thu May 23, 2019, 08:59 PM

45. I'm only a chapter + in and it is interesting. I'll probably devour it over the weekend. nt

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Response to chowder66 (Reply #33)

Wed May 29, 2019, 11:56 AM

137. Sounds great. May I ask where you bought it?

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Response to sinkingfeeling (Reply #137)

Wed May 29, 2019, 12:00 PM

138. Amazon. nt

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 03:49 PM

34. A Lie Too Big To Fail by Lisa Pease

I haven't finished it but the last two chapters look really good. Deals with hypnosis & alleges the agent that inspired Mission Impossible may have been involved don't know yet.

Either way it appears to be the most detailed & sourced book I have seen on the RFK Assassination.

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Response to JonLP24 (Reply #34)

Thu May 23, 2019, 09:56 PM

52. I am reading this, too. A couple of years ago I read The Probe magazine series by her.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 04:09 PM

35. New York

By Rutherfurd. I had read his "London" earlier and really enjoyed it. Multi-generational stories tied in with history and the physical changes of the city and area over hundreds of years.

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Response to Bradshaw3 (Reply #35)

Sun May 26, 2019, 12:54 AM

110. I'm reading Sarum

also by Rutherfurd. I bought it years ago when it was a best seller, but I never quite got around to reading it. Now that I'm retired, I have the time to really get into it. I think all his books are the same style, a little like the Michener books.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 04:33 PM

36. I'm currently reading 5 books but intent on this one: "The Last Camel Charge: The Untold Story of

America's Desert Military Experiment" by Forrest Bryant Johnson. The book is non-fiction and describes the U.S. military's experiment using camels instead of mules and horses on the deserts in the Southwest after the Mexican-American War in 1848.

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Response to in2herbs (Reply #36)

Fri May 24, 2019, 11:10 PM

90. That was a great read ! Thoroughly enjoyed it.

I was amazed to learn how much ground a camel can cover at top speed, and how much weight one can carry. Horses pale by comparison.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 05:46 PM

38. Traleg Kyabgon's

Karma: What it Is, What it Isn't, and Why it Matters.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 06:00 PM

40. The New Jim Crow

Subtitled: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, by Michelle Alexander. It's been on my list for awhile and I'm about half way through. It's a tremendous piece of scholarship and extremely well written. It's also quite disturbing and I recommend it to anyone interested in equal justice and civil rights.

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Response to Hangdog Slim (Reply #40)

Fri May 24, 2019, 12:05 PM

72. That's an excellent book, and one I think everyone should read.

I also highly recommend "The Color of Law" (by Richard Rothstein) for further reading about institutional racism in the US.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 08:13 PM

43. This thread in the DU Lounge

I could be reading a book, but they don't allow for interactive snark.

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Response to Generic Brad (Reply #43)

Thu May 23, 2019, 09:44 PM

48. One of the benefits in my mind.

Sometimes a lady needs a break from the interactive snark.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 09:03 PM

46. We Have No Idea - A Guide to the Unknown Universe

by Jorge Cham & Daniel Whiteson

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Response to Chellee (Reply #46)

Thu May 23, 2019, 09:47 PM

50. I quickly read that as I have no idea.

I thought you weren't sure what you were reading. That books sounds interesting.

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Response to IrishEyes (Reply #50)

Thu May 23, 2019, 09:59 PM

55. LOL!

They say that the universe consists of 5% stuff we know, 27% dark matter, and 68%...we have no idea.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 09:53 PM

51. The Heart of Everything That Is.

It's about Red Cloud.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 09:56 PM

53. "Our Man" by Packer about Richard Holbrooke

So well written about a quixotic, mercurial genius who was at the center of nearly all major diplomatic events from Viet Nam to his death.

Am only about 1/4 through and revisiting such pain about Indochina and such rage about internecine politics and such glimmers of hope all at the same time.

Recommend it, even if you don't reach the same conclusions as the author. Lots of juicy Washington gossip to accompany real-time horrific events.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 10:17 PM

56. Warlight by Michael Ondaatje (author of The English Patient)

I thoroughly enjoyed it. What a writer!

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Thu May 23, 2019, 10:42 PM

57. These Truths

by Jill Lepore
It's actually quite a slog and I may have to get the Cliff Notes on it if I have to return it to the library before I finish it...

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 12:07 AM

59. Assemlage Theory by Manuel Delanda

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 12:23 AM

60. Right now I'm reading this message, on DU.


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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 01:12 AM

61. El Norte by Carrie Gibson, sort of a Zinn treatment of Spanish history/culture in the Americas.

It's powerful, and re-arranges my brain about Julian Castro.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 02:49 AM

62. The Holographic Universe by Michael Talot

From the Back Cover
Nearly everyone is familiar with holograms—three-dimensional images projected into space with the aid of a laser. Two of the world's most eminent thinkers believe that the universe itself may be a giant hologram, quite literally a kind of image or construct created, at least in part, by the human mind. University of London physicist David Bohm, a protégé of Einstein and one of the world's most respected quantum physicists, and Stanford neurophysiologist Karl Pribram, an architect of our modern understanding of the brain, have developed a remarkable new way of looking at the universe. Their theory explains not only many of the unsolved puzzles of physics but also such mysterious occurrences as telepathy, out-of-body and near-death experiences, "lucid" dreams, and even religious and mystical experiences such as feelings of cosmic unity and miraculous healings.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 04:07 AM

63. Austen Henry Layard's "Nineveh and Babylon"

about his second expedition to uncover the remains of Assyrian palaces. Absolutely fascinating.



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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 04:27 AM

64. Barkskins: A Novel by Annie Proulx

Historical saga spanning 300 years in the US with two main family groups, one white and one indian. Environmental impact of tree cutting/forest razing over the centuries is what ties everyone together. Great history of the US, UK, and New Zealand.

I recommend it.
Over 700 pages, but it read fast.
Got great reviews.
She wrote “Shipping News” and “Brokeback Mountain”.

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Response to Kacy (Reply #64)

Fri May 24, 2019, 09:31 AM

69. Barkskins is a great book!

I have Canadian roots so it was especially interesting to me. A story that reflects our times and civilization in general.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 05:33 AM

65. Rusty Nail and also, W is for Wasted

Rusty Nail (Jack Daniels Mystery, #3) by J.A. Konrath
W is for Wasted (A Kinsey Millhone Novel) by Sue Grafton

The Konrath mystery is compelling. I can hardly put it down. It's fast-paced, compared to the Grafton mystery, but I am enjoying both novels. Both of the authors are longtime favorites.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 08:48 AM

66. "Cari Mora" by Thomas Harris

Next up: "The Hope" by Herman Wouk.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 09:26 AM

67. I'm reading "Mitla Pass" by Leon Uris

I love historical fiction. I learn some history and I get a story!

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 11:10 AM

70. I was on a pirate kick for a while.

I read 'Under The Black Flag' by David Cordingly. It was a quick and easy read and very interesting. I bought another book by Baylus Brooks called 'Quest For Blackbeard'. This book is a hard read and I haven't finished it yet. I recently went off on a tangent and read a book about Robert Johnson by Peter Guralnick. Robert Johnson wrote and recorded a bunch of blues songs that were later discovered by Eric Clapton and the Rolling Stones. This was a short book, but it was very interesting since I like music too. I have to get back into this Blackbeard book though. It's a very detailed history book and shows the pirates in a much different light.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 11:26 AM

71. Alternating between a re-reading of Stalingrad

by Anthony Beevor and Bernard Cornwell’s “Lords of the North”, the third book in the Saxon Chronicles series.

After those two I’ve got a couple of Arnhem books to read together, one by Beevor and one by Simon Forty. They aren’t with me so I’m not 100% on the titles.

As ever this reading list is occasionally broken up by comic books, wargame rules, and occasional consults into various Osprey Publishing sourcebooks on particular subjects related to whatever longer books I’m reading.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 12:40 PM

73. I am reading "The Man Without Qualities" ("MWQ")

MWQ is the great political/philosophical novel of the Austrian writer Robert Musil. It is set Vienna in 1913 and deals with disintegration of Austro- Hungarian empire which was soon to be the result of WW I. Its main character Ulrich is the man without qualities. In the disintegrating society that was Austria, he is dealing with the nearly impossible conundrum of how to define himself.

Although this work is over 1100 pages in length, Musil, who worked on it for over 20 years before his death in Switzerland in 1942, never completed it. This is probably why Musil did not get a Nobel prize. MWQ is often spoken of in the same breathe as Proust and Joyce. MWQ is difficult but very much worth the effort.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 01:01 PM

75. The Forest Unseen

I thoroughly enjoyed this nonfiction book -- surprisingly enthralling: "The Forest Unseen: A Year's Watch in Nature" by biologist David George Haskell

From Amazon:

"A biologist reveals the secret world hidden in a single square meter of old-growth forest -- a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the Pen/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award"

"The premise of this book is simple but the result is fascinating. The author, a naturalist, picks a small patch of old-growth forest in Tennessee and visits it three or four times per month over the course of a year."

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 01:03 PM

77. Medgar Evers: Mississippi Martyr

Awesome man

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 01:21 PM

78. Being Mortal: Illness, Medicine and What Matters in the End. Serious book about a serious topic.

And Calypso by David Sedaris for laughs out loud.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 04:26 PM

81. Parliament of Whores by P. J. O'Rourke

I realize that P. J. has become quite the douchbag these days (and maybe he was always a little that way), but he was a very funny writer back in the day, that day being 25 years ago. Seems like the older, and wealthier he got, the bigger asshole he became. In his defense, at least for now, he's not a fan of our current idiot in chief.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 04:57 PM

83. Millennial Dreams and Apocalyptic Nightmares

Millennial Dreams and Apocalyptic Nightmares: The Cold War Origins of Political Evangelicalism by Angela M. Lahr.

How the Cold War became a vehicle for evangelical influence on Conservative politics. Reading this in conjunction with Paul Boyer's When Time Shall Be No More: Prophecy Belief in Modern American Culture.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 04:57 PM

84. Triton - Samuel R. Delaney

Not a straightforward narrative. The book’s multi-layered with umpteen things going on at the same time.

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Response to TrogL (Reply #84)

Sat May 25, 2019, 03:28 PM

101. A challenging read but worth it. nt

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 06:56 PM

85. I have two books going at the moment

Both from the library.

Commander in Cheat -- How Golf Explains Trump
by Rick Reilly. Lawrence O'Donnell gave it a good review one night recently. OMG. The guy cheats at everything golf. I played some when I was younger. There is quite a code of honor among golfers, which is self-enforced. I'm about 1/3 of the way through the book and the author (wrote for Sports Illustrated for years) is right now going through how Trump inflates the values of his golf courses for financial purposes and seriously lowballs the value of the courses for tax purposes. He cheats at everything: moving his ball, taking gimmee's, under reporting his score, moving his opponent's ball. He always rides alone in a cart and apparently takes off down the fairway as soon as he's hit--always tees off first--and that's part of how he is able to change the lie of his ball or move an opponent's ball by getting there way ahead of the rest of his foursome. The author quotes all kinds of people who've played with Trump reporting these stories of how he cheats (and lies about it). His caddies report how he cheats. The guy is one giant cheater.

The other book I'm reading--just started a series--is a mystery set in Charleston. First book is The House on Tradd Street by Karen White. I'm going to Charleston next week for several days of their Spoleto Festival and I enjoy reading novels set in places where I've traveled. My husband and I started going to the Spoleto Festival about 2012, and went for 5 years. We used to stay in a little cottage that was on the property of one of the big homes south of Broad and we'd walk along Tradd Street going to/from events.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 08:05 PM

86. Daring Democracy

Igniting power, meaning and connection for the America we want by Frances Moore Lappe and Adam Eichen

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 08:28 PM

87. The Uninhabitable Earth.

I suggest everyone voting in the Dem primary to do the same.

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Response to welivetotreadonkings (Reply #87)

Sat May 25, 2019, 11:14 AM

95. I read that last week.

I've been trying to convince others to read it, but most people just don't seem to want to face it.

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Response to PETRUS (Reply #95)

Sat May 25, 2019, 01:31 PM

97. Scary stuff

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Response to welivetotreadonkings (Reply #97)

Sat May 25, 2019, 01:41 PM

98. Indeed.

My wife and I often share what we learn as we're reading. When I picked up this book, she told me "I don't want to hear it."

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Response to PETRUS (Reply #98)

Mon May 27, 2019, 06:24 PM

118. Lol sounds similar to me and my significant other

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Response to welivetotreadonkings (Reply #87)

Sat May 25, 2019, 09:15 PM

109. On a more hopeful note "The World without us"

It shows how the earth will recover after we screw ourselves into extinction. Some of the big losers are domestic animals that have been bred for our wants, not the animal’s needs. They may have a hard time without us to protect them.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 09:49 PM

88. Book on Qunnah Parker

Empire of the Summer Moon- Rise and Fall of the Comanches, The Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American history

Just got it, books about early Texas and the Southwest are my favorite reads.

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Response to dem in texas (Reply #88)

Fri May 24, 2019, 11:19 PM

91. An excellent read. nt

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Fri May 24, 2019, 11:33 PM

92. Just finishing up "A Very Courageous Decision" by Graham McCann ...

It gives the history of the British TV comedies "Yes, Minister" and "Yes, Prime Minister". Maybe a bit too verbose for some, but leaves one with a real sense of how exceptional were the accomplishments of the writers and actors. Learned some interesting details of how the BBC differs from American TV, and learned some things about Ms. Thatcher that made me cringe all over again. I had recently bought the DVDs of YPM and finished watching them before reading the book, which really put me in the mood to pick up the book again, after setting it down for a long hiatus. It was an entertaining read, but not lacking in serious content, and I kind of needed some non-technical reading to break the drudgery.

The same author has written a book about "Fawlty Towers", and I might be interested in locating that.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)


Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Sat May 25, 2019, 01:13 PM

96. Billly Budd, Sailor

By Herman Neville. The Central City Colorado operas this summer will be Billy Budd and Madama Butterfly.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Sat May 25, 2019, 03:15 PM

100. I'm working my way backwards through Gardner Dozois "The Year's Best Science Fiction" editions.

I used to read this series regularly until our kids were born.

Now that they are grown up and moved away I figured I could catch up.

It will take many years, especially since there are so many other books to read.

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Response to hunter (Reply #100)

Sat May 25, 2019, 03:30 PM

102. Those books were a staple of mine for a long time.

Not sure why I drifted away from them, to be honest.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Sat May 25, 2019, 04:00 PM

106. Started a new book last night:

"How to Hide an Empire: A History of the Greater United States," by Daniel Immerwahr. Only 87 pages in, but so far it's fascinating.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Sat May 25, 2019, 05:50 PM

107. White House Diary...Jimmy Carter

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Sat May 25, 2019, 06:37 PM

108. Eigenvectors of Some Large Sample Covariance Ensembles

https://arxiv.org/pdf/0911.3010.pdf

Eigenvectors of some large sample covariance matrix ensembles

Olivier Ledoit, Sandrine Péché
(Submitted on 16 Nov 2009)

We consider sample covariance matrices SN=1pΣ1/2NXNX∗NΣ1/2N where XN is a N×p real or complex matrix with i.i.d. entries with finite 12th moment and ΣN is a N×N positive definite matrix. In addition we assume that the spectral measure of ΣN almost surely converges to some limiting probability distribution as N→∞ and p/N→γ>0. We quantify the relationship between sample and population eigenvectors by studying the asymptotics of functionals of the type 1NTr(g(ΣN)(SN−zI)−1)), where I is the identity matrix, g is a bounded function and z is a complex number. This is then used to compute the asymptotically optimal bias correction for sample eigenvalues, paving the way for a new generation of improved estimators of the covariance matrix and its inverse.

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Response to Lucky Luciano (Reply #108)

Tue May 28, 2019, 10:26 PM

133. Picked that up for beach reading this summer.

The mysterious symbols are very relaxing.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Sun May 26, 2019, 01:31 AM

111. I got lazy

I picked up an English translation of a book my wife read in German. The original was in Swedish, which I can read at least as well as German, but I just felt lazy this time: "The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared"

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Sun May 26, 2019, 02:26 AM

112. Man And His Symbols

Carl Jung (and others)

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Sun May 26, 2019, 05:58 AM

113. Books

Philosophy and the Dark Tower is expected to be released on May 30th. Until then just fillers, short stories.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Sun May 26, 2019, 08:58 AM

114. Just finished Bad Blood Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup

by the Wall Street Journal reporter John Carreyrou. This woman Elizabeth Holmes played the 1 per cent for suckers and she played plenty of well-known Democrats, too. She bilked Wal-mart and many of our other favorite one-percenters.

She conned Hillary and she conned Joe Biden, too, into believing in her (I don't know that they invested $$; they appeared with her publicly and praised her).

Holmes was indicted on nine counts of wire fraud and two counts of conspiracy to commit wire fraud in June of 2018. Since that time, she's been prancing around with her younger boyfriend by about 10 years, acting like she hasn't a care in the world.

Her premise for her product was so stupid that even I, an English teacher, knew it wouldn't play when I heard about it. You don't have to be a genius to figure that out and how she was able to get by with her scam for 10 years is a very interesting story indeed. In fact, it's so interesting that I may use it as the text for a class I'm proposing. I won't spoil it, though. Read the book and find out how she did it!



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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Mon May 27, 2019, 04:23 PM

115. Ok,

The Dispossessed— Ursula K. Le Guin
and
Desert Solitaire— Edward Abbey

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Mon May 27, 2019, 04:36 PM

116. City of Endless Night Preston and Childs

a fairly recent Pendergast novel

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Mon May 27, 2019, 04:51 PM

117. Back Issues of Environmental Science and Technology, The Chemistry of Materials, and...

...Industrial Engineering and Chemistry Research, among other favorite journals and the ever popular best seller, U-Th SERIES NUCLIDES IN AQUATIC SYSTEMS edited by S. KRISHNASWAMI and J. KIRK COCHRAN.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Mon May 27, 2019, 09:22 PM

119. I am almost done with Michelle Obama's book.

She is a very fine writer. I was captivated before I finished the preface.

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Response to 3catwoman3 (Reply #119)

Mon May 27, 2019, 11:14 PM

120. What my son is reading.

My son is currently reading Stephen King: Dark tower III The Waste Lands. The reason I'm posting this and not him is because he is a Conservative and I won't let him join DU.

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Response to ChazII (Reply #120)

Tue May 28, 2019, 11:40 AM

122. My mom has two conservative children

She can't figure out how that happened. She has always been a very politically active liberal democrat. At least, one of her children is a liberal democrat.

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Response to IrishEyes (Reply #122)

Tue May 28, 2019, 08:00 PM

123. IrishEyes

Hi IrishEyes hope you are doing well! I'm Jay, ChazII's son. I asked for permission to post, she said yes, just let them know who you are first. I said yes. i just wanted to let you know that even though I am a conservative, i am not a far wing nut jobs, that will tell you, everything you do is wrong, it a matter of opinion. We'll agree to disagree. I don't watch faux News Religiously. I watch CNN, Chris Matthews, Rachel Maddow, etc. I listen to both sides, research before I make my opinion. I will probably be one of the most level-headed conservatives you might meet. I will never bash your opinions. I will respect you and your beliefs.

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Response to ChazII (Reply #123)

Tue May 28, 2019, 08:29 PM

124. Sorry to have upset you so much.

I love my conservative brothers. I did not mean to make you feel like I'm insulting you. My family is very political and we discuss politics all the time. My mother only jokingly asks where she went wrong. In the same way that she would ask where she went wrong if one of her children were a New York Yankees fan. My brothers are good people. We just disagree politically. We debate politics all the time. I respect their opinions just like I respect your or anyone else's opinions. I don't bash peoples opinions. I always respect peoples beliefs.

I did not call you or anyone else a right wing nut job. I never said anything about Fox News, CNN, Chris Matthews, Rachel Maddow, etc.

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Response to IrishEyes (Reply #124)

Tue May 28, 2019, 09:46 PM

130. IrishEyes

Jay here, you didn't upset me, I misread your post, I'm sorry, that happens to me sometimes. Have a good night my friend!

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Response to IrishEyes (Reply #124)

Tue May 28, 2019, 11:11 PM

135. Hi,

Some folks here at DU already know that Jay was diagnosed with a stage 4 glioblastoma. The same type of tumor that John McCain had. The surgeon was able to remove 80%+ which is good. However, it is in the part of the brain that controls cognitive skills. Sometimes Jay misunderstands what the writer means. It grows more difficult for him to distinguish what the writer is trying to say. Thank you for reaching out to my son in a kind way.

I allowed to him make a few postings because he was given a 15 month life expectancy by one of the doctors. The cancer was the first blow but such a short time he took very hard. We are fighters and know we will beat this. I wanted you to know that as a mom, I appreciate the kindness in your reply to him.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Tue May 28, 2019, 05:55 AM

121. TrumpNation...

Author argues he never really was a billionaire. He is cinvincing (the author, I mean)

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Tue May 28, 2019, 08:48 PM

125. The Library Book by Susan Orlean

Boy howdy, I just started reading it after waiting forever to get my copy from the library. I just finished the first chapter, and I can say with authority, "It was worth the wait"!!!!

The Library Book

by Susan Orlean


On the morning of April 29, 1986, a fire alarm sounded in the Los Angeles Public Library. As the moments passed, the patrons and staff who had been cleared out of the building realized this was not the usual fire alarm. As one fireman recounted, “Once that first stack got going, it was ‘Goodbye, Charlie.’” The fire was disastrous: it reached 2000 degrees and burned for more than seven hours. By the time it was extinguished, it had consumed four hundred thousand books and damaged seven hundred thousand more. Investigators descended on the scene, but more than thirty years later, the mystery remains: Did someone purposefully set fire to the library—and if so, who?

Weaving her lifelong love of books and reading into an investigation of the fire, award-winning New Yorker reporter and New York Times bestselling author Susan Orlean delivers a mesmerizing and uniquely compelling book that manages to tell the broader story of libraries and librarians in a way that has never been done before.

In The Library Book, Orlean chronicles the LAPL fire and its aftermath to showcase the larger, crucial role that libraries play in our lives; delves into the evolution of libraries across the country and around the world, from their humble beginnings as a metropolitan charitable initiative to their current status as a cornerstone of national identity; brings each department of the library to vivid life through on-the-ground reporting; studies arson and attempts to burn a copy of a book herself; reflects on her own experiences in libraries; and reexamines the case of Harry Peak, the blond-haired actor long suspected of setting fire to the LAPL more than thirty years ago.

Along the way, Orlean introduces us to an unforgettable cast of characters from libraries past and present—from Mary Foy, who in 1880 at eighteen years old was named the head of the Los Angeles Public Library at a time when men still dominated the role, to Dr. C.J.K. Jones, a pastor, citrus farmer, and polymath known as “The Human Encyclopedia” who roamed the library dispensing information; from Charles Lummis, a wildly eccentric journalist and adventurer who was determined to make the L.A. library one of the best in the world, to the current staff, who do heroic work every day to ensure that their institution remains a vital part of the city it serves.

Brimming with her signature wit, insight, compassion, and talent for deep research, The Library Book is Susan Orlean’s thrilling journey through the stacks that reveals how these beloved institutions provide much more than just books—and why they remain an essential part of the heart, mind, and soul of our country. It is also a master journalist’s reminder that, perhaps especially in the digital era, they are more necessary than ever.

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Response to Brother Buzz (Reply #125)

Tue May 28, 2019, 09:02 PM

127. That sounds interesting.

I will have to add it to my list.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Tue May 28, 2019, 08:58 PM

126. Ringworld Engineers

By Larry Niven

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Tue May 28, 2019, 09:14 PM

128. City of Brass, by S Chakraborty

Speculative fiction.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Tue May 28, 2019, 09:33 PM

129. Our Man - about Richard Holbrook

On my Kindle - Excellent.

Off Kindle -

The Day That Never Comes - Caimh McDonnell - Irish mystery, hilarious and profane.

Plus -- the Washington Post edition of the Mueller Report.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Wed May 29, 2019, 11:37 AM

136. The Mueller Report.

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Response to IrishEyes (Original post)

Wed May 29, 2019, 12:16 PM

139. Rebecca

by Daphne du Maurier. Never read it. VERY well written. Not sure what's coming next. Possibly Bad Blood if I can get it from the library. I'm also looking at a Phil Spector bio.

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